This topic contains 35 replies, has 22 voices, and was last updated by  kjohn 3 weeks ago.

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  • #33812
     Goodsteel 
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    There are several action types on the market these days.

    Marlin 1894, 336, and 39 basic styles

    Winchester 94, 1886 and 92s, 1895, 1876

    Henry

    Savage 99

    Browning BLR

    I actually have a deep love for each of these in their own way. If a sleek mountain rifle is the need, a Savage99 is the best.
    If a hunting rifle for big game is needed, the Marlin 1895, Winchester 1895, or Winchester 1886 is the rifle of choice.
    If deer hunting, the Marlin 1894, 336, or Winchester 94 or 92 is REALLY hard to beat.
    If I’m looking to shoot fast, and dump copious amounts of heavy lead downrange, a slicked up Marlin 1895. If cowboy action shooting is the game, then the 76 cannot be beat.

    It’s actually difficult to pick a favorite. The 45-70’s are definitely some of my favorites. I like the buttery feel of the 1886 (even though it is a bit stiff) but if I need to really pump the bullets downrange, my Marlin 1895 SS is so slick, I can work the lever with my middle and ring finger about as fast as any semi automatic rifle. Positively epic!

    It’s hard to pinpoint where my love of the levergun comes from, but I suppose it’s because my very first center fire rifle, and the only one my father ever gave me, was a Marlin 336. I shot thousands of cast bullets through that rifle.
    I suppose the reason I like it is that it’s more reliable than a semiautomatic rifle, but still allows me to keep my eyes and sights on the target while shooting FAST. It’s the original assault rifle. Bolt actions, for all their inherent precision, require such uncouth yanking and pulling, twisting and pushing to manipulate them, I have never had an easy time keeping the sights on the target shot after shot, which slows things down for me.
    If you like to be able to make 7 aimed shots in as many seconds, the choices of rifles is limited, and a properly tuned lever action can only be beaten by a semi automatic rifle. Obviously, the AR-15 or the Winchester 1876 fitted with a short stroke kit can be operated MUCH faster than one shot per second, but neither of these is practical for field use in my opinion. For any of the common Lever Action hunting calibers, one shot per second is moving pretty durn fast. Not because the lever cannot be run faster, but because it takes half a second to recover from recoil, and get back on target.
    However, even though the hand placement is different, the AR-15 and the lever action rifle have this in common: With both of them, you keep your hands away from your face, and your cheek weld need never be broken. All motions with the lever action are straight forward, push/pull in nature and this is a far cry easier to deal with than twisting a bolt action open. Sure, a person can learn to run a bolt action without losing your sight alignment (I have done this myself) but it will never be as natural as flicking the lever on a 30-30.

    If I had to have only one of these awesome rifles, I would have to begrudgingly defer to a JM Marlin 336 in 30-30.
    What’s your favorite?

  • #33814
     Menner 
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    JM Marlin 336 in 35 Rem only Lever I own (so far)
    Tony

  • #33815
     1johnlb 
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    I would have to say the ithaca 72, 22lr. For the purpose that it was my first, after graduating up from the bb gun. It was old faithful up until my young adult life even after owning various other firearms. There wasn’t anything within range that me and old faithful couldn’t put holes in.
    Then in my 20s I got my first winchester 94 then a second and never had a need or even realized that anything else was made.
    Then at the range one day, one of the RO had brought in a uberti 73 with a ss kit in it, that he had to wipe the drool off of when I handed it back. I don’t own one yet but one day, maybe I’ll be able to drool on my own.

  • #33816
     Harter 
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    This could turn ugly …..
    Having owned an Marlin 1895 CB I preferred it over the same cartridge in a 94′ Winchester but that may have been those 5 rifles that day and I doubt very much that the Winchester really shines with the 357 …..

    Having shot a GG JM Marlin and a 96′ I find them to be a dead heat , both in 45-70 .

    Based on the Marlin vs 92′ in 357/38 I’d give the nudge to the Marlin here also but again it is likely the gun on that day . The Rossi 92′ hangs up on the 357s in that particular rifle but will keep 3-5 in the air with 38s ….

    Having “fixed” the feed guides and avoiding Remington brass in the Rossi 92’s available I prefer them over the brand new Henry in 45 Colts . The Henry is a very slick smooth rifle it aims and points well and it’s not a bad looking rifle but the 92′ gets the nod here because it just feels right and in both a 16 and 20″ they carry better . So in spite of Rossi quality it’s a 92′ over a Henry .

