This topic contains 17 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  oldblinddog 3 years, 2 months ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #24304
     MTtimberline 
    Participant
    • Bronze
    • Posts: 3
    • Comments: 37
    • Overall: 40

    I’m currently researching for a new scope purchase and was contemplating on which reticle to go with. I only have experience with the duplex style, but am currently leaning towards the target dot with target torrent setup. I was wondering if anyone had good or bad experiences with the target dot and what other people’s preferences for reticle choice. This will probably be on a variable scope in the 6-18 or 6.5-20 range, mostly for target use with the occasional prairie dog outing.

  • #24311
     Sgt. Mike 
    Participant
    • Gold
    • ★★★
    • Posts: 84
    • Comments: 789
    • Overall: 873

    simple is always better in my opinion. I like the target dot. as well as a regular Duplex

    The old Redfield (before they went outta business) accu-trac with ranging was a rock solid reticle worked very well —- simple

  • #24326
     Newt 
    Participant
    • Bronze
    • Posts: 3
    • Comments: 40
    • Overall: 43

    I recently got a new scope for my .223 bolt gun. Weaver 6×18-44 Main reason I got it, other than cost, was the reticle. It has very thin/fine hairs transitioning to thicker ones further away from zero than most duplex scopes. They only cover 1/4″ at 100 yards. For target work they were a huge step up as I can now aim at a smaller area. Its my opinion that for target work you want as small a dot/line as you can get. It might be harder to see during some hunting situations, but for targets the smaller point of aim will always produce the smaller groups, at least for me.

  • #24329
     skeettx 
    Participant
    • Silver
    • ★★
    • Posts: 16
    • Comments: 197
    • Overall: 213

    I like the 1/8 minute dot

  • #24340
     Doc Highwall 
    Participant
    • Silver
    • ★★
    • Posts: 8
    • Comments: 123
    • Overall: 131

    I have several scopes with the 1/8 min dot, and the dot can be hard to see after a long shooting session like a 40 shot match with sighters. The older you get the more you notice things like you vision not being what it use to be.

    What I did was purchase a eye piece booster that cleared up the reticle and made longer shooting sessions possible.
    This is what I purchased: http://www.bulzeyepro.com/

  • #24377
     Kevin S 
    Participant
    • Bronze
    • Posts: 14
    • Comments: 58
    • Overall: 72

    Nawt What model of Weaver did you get?

  • #24421
     MTtimberline 
    Participant
    • Bronze
    • Posts: 3
    • Comments: 37
    • Overall: 40

    The more I think about it, I’m sure I’m going to look around for a leupold vx-3 6.5-20 target dot or similar.

  • #24447
     DeadWoodDan 
    Participant
    • Bronze
    • Posts: 11
    • Comments: 80
    • Overall: 91

    if you are even serious about PD hunting with it, I would recommend a mil dot or BDC recticle. You will appreciate having hold overs if anything else. Check and watch Vortex, a buddy put me on to them and they seem to be the latest fad and best band for the buck for all around and warranty. If just for paper shooting can’t beat a Weaver T24 or 36 can be had for less money if found used

  • #24542
     Gofaaast 
    Participant
    • Bronze
    • Posts: 1
    • Comments: 5
    • Overall: 6

    I have 2 Burris Fullfield scopes that have the Balistic Plex E1 MV reticle, Burris model #200340. They now offer the same scope with side focus model #20341 These recticles match the bullet drop of my .17 REM and 22/250 loads within a couple inches out past 600 yards, and also have windage dots.. I feel the glass is a couple notches below VX3 Leupold and a notch below Nikon Monarch and have a couple of these as well. I have less than $700 in the pair of Burris scopes, so they offer value IMO. My favorite reticle for target shooting is my fine cross hair Monarch. For hunting and ringing the steel targets at all distances, I love my 2 E1 MV reticles . I had a weaver TD recticle years ago that I never liked. It was difficult to acquire coyotes fast when in worked fields, and the dot was to big IMO to punch paper.

