This topic contains 4 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Artful 4 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #22597
     Artful 
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    https://www.yahoo.com/technology/news/dutch-police-training-eagles-grab-145800973.html

    Technology

    Dutch police are training eagles to grab drones from the sky

    Stan Schroeder,Mashable 4 hours ago
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HifO-ebmE1s
    Remember those two sassy eagles that snatched a DJI Phantom 3 drone out of the air last last year, thinking it was a meal? It turns out they were on to something.
    The Dutch police are training eagles to grab rogue drones from the sky and bring them to justice. Watch for yourself in the video above, which police released on Sunday.
    See also: The new rules for drones: What you need to know

    The video shows an eagle clutching a drone midair and taking it down a few feet. However, this leaves open the possibility of birds getting hurt by drones’ robot blades; a Dutch police spokesperson said they are looking into ways to protect the eagles from injuries, Engadget reported.
    The Dutch police partnered with Denmark-based raptor training company Guard From Above to train eagles to go after drones, according to a statement on the National Police Corps’ website.
    The police will decide whether eagles are an appropriate method to prevent unwanted drone use “in a few months.”
    The Dutch police are also looking into other ways to keep unwanted or dangerous drones out of the sky, including hacking and taking over their control signals and using safety nets.
    We’ve seen plenty of other approaches to taking out drones, too. The Tokyo Metropolitan Police Department tackled the drone problem by using a net-wielding drone to take down other drones. And a gun from Battelle called DroneDefender fires an invisible beam that can take down small drones.
    But for now, the battle for our skies rages on.

  • #22601
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    VW is making backing a trailer easier …. No, Really easy

  • #22629
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    http://boston.cbslocal.com/2016/02/01/solar-d-sunscreen-skin-cancer-vitamin-d/

    BOSTON (CBS) – Many people are getting the message loud and clear. That sunscreen helps protect you against skin cancer. But some experts say all that sunscreen is creating another problem.
    “That is the major cause for the vitamin D epidemic worldwide,” says Dr. Michael F. Holick, an endocrinologist at the BU School of Medicine.
    “Sunscreen absorbs ultraviolet light and ultraviolet light makes vitamin D in your skin, and if you put a sunscreen on with an SPF of 30 and it absorbs about 97-98% of the UV light, it will reduce the ability to make vitamin D in your skin by 97-98%,” says Dr. Willett.
    That can lead to a host of problems including rickets, osteoporosis, diabetes, and memory loss.
    So how can we get the cancer blocking effects of sunscreen without depriving our bodies of vitamin D? Solar D. A specially formulated sunscreen that blocks harmful ultraviolet rays but allows the vitamin D-permitting rays to get through to your skin.
    Dr. Holick helped design the product and says research shows it works.
    “You can have your cake and eat it too is to take advantage of the sun protection factor as well as making some vitamin D in your skin,” says Dr. Holick.
    Solar D has been approved by the FDA and should be available on store shelves in the United States this spring. With an SPF of 30, it is expected to cost about the same as traditional sunscreens.

    This is why I don’t trust big Pharma – we could all just wear hats and long sleeve shirts…:cool: don’t forget your shades 😉