    I believe given the choice side by side I’d walk away crying having to choose between a Bot and a 99 regardless of cartridge . After everything falls the BLR would probably come out on top in spite of my deep love of forged steel asthetics would win out and the BLR looks like a lever gun .
    The Savage has fluid lines wears a sling well , begs to wear fixed 6 32mm scope and swings as well as any other . Accuracy is generally above average as well .

    So there it is .
    Marlin for the light PCC .
    92′ for the heavy PCC .
    Large caliber rifle is a dead heat between Marlin and Winchester . I guess since I have 92’s the 96′ would take this class .
    Modern cartridge goes to the BLR because it looks and feels like a lever gun .

    Looks like JMB wins 3 classes even if they worn Ollie’s name .

    ​​​​​​​I don’t know what it is , I just don’t like the 94′ .

  • #33821
     Butch Wax 
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    Have had many. Some from the 19th century. All gone now. Only have a 2015 mfg Rossi R92 357mag 20″ with octagon barrel and casehardened receiver, nosecap, and curved buttplate. After working on the action and lapping the bore, with just the factory buckhorn sights it groups in the under 2″ 5 shot world at 100yds if I do my part. It’s no super tack driver, but does for my coyote and hog killing in my woods well enough.
    Don’t want any more or another one. I’m satisfied with this one.

  • #33823
     ZmanWakeForest 
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    Many have come, some have left, some still need to leave (maybe….lol)

    There are those who will argue, but the BLR is 243 win with nosler ballistic tips is lights out, hands down the best shooting lever action I personally have ever messed with. Also in the browning line is 17HMR Mach 2 that I have yet to start messing, but it was just too cheap to pass on and NIB when I purchased it at auction for just over $300.

    The Savage 99’s are a very nice handling firearm are even more fun too look at and admire the rotary magazine. The 250-3000, the 303 Savage, the 300 Savage are all still here. The 22 HP went down the road….sometimes folks want something and are willing to pay your “I don’t want to sell it” price.

    A single lonely winchester 94 in 30-30 stands in the corner of the safe, probably only because it was from my uncle’s collection when he passed. Personally unless it’s a pre-64 (which I’m not willing to pay the price for anymore) I’m not interested. Only exceptions being a 7-30 Waters….if someone has one you want to part with….I’m probably in!

    The Marlins have come and gone, but some even made a second appearance. The 444 is a favorite and I recently started messing with 25-20 and I really like it as well. There have been more 30-30s than I care to mention and in the future there will be no more. Not that there is anything wrong with the 30-30, but my interest lacks severely in the caliber in general. What really turned me off was a 336 that would feed some factory ammo, but not others….and reloads for it had to be checked and double check to ensure they would chamber. Take the same factory ammo or reloads and put them in a winchester and they work perfect.

    As far as the Henry’s, I am not a fan. The actions are smooth, but the pot metal receivers were/are a real turn off. I don’t keep track of them, perhaps Henry has changed this since.

    What I would be interested in now is a Marlin in 218BEE and 32 H&R Mag! They are on the list. Also a NIB 7-30 Waters would really trip my trigger!

    If I could keep only one…..it would be the 444. I could buy only one more…it would be a tough choice on the 218BEE or a 7-30 Waters.

  • #33824
     WCM 
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    For me the 86 win in .45/70 would be the king.
    I grew up shooing a Marlin 1895 .45/70 I got in 1972.
    I will always love that rifle,and with failing eyesight , I use Leupold VX3 1.5X5

    I still enjoy hunting with my Marlin .444 that I gotfor Christmas in 73
    With the advent of Hornadys new Superformance 265 gr factory load it now has the ballistics once advertised in the Marlin catalogs.

    My first deer rifle was a Marlin 336 .30/30 that I got in 1970

    I still like the Winchester 95 in .405 win, but with each passing year it is harder for me to see the sights.

  • #33825
     Harter 
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    You don’t by any chance want a 7-30 Waters do you ? 😉 I don’t have but I may have noticed your interest …….

  • #33827
     Bodean98 
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    Another easily answered question for me.
    My Marlin 1893 in 38-55!!
    Why? Because it is the only lever gun I own!! (for now):rolleyes:

  • #33828
     skeettx 
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    Two guns
    Win 1886 in 45-70
    Marlin Cowboy in 38-55
    Two different purposes
    Mike

  • #33829
     kens 
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    Marlin 1895, 45-70.
    only one I got.
    This thing is big, heavy, and slow and seems cumbersome. Maybe just because of its heft, and such a large cartridge.
    I have never tried a smaller one like a .357 or .44mag. I heard the ’73 was THE race gun for action cowboy shooting, a fast, slick action.
    when Tim mentioned you can keep the gun shouldered and work the action, I never really thought of it that way.
    I might have to look at a smaller lighter one.

