Viewing 9 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #27524
      Anonymous
      Inactive
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 9
      • Comments: 28
      • Overall: 37

      I just received a Trapdoor barreled action. The rifeling looks new, clean and sharp with no pitting at all. One problem though, some time in the past a drill was used to put a divot in the chamber mouth where the rim would seat.
      I need to remove the barrel from the receiver to have it TIG welded and reamed out. So the barrel is threaded in to the receiver. What’s the best way to unthread them without marring the barrel or receiver?

    • #27529
      Goodsteel
      Keymaster
      • Gold
      • ★★★
      • Posts: 208
      • Comments: 2452
      • Overall: 2660

      I’ve never done one of these, but I would attack it just like any other rifle: Barrel vice and an action wrench. Same as usual.
      For the receiver wrench, you’ll probably have to mill a custom one. No big deal, just make sure it’s over built and fits the receiver well, and has a 2 foot long handle on it.
      For the barrel vice, get aluminum blocks about 1.25X3.0X1.0 Take two of them and bore a hole right down the middle that is the size of the barrel where you intend to hold it.
      To hold the barrel, put one of the blocks in the barrel vice with the half round hole facing up and running perpendicular to the vice. Put a pile of pure powdered confectioners sugar in the middle of the block. Set the barrel in there (you want to be as close to the receiver as possible).
      Pile up a mountain of sugar on top of the barrel and gently set the opposite block on top of it.
      Tighten the vice securely.
      Apply pressure to the handle of the wrench and unscrew the action.

      I suppose Larry would be a better source for knowledge on this matter as he may have had need to remove a barrel from one of these rifles before.

    • #27530
      Anonymous
      Inactive
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 9
      • Comments: 28
      • Overall: 37

      Thanks Tim.
      I’ve never removed or installed a barrel before except on a Remington 1858 .44 replica revolver. Just wrapped everything in rags then clamped it tight in the vice. I expect that was easy compared to a 130 year old rifle. The only machine tool I have is a cheap Chinese drill press. Time to put the ‘ol grey matter to work and figure out a simple barrel vice and receiver wrench.

      The powdered sugar use is interesting. Loctite uses some kind of sugar in their thread locking compounds.
      I work at a titanium mill and foundry. They also use sugar in the graphite molds as a binder. Once the molds are fired they are real hard.
      Funny thing is I’ve never thought of using sugar in this type of application. Good advice.

    • #27532
      Goodsteel
      Keymaster
      • Gold
      • ★★★
      • Posts: 208
      • Comments: 2452
      • Overall: 2660

      I don’t know why it works, but it does. I used to use perfectly machined aluminum blocks, but I found that they would get worn out and start slipping after a lot of use. Remington 700’s were always a bear on account of their tapered barrels and zero cylinder extension profiles.
      Finally in desperation I decided to try throwing something on there that would provide some grip to the blocks. Powdered sugar was the only thing handy. I did exactly as stated above, and broke loose a very stuck barrel. Nothing ever moved. I’ve been doing it ever since, and let me tell you, I’ve had a few mil-surps that have managed to get the barrel to spin in the blocks but the barrel does a squeaking CRUNCH when it goes which leaves you thinking “how in the blazes can sugar hold on so hard?!?!?!?”. It’s an amazingly powerful trick.
      Once the work is done, a wet cloth gently dissolves the sugar away and leaves……..nothing. Not a scratch. Not a blemish. Even on my highly blued barrels……..nothing.

      My motto is: “Get in. Get out. I was never here”. I really don’t know how to do that with barrel changes without powdered sugar.

    • #27540
      Larry Gibson
      Participant
      • Gold
      • ★★★
      • Posts: 55
      • Comments: 507
      • Overall: 562
      • Gold

      Make sure you use as long a length of barrel vise blocks as feasible. 3″+ is not too much. A TD barrel is soft and easy to ring.

      Larry Gibson

    • #27569
      chutesnreloads
      Participant
      • Silver
      • ★★
      • Posts: 4
      • Comments: 161
      • Overall: 165

      This may be a no no but I’ve used for a reciever wrench….a length of 2×4 with nylon rope.Tie a prusik knot around the reciever and it clinches down pretty snug and doesn’t mar the finish.Got the job done on a Savage 110.

    • #27629
      Anonymous
      Inactive
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 9
      • Comments: 28
      • Overall: 37

      Larry Gibson;n6456 wrote: Make sure you use as long a length of barrel vise blocks as feasible. 3″+ is not too much. A TD barrel is soft and easy to ring.

      Larry Gibson

      Ok, so let’s say I make a barrel wrench as described. The hole bored through the blocks is straight but the barrel is tapered. How do you get a secure clamp?

    • #27630
      Goodsteel
      Keymaster
      • Gold
      • ★★★
      • Posts: 208
      • Comments: 2452
      • Overall: 2660

      That’s what the powdered confectioners sugar is for.
      Cracked loose three Remington 700’s and a Mosin Negant last week using that trick. It’s not something I did once and say it works. I’m telling you this is a weekly kink that I use in the shop regularly.

    • #27634
      chutesnreloads
      Participant
      • Silver
      • ★★
      • Posts: 4
      • Comments: 161
      • Overall: 165

      Still need the barrel vise….the rope and 2×4 serves as the action wrench

    • #27653
      popper
      Participant
      • Silver
      • ★★
      • Posts: 1
      • Comments: 293
      • Overall: 294

      I’ve used 2×4 with smaller hole – then split – as a barrel vise to remove flash hider. Clamp down hard in your bench vise. yes, it took a long wrench on the FH.

Viewing 9 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

© 2017 Goodsteel Forum. Designed by Covalent Designs, LLC.