  • #22733
     Artful 
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    http://news.yahoo.com/3d-printed-semi-automatic-weapon-221515029.html
    For most people, a run-of-the-mill DIY project might involve constructing that backyard shed they’ve always wanted or painting the bathroom. In the case of a YouTube user known simply as Derwood, he’d prefer spending his weekend 3D printing a working semi-automatic weapon; within the boundaries of the law, of course. Shown off via a YouTube video published late last month, Derwood’s creation is self-described as a “mostly” 3D-printed firearm with roughly 95 percent of the construction done through prints. The resulting product (seen in the video below) is completely void of a serial number, impossible to trace back to Derwood, and entirely legal — which is perhaps its most controversial feature.
    Though Derwood’s 3D-printed automatic weapon (dubbed the Shuty-MP1) isn’t the first of its kind to make waves, he does claim he’s the first to combine 3D-printed parts with store-bought components. With 95 percent of the weapon coming by way of a 3D printer, the West Virginia native opted to use a real Glock barrel along with a metal hammer, firing pins, bolts, and springs to complete its construction. Although the gun boasts elements of a store-bought gun, the fact each component is merely an accessory (meaning they require an actual gun for use) allows the finished product to remain legal.
    “No one had ever tried to get a semi-automatic 3D printed gun working before…I’m just one of those types, I like to find new things that people say can’t be done,” Derwood tells Wired. “It’s simple, but it works. The gun shoots great.”
    Derwood’s decision to manufacture this home-built semi-auto stems purely from a desire to challenge his engineering skills — aside from manufacturing it to serve as a big middle finger to those pushing gun control laws. Because of this, he in no way intends to share his plans online (something which the State Department has recently begun cracking down on) and further points out that criminals shouldn’t even be interested in his creation. Why? After successively firing roughly 18 rounds, the printed part surrounding the gun’s barrel starts to melt and change its shape unless the shooter allows it to cool.
    “If you keep shooting, it’s going to fail,” he continues. ” That makes it not such a desired weapon for a criminal.”
    Although Derwood feels it’s not an ideal weapon of choice for a criminal, 18 consecutive rounds could still do some damage. In a separately published video, Derwood displays the gun’s firing power, shooting eight 9mm rounds towards three soda cans sitting next to a piece of plywood. If you happened to watch the video under the assumption he was using a real, traditionally constructed gun, you’d have no idea most of the thing was developed with a 3D printer. We aren’t sure if that’s impressive or alarming.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JNCOLGOF3Dk

  • #22734
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    http://www.cnn.com/2016/02/04/politi…ort/index.html
    Washington (CNN)The military risks committing itself to buying billions of dollars of F-35 fighter jets before they have demonstrated they are fit for combat, a new Pentagon report warns.

    The development of the Joint Strike Fighter F-35, a fifth-generation stealth jet, has been beset by spiraling costs and schedule delays. The program’s price tag is nearly $400 billion for 2,457 planes — almost twice the initial estimate.To drive down costs and benefit from larger economies of scale, the Pentagon has sought to pool planned purchases through a “block buy” of hundreds of aircraft from the F-35’s manufacturer, Lockheed Martin, according to the report by the Pentagon’s Director of Operational Test and Evaluation, J. Michael Gilmore.

    he report cautions that these efforts to curb costs have created a situation in which the U.S. could be committed “to procuring as many as 270 U.S. aircraft” before “operational testing is complete.”

    The report, which examines programs that were tested in 2015, argues that such a strategy raises numerous concerns, pointing out that defense officials connected to the program have said that “essentially every aircraft bought to date requires modifications prior to use in combat.”

    The report also asks whether the new arrangement will provide the “needed incentives” to the defense contractor “to correct an already substantial list of deficiencies in performance, a list that will only lengthen” as testing continues.

    In response, Lockheed Martin said in a statement that “There were no surprises in the report; all of the issues mentioned are well-known.”

    The company pointed out that the report showed that the Marine Corps variant of the F-35 in July had met the minimum requirements for being deployable in an operation.

    Lockheed Martin also said that the program was 80% complete but acknowledged that “there are known deficiencies that must be corrected.”

    The Pentagon report also raises legal concerns, asking whether the “block buy” strategy is “consistent” with administration policy and with the intent of U.S. law, which the report explains stipulates that initial testing must be completed and the test results provided to Congress before full production of the fighters can begin.

    RELATED: The F-35: is it worth the cost?

    Arizona Republican John McCain, chairman of the Senate Armed Services committee, blasted the block buy strategy, telling CNN that it “leaves taxpayers on the hook for expensive changes to fix problems discovered late in production. And it’s one of the reasons that the F-35 is a shining example of how not to conduct a major acquisition program.”

    The single-seat F-35 Joint Strike Fighter is intended to conduct air-to-air combat, air-to-ground strikes, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions.

    It’s designed to allow pilots to immediately share data with one another and their commanders; it can penetrate enemy territory without being detected by radar; and its specialized helmet display gives pilots a 360-degree view of their surroundings.

    The fighter is intended for use by the U.S. Air Force, the U.S. Navy, the U.S. Marine Corps and 10 foreign countries.

    http://www.cnn.com/2015/09/15/politics/f-35-report-question-readiness/

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