  • #33833
     Goodsteel 
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    If you would like to send me that 1895 for a little TLC, I think I could change your mind on its handling. I can make it shuck those giant cartridges like 22LR. Ask Bjornb, he has one of my slicked up 95s……

  • #33834
     Goodsteel 
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    In order to shoot the various Marlins fast, I first slicked up the actions to the point they can be worked smoothly with light finger pressure. Three pounds pressure is all it takes to run the lever through its stroke.
    After that, I use a shooting technique, that I modified from the British mad minute used with the SMLE rifles.
    Basically, I put only my third and ring fingers in the lever. Only the tips, much as if it were a trigger itself.
    The thumb remains pinched to the trigger finger, and the pinky remains free outside the lever.
    This makes the right hand a tight knot, and the only finger that moves is the trigger finger, and that only slightly.
    The rifle is controlled and pointed entirely by the left hand, because you make no grip on the wrist of the rifle with your right. You simply grip the forend and keep the butt pinned on your shoulder as you swing.

    Now, this hurts like hell if the rifle isn’t pretty easy to run, but give it a try if you like.
    The concept is that the lever becomes like a big trigger. You throw the lever forward with your middle and ring finger, then snap them back to close it, at which point, your trigger finger cones to rest right on the side of the trigger. Get the tention right, and all it takes is a little tug to trip it off. A little practice with target acquisition, and its a fluid pop pop pop, and believe it or not, you can bust 2″ targets at 50 yards about as quick as you can run the lever.
    its a good thing lead is cheap because this takes a bit of practice, but its quite impressive to rip off 4 or 5 full house 45-70s and blow up beer cans at 50 yards lickety split.
    in the woods, I find myself racking the rifle and watching the deer hit the dirt in the scope with my finger ready to trip off a second shot like a sumliminal reaction.
    This doesn’t work worth a tinkers curse with these new big loop levers BTW. My favorite is the straight grip cowboy lever.

  • #33835
     ZmanWakeForest 
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    Slightly…only slightly! lol

  • #33839
     kens 
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    Well, now you got me thinking, I been lately all about a short, light little Mauser for such work as you describe; fast action on deer/hogs.
    Do I have to give up my small ring .35rem carbine project, and send you my JM 1895 ???

  • #33841
     Goodsteel 
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    Well, let me tell you something. My knowledge of shooting fast with a 45-70 was brought on specifically because I hunted in an area where there was a very real possibility of being attacked by a huge hog (this animal had already tried to tear up my nephew and I just couldn’t have that). For one week, I entered the woods in low light, and exited the same way. The foliage was thick and obstructed my view for all but ten yards, and I was very aware that if the hog attacked, I would only have time to shoot one shot with my Remington 700 in 300 WinMag with the 4-12 Leupold scope on it, and the liklihood of actually conecting with the hog with that single shot would be slim. Even though the hog never showed himself to me, twice a day for a week I contemplated the limitations of my long range rifle in this situation, and I came away with a determination to NEVER be in that situation again without an option for a better suited rifle.

    But what rifle? I had calculated that I would have only two seconds to act if the SHTF with a 300lb pig in that dense foliage. I would know the basic direction he was coming from and I could probably get the gun to my shoulder, but when he busted out to get me, it would be completely dependent on how fast I could crank out two aimed shots.
    This certainly made me aware of why big game hunters have such love of the big double rifle. It’s unlikely that a third shot would be an option.

    My first thought was that the British Mad Minute would get the job done in this situation, so I went and bought a SMLE rifle. I was unhappy with the cartridge though, and I wanted to throw something larger than 30 caliber, so I designed a wildcat in 35-303 improved (I pet named it the 358 Malcolm) and got that rifle to where I could run 250grain cast bullets at over 2000 FPS. The problem was actually using the Mad Minute to hit anything. It’s very posible, but because of the constant twisting of the action, it takes a high degree of skill to pop two shots into a tight pattern impromptu. Awesome rifle, but even with the battle sights it was only slightly better than the Remington 700 for fast shooting.

