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    • #22415
      Sgt. Mike
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      When the British Empire entered World War I, it had an urgent need for rifles and contracts were placed with companies in the United States. In the case of the P14 rifle (P14= Pattern 14), Winchester and Remington were selected. When the U.S. entered the war, it had a similar extreme need for rifles this was a result of two factors the low serial number directive to not issue any more low serial numbers. The other factor is quite frankly like the BAR which was around the US did not want it’s rifle being captured. Rather than re-tool completely, the factories, under the close supervision of the US Army Ordnance Department, altered the design for caliber .30-06. Winchester produced the rifle at their New Haven, Connecticut plant and Remington at their main facility at Ilion, New York and at another plant in Eddystone, Pennsylvania.
      General Hatcher in his Hatcher’s Notebook contains a complete section on the U.S. Rifle of 1917 as it is correctly called (see pages 12-18 http://www.castpics.net/subsite2/Cla…20Notebook.pdf). The American Rifleman in 2012 had a EXCELLENT write up which I will not repeat or re-post but provide the link (http://www.americanrifleman.org/arti…17-us-enfield/)
      While I am posting links another good article is Dick Culver’s write up for the CMP (Civilian Marksmanship Program which replaced the Army DCM- Director of Civilian Marksmanship Program rather than regress I’ll leave those two program’s along and move on) the Link is here for the write up by Dick Culver (http://www.odcmp.org/503/rifle.pdf).
      By the end of the ‘Great War” and 2.5 million of these rifles produced there was talk of 1. replacing the 1903 with the 1917. 2. Using the 1917 for DCM National Matches which was tried only to have it rejected by the shooters. As such this usually found to be even more accurate IF left in it’s as originally manufactured barrel specifications. usually noted to be also stronger than the *GASP* 1903 and is the basis today for many magnum conversations. This trusty War horse was related to storage and Land Lease programs world wide. It has been stated that Sgt. York in his exploits was in possession of a M1917 and a M1911 when he captured a German machine gun next. Yet even he complained of the “Durn British” rifle not of it’s accuracy, strength, or reliability, but rather the grace of handling.

    • #22416
      Sgt. Mike
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      Like the M1903 and every American arm used for the Military each part is marked or coded to actual manufacture

      Part Markings For U.S. Rifle M1917

      PARTEDDYSTONEREMINGTON WINCHESTER
      BARRELE R W
      BARREL BAND UPPERE R W
      BARREL BAND LOWERE R W
      BOLTE R W
      BOLT STOP E R W
      BOLT STOP SPRING E R W
      BOLT STOP REST E R W
      BOLT SLEEVEE R W
      BUTTPLATENot MarkedR W
      BUTTPLATE TRAPE Not MarkedW
      COCKING PIECEE or “EN” R or “EN” W
      EJECTOR E R W
      EXTRACTORE R W
      FIRING PINE or “EN” R or “EN” W
      FLOOR PLATEE R W
      FLOOR PLATE RELEASE E R W
      FOLLOWER E R W
      SIGHT BASE FRONTE R W
      SIGHT INSERT FRONTE or Blank R W
      HANDGUARD LOWER (early only)E R W
      HANDGUARD UPPER (early only)E R W
      HANDGUARD RINGE R or Blank W
      MAGAZINE BOX E R W
      MAGAZINE SPRING E R W
      SIGHT ELEVATOR REARE R W
      SIGHT LEAF SPRING REAR E R W
      SIGHT SLIDE REARE R W
      SIGHT SLIDE TAB REARE Not MarkedW
      SAFETYE R W
      SAFETY COVER E R W
      SEAR E R W
      STOCK (at the tip of the forearm)E R W
      SWIVEL REAR BASEE R W
      SWIVEL SLING FRONTE Not MarkedNot Marked
      SWIVEL SLING REARE R W
      SWIVEL STACKINGE Not MarkedNot Marked
      TRIGGER E R W
      TRIGGER GUARDE R W
    • #23186
      Anonymous
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      The m-17 was a great Model . bid, strong and sturdy. Early in the war many were re activated by Make them In Grenade Launch.. I purchase one many years ago. . It was in a VFW hall. that they were selling. This model is all Arsenal re works. with a new O# barrel.. When I got It the Front site was Not attached and I f Re installed it
      To shoot. It was attached To a Jeep From what I read and Could be carried By hand . I have attached a Photo. For review

    • #27081
      Velocette
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      The ’17 Enfield aka US rifle of 1917 is a strong durable weapon that us usually as accurate at its shooter.