    It was then that a friend asked me to refinish his Marlin444. I did an action job on it, and reblued it, and in the course of crawling over every orifice of that gun, I realized awful sudden like that I was beholding the answer to my problem.
    I put feelers out, and soon I was the proud owner of a Marlin 1895 guide gun in 45-70. I stroked the parts in that action with stones till it would run like greased lightning. I practiced a lot with it, and I found it lent itself very easily to the task I bought it for. The 45-70 shooting a 400 grain cast bullet is enough shutupandlaydown juice for any hog I could imagine. I finally had a rifle that shot fast, and delivered enough energy to the target that it actually overwhelmed my stated desires by a healthy margin. In fact, I dare say I could easily rip off 3 solid hits at 10 yards in less than 2 seconds! Since then, the 45-70 has been a permanent fixture in my stable (right up front) and I have explored its usability at longer range. I do not believe it possible to call the 45-70 a precision rifle no matter how hard I squint, but it certainly has enough precision to hold its own out to 200 yards on anything larger than a groundhog, and that’s good enough for 99.999% of hunting, and does nothing to detract from it’s enormous advantage at close range when shit goes pear shaped.

    I continued searching for even more effective means of dealing with dangerous North American game at close range, and I have found the 45-70 lever action to be surpassed in effectiveness at close range by a semi automatic 12 gauge loaded with bore diameter cast lead balls, and surpassed in long range ability and close range speed by the M1A battle rifle, both of which are far more expensive and modern designs.
    For general use, I do often grab the M1A for a come what may, “I shall fear no evil” rifle, but if I really think I’m going to be around dangerous critters up close, the 45-70 is my rifle and even death will have to pry my fingers from its stocks one at a time.

    I only wish it was faster to load, or it held more shots for the same length, and to that end, I’m dreaming of building a 1895 in 475 Linbaugh rimmed, but I’m not too hot to trot on that because the truth is, any situation that was bad enough that a “guide guns worth” of 45-70 bullets will not handle, is a situation I should never have been around in the first place and probably never will.

  • #33847
     Larry Gibson 
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    My favorite lever action rifle is still the M94 Winchester (pre jap made ones) in 30-30 or 32 SPL. Of all the models I favor the M64 rifle with half magazine. If a scope is to be used the Black Shadow AE model is excellent. It allows the scope to be mounted over the bore as low as a Marlin or Savage. The stock is also made with a comb height to accommodate an aperture rear sight or the scope. Best is the 24″ barrel has a 12″ twist in 30-30. Might have been better with a 14″ twist but the 12″ is a lot better with cast than Marlins 10″ twist. Of course the Savage 99s in 30-30, 303 Savage, 300 Savage and .308W had 12″ twists also. That’s why the Savage 99 ranks second with me.

    The M94AE Black Shadow in 30-30 using a 311041 under LeveRevolution makes it a 300 yard medium game rifle with very good accuracy obtainable at 2250+ fps. The Hornady 160 FlexTip over LeveRevolution runs 2450 fps 1 1/2 – 1/3/4 moa accuracy which makes for a 400 yard capable game rifle. Several different 150 gr jacketed bullets run 2565 + fps and also would be excellent for smaller medium game such as antelopes and smaller deer……probably deadly on coyote and other varmints as well. Had Winchester made the M94AE Black Shadow with 24 – 26″ barrels in 307 and 356 Winchester I would have one of those too!

    Larry Gibson

    Okay, if they had made it in 32 SPL I would have one of those too……:cool:

  • #33850
     kens 
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    tim, I never really thought of the practical reason why the African big game hunters favored the double rifles. I gave it to the old school way things were done back in the day.
    But when you mention having 2 shots (without jacking the action) it makes more sense on toothed/clawed critters.
    Now for the eastern woodlands, if somebody had a double rifle .44mag or .30-30, that would be just downright cute.

  • #33851
     Goodsteel 
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    kens;n14684 wrote: tim, I never really thought of the practical reason why the African big game hunters favored the double rifles. I gave it to the old school way things were done back in the day.
    But when you mention having 2 shots (without jacking the action) it makes more sense on toothed/clawed critters.
    Now for the eastern woodlands, if somebody had a double rifle .44mag or .30-30, that would be just downright cute.

    Yeah, now I’ll tell you what I has crossed my fevered mind several times. Ever heard of the Chiappa Triple Threat? If a guy was to sleeve that to 45-70……….

  • #33854
     Anonymous
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    I like the Ruger mod. 96 in 44 mag, light, short, pretty fast action time, and if one is short on time five rounds is likely more than you’ll get off before the critter is down, or you are. I’m not a speed shooter, nor a competition shooter.
    My all around rifle at this time, the one that goes with me everywhere I go is a model 92 clone in 357 mag, 24″ barrel and with my NOE 360-180WFN bullets at 1700-1725 has all the authority I need where I live. I would not hesitate to use it for black bear or deer, but for bear only I would most likely use my Henry 44 mag with a nice 240 gr cast at around 1700-1750fps leaving the barrel.
    For the most part, my favorite lever gun is the one I happen to have with me at the time.

  • #33856
     kens 
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    Goodsteel;n14685 wrote:

    Yeah, now I’ll tell you what I has crossed my fevered mind several times. Ever heard of the Chiappa Triple Threat? If a guy was to sleeve that to 45-70……….

    Tim,
    there is some things that fevered my mind also, and we are getting off track from the original lever gun topic.
    Can you open a new topic thread that presents our fevered mind concepts? and take this Chiappa thing along with it.

  • #33886
     Labradigger1 
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    No way I could pick just one. I love them all.

  • #33892
     Goodsteel 
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    The BLR is unique on so many levels as are all modern Browning rifles. From a gunsmiths perspective, there’s everybody else, and then there’s Browning. It was not JMB who designed these modern firearms, but I believe he would approve. The BLR is in a class of its own though. Simply BRILLIANT. The internal parts are completely held together with three presspins through the receiver. The parts inside are timed just like a fine watch, and very few know how to get in and out without messing up the timing myself being one of those who can (seriously, you can put the parts in, have correct headspace, and the rifle still won’t fire. Those gears have to hash EXACTLY right).
    A magazine fed, rotating bolt head rifle, with a large barrel shank, the BLR can take pressures far above that of its counterparts. Some have called it a lever operated bolt action. I disagree. Its the BLR, and its unlike anything else, just like the BAR, BPR, SA-22 and XXII. The Browning designs are always a gun apart from the norm.
    All firearms follow the same tracks, and are basically a modification, or better take on the same old designs, with very little different and wonderful ever being produced. Browning is different. However, I don’t look forward to any truely unique rifle designs coming out in the near future, especially in the lever gun world.

  • #33895
     Rattlesnake Charlie 
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    I grew up with a Savage 99E in .308 with a Bushnell 3 – 9 variable on it. Envied the neighbors old Marlin .22LR with octagon barrel (I’m a sucker for octagon barrels). My first lever action came about a decade ago, a youth Henry in .22 rimfire. Bought it so my grandchildren could shoot .22. They are grown, but I like that little rifle. While it is quite short it carries and handles like a dream. My next lever came when a friend ran into hard times and I bought his 1895 Marlin Cowboy with the long octagon barrel in .45-70. I do deplore that they put a plastic buttplate on it. Maybe some day I’ll get a steel shotgun buttplate on it. Recoils is a bit stiff in that light rifle. My most recent lever action is a Cimarron Arms 1873 in .357 mag that had the short stroke kit already installed before I bought it. Wow. Talk about fast. It is beautiful too. I am getting the itch for another Cimarron Arms rifle, and 1886 in .45-70. I looked at a current manufacture Winchester 1886, but didn’t like the sloppy wood to metal fit.

  • #33896
     JPHolla 
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    Doubles also had two complete mechanisms. If one side broke, the gun would still function. Also, all levers have much less camming power on extraction–even the modern BLR–in case of a stuck case.

  • #33898
     dragon813gt 
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    I can’t pick just one. It’s whatever I feel like shooting that day. Savage 99, you bet. Have them in 300 Savage, 308/358/375 Win, 30-30 and 250 Savage. They are the Cadillac of lever guns. Trekking though the woods w/ your hand cupped around the rounded bottom of the receiver is always a treat. And for me the 300 Savage is a soft shooter that’s more than enough for white tail.

    Marlins, yep have them to. Both 1894 and 1895/336. Those are in 357 Mag, 30-30, 356 Winchester and 35 Remington. I find myself grabbing the JM stamped 35 Remington the most. Not as handy as the 1884C. But packs a lot more power for not much more weight and size. The ease of takedown for cleaning is what draws me to them the most. They are a simple reliable rifle that work day in and day out.