      They also make nice custom rifle for the patient home builder. Here is the result of a bit over a years effort.
      All work was done by hand. NO power tools were used. Alll metal and wood work was done by me except the
      blueing of the metal and the checkering.
      Mag well was shortened to 5 rds of 30-06, bolt straightened, ears removed & shaped to match Remington model 30 rear receiver,
      Pillar and epoxy bedded, Dayton Traister trigger & cock on opening, Shoots about 1″ at 100 yds if I do my part.

    • #27083
      bjornb
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      I shot Velocette’s rifle and can attest to both the accuracy and the workmanship (I shot it with the previous stock, which was no slouch either).

    • #27087
      Anonymous
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      Interesting information. A week or so ago a friend brought over a Winchester made 1917 that has been “sporterized”, and I use the term with kindness. He asked if I would build a rifle using the action and discard the rest of it. He wants to get into long range shooting, and mentioned the 300 Winchester Magnum. So far, I haven’t found a stock for it, but haven’t had time to do much searching. A barrel is not a problem of course, as there are plenty of them available. He is more or less leaving most of this to my discretion, so I’m leaning toward either walnut or laminate for the stock. Also, what are your thoughts on calibers other than the 300 Winchester? I have been mulling over something in 7 mm due to what I believe is better ballistic coefficiency. What say you?

    • #27088
      Velocette
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      Chipmaker, beware, removing the barrel from the ’17 Enfield can be quite difficult without the proper tools AND much patience.
      They are known to be VERY tight and difficult. Damage to the receiver is not unknown due to their tightness.

    • #27089
      Anonymous
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      Thank you, I have replaced several barrels but never tackled a 1917 before. Hardest one yet was a Stevens 325. All advice is appreciated.

    • #27091
      Scharfschuetze
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      I believe the Eddystone 1917s have the reputation of being very hard on the surface, which also makes ’em hard to D&T.

      For a good long range cartridge, it really is hard to beat the old Ought Six, although many of the serious long range shooters are using smaller diameter bullets now. Perhaps a 280 Remington or 6mm Remington might be good options and they would preclude extensive modifications to the rails and bolt face.

    • #27096
      Anonymous
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      Scharfschuetze;n5894 wrote: I believe the Eddystone 1917s have the reputation of being very hard on the surface, which also makes ’em hard to D&T.

      For a good long range cartridge, it really is hard to beat the old Ought Six, although many of the serious long range shooters are using smaller diameter bullets now. Perhaps a 280 Remington or 6mm Remington might be good options and they would preclude extensive modifications to the rails and bolt face.

      I agree on the ’06, if I were doing it for myself that is what it would be. I really don’t care much for the belted cartridges anyway. The ’06 will get the job done if the shooter is capable of doping wind and distance.

    • #27103
      Larry Gibson
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      Scharfschuetze;n5894 wrote: ………

      For a good long range cartridge, it really is hard to beat the old Ought Six, although many of the serious long range shooters are using smaller diameter bullets now. Perhaps a 280 Remington or 6mm Remington might be good options and they would preclude extensive modifications to the rails and bolt face.

      Yes the 6mms and 6.5s are the choice of most F class shooters and those sniper wannabe gamesmen in the various sniper competitions these days. The slightly flatter trajectory, lessor recoil and excellent quality and accurate bullets with the ability to clang clangers are their mainstays. The cons to them are much shorter practical barrel life and poorer terminal ballistics at LR (past 600 yards). A properly built ’06 will still get you to 1400 yards with a 175 gr MK or 178 VLD and have the ability to do other than just “clang steel”.

      Larry Gibson

    • #27118
      Reg
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      Removing the barrel can be a bearcat but if you will put it in a receiver mandrel, hold the barrel in a steady rest then cut a groove right in front of the receiver ring right below the minimum diameter of the extension they usually come right off. I understand they used a early hydrolic machine to install them and it was difficult to control the actual force applied.
      Soak the removed receiver in a small can of gas then quickly remove and wipe dry. If there are any cracks in the forward receiver ring they will show as a wet streak. This is common on the Eddystones more so than Remington’s or Winchesters.

    • #27119
      Reg
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      Do check the Eddystones for receiver cracks. They are not common but are out there.

    • #27593
      Daniel
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      My first big game rifle was a M1917 Winchester. I gave $26.00 for it from the Western Auto Store when I was 14 years old. With savings in pocket, the man in the store took me to the back room and let me pick my gun from one of several cases of rifles that were nothing more than paper wrapped gobs of grease. Never did get all the cosmoline out of that gun but sure wish I still had it today. It was pristine.

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