    Shot a couple BLRs and didn’t care for them. They are inherently accurate but aren’t for me. I’m not a fan of top eject so I don’t own any Winchesters. May be blasphemy but the old ones are very unattractive in my eyes. Henry’s, I hate the fact that they don’t have a loading gate. I hate how much they weigh. But they are releasing one chambered in 327 Federal. As much as I said I wouldn’t buy one it’s looking like I’m going to buy one.

  • #33996
     WCM 
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    I guess I like my old Win 95 .405 with the rifle crescent butt plate.
    Yes it kills at both ends.
    I call it the hammer, It will slam a deer.
    Made in 1913 and has a perfect bore.

    Most all the blue is gone off of one side of the receiver.

    I still like to hunt with it.

    It makes me feel old.

    Proud I am still here.

  • #33998
     Goodsteel 
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    You’ve got me drooling over here……

  • #34001
     Rattlesnake Charlie 
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    Sometimes, nostalgia trumps practicality, functionality, and actual results. I have several of those in my gunsafe. Still, at this point, when it comes to levers, I like my Cimarron Arms replica 1873 in .357. It has beautiful wood and metal, wonderful fit, and magical balance. Close behind it is my 1895 Marlin Cowboy in .45-70. I do hate that plastic buttplate and safety.

  • #34145
     doc1876 
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    Ok, I have held off answering this long enough.

    Uberti Henrys repeater in .44-40. functions smooth as butter, and I hit what I am aiming at. I also can show up at an historical event in any Time period from 1861 to the turn of the century and fit in, although being shiny don’t hurt my feelings either.

  • #45160
     reloader762 
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    I once owned a Marlin 336 in 35 Rem.  I love that rifle but I had to sell it to help cover some expenses for my first born.   Later on I came into possession of a late model plain Jane Sav. 99 in 300 Sav. which I still have to this day.  It’s seen a couple boxes or factory ammo in the past 30 years or so but about all I ever shoot in it is cast lead which it does exceptionally well.

  • #45164
     Goodsteel 
    Keymaster
    • Gold
    • ★★★
    • Posts: 207
    • Comments: 2449
    • Overall: 2656

    Very fine rifle you have there!

  • #45743
     wingspar 
    Participant
    • Bronze
    • Posts: 0
    • Comments: 8
    • Overall: 8

    I own 2 Marlin 1894’s. One Remlin in .357 Magnum and one JM in .45 Colt. These are my only experience with lever action rifles. The JM has a much smoother action.

  • #45745
     Artful 
    Participant
    • Gold
    • ★★★
    • Posts: 187
    • Comments: 428
    • Overall: 615

    Wow my favorite –

    I dearly love my Savage 99-358, you can load it up to stomp bear or down to plink all day long with no pain.

    One of my favorite is my Marlin 39 in 22LR

    My biggest is a Marlin 45-70 but it’s little brother in 44 mag is not forgotten.  I occasionally still get the 336 in 30-30 out.

    Got a Winchester Big Bore 375 and an 88 in 308

    But today I’d say my little suppressed Rossi 92 in 38/357 is the current favorite -cheap to shoot as 22LR these days and in subsonic loads with a can on it’s just too much fun.

     

     

  • #45750
     Doc44 
    Participant
    • Bronze
    • Posts: 1
    • Comments: 36
    • Overall: 37

    In recent years I have aquired a variety of lever actions although I have not fully explored the potential of each. In a modern caliber it is hard to beat the BLR in 308. Pistol caliber thump the Henry 41 mag or Rossi 480 Ruger. I have fired and enjoyed Tim’s beautiful 1886 and Glenn’s 1895 in 405. The rifle I pull out to make a new convert to shooting and lever action fan is the Browning BL-22. This fast, accurate and light rifle puts a smile on any face. My wife liked mine so much I had to get her one too.

  • #68981
     kjohn 
    Member
    • Bronze
    • Posts: 0
    • Comments: 2
    • Overall: 2

    My first love is 94’s, in 30-30 and .32WS.  I have a Rossi 92 in 38/357 that has been slicked up.  It does work nice!  I also have a Chiappa 44/44mag.  I always go back to my trusty old 94’s.  One is a 1918 rifle I. .32WS, with a nice peep sight.  Nice old rifle to shoot.  The others are all 20″.

    One orphan I just took out the other day for a shoot is a 1920 Savage 99 takedown in 30-30.  Slick short stroke action, a true classic.  It s carbine length, not sure if it started out that way or not.  It was a real eyesore when I got it, but got a nice refinish job from my shooter buddy Deaner.  Smart looking little gun now!

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