  • #25013
     MTtimberline 
    Participant
    • Bronze
    • Posts: 3
    • Comments: 37
    • Overall: 40

    I was looking at some used Weaver T36 ‘s when I came across a Weaver T36 XR with Target dot on clearance from Midway with free shipping for less money than the used ones were going for. I decided to get it and give the Weaver a try for my target shooting as that is my main focus at the moment. After I’m done my load development and groups, I can always swap the target scope to another rifle and get a variable setup for varmit shooting later on. Why not end up with both? Thanks for the input so far.

  • #25814
     Velocette 
    Participant
    • Bronze
    • Posts: 2
    • Comments: 8
    • Overall: 10

    If you are using it primarily for target shooting, a 1/8″ dot with fine crosshairs like Leupold uses in their target scope is good. I’ve found that after a long match (over 100 rds slow fire) the dot can get a bit hazy. The crosshairs seem to help at that time. I use a 25x Leupold with the 1/8″ dot and fine crosshairs for smallbore prone and a 6.5 ~ 20 Zeiss for high power (TR-S) with fine crosshairs. Because the high power rifle is used for offhand and sitting, the power variation is valuable and the crosshairs are adequate for slow fire.

  • #25856
     MTtimberline 
    Participant
    • Bronze
    • Posts: 3
    • Comments: 37
    • Overall: 40

    I used the Weaver T-36 for the first time today. I put it on my Rem 700 .22-250 for some load development. I am really liking this scope so far but must say that it will take some getting used to compared to what I’m used to. First shot after installing it was 2 inches to the left and four inches low. After adjusting the turrets second shot was dead center at point of aim. The wind was starting to blow pretty good so I didn’t do much for groups with that rifle. I noticed it was easier to try to keep both eyes open until the target was required with the higher magnification. I will later put a variable more suitable for a varmit application after I have developed my loads for this rifle. I also put a cheaper scope I already had on a Rem 700 .30-06 I had purchased for the action for a project. I am now using it to learn more about shooting cast in rifles. The scope was not adjusting but I was very surprised and pleased with the groups when using a single aiming point. Looks like I’m on the hunt for another scope. Maybe I’ll come across a used T-10 or T-16.

  • #25872
     Smoke4320 
    Participant
    • Silver
    • ★★
    • Posts: 11
    • Comments: 140
    • Overall: 151

    for longer distance target shooting 500 to 1000 yds I much prefer a fine crosshair . It will cover less area so I get a more accurate aimpoint..
    always been good at adding Kentucky windage … like to keep things as simple as possible

  • #25879
     popper 
    Participant
    • Silver
    • ★★
    • Posts: 1
    • Comments: 293
    • Overall: 294

    Nikon BDC.

  • #25895
     Scharfschuetze 
    Participant
    • Silver
    • ★★
    • Posts: 3
    • Comments: 190
    • Overall: 193

    My military experience is probably talking here, but a good mil dot scope can substitute for a dot reticle and a straight cross hair reticle. The mil dots can be used as an aiming dot or for windage hold offs and trajectory compensation in addition to their use as a ranging tool.

    1. Use any of the dots for your dot reticle and zero accordingly for deflection and elevation offsets, just over 3 1/2 MOA between centers on the mil dots.

    2. For really precise bullseye shooting just place your vertical line/wire to the left or right of the bullseye and your horizontal wire/line above or below the bullseye. Now you have two points of reference on the bullseye for maximum precision. NRA bullseye targets have a known MOA measurement so you just offset your zero to impact the X Ring. On the NRA 600 yard target, that makes an offset just shy of 3 MOA or just over 1 Mil. If you are using a non standard bullseye, then it is easy to measure it and do the math to ascertain your vertical and deflection adjustments.

    3. Using No. 2 above, you can also (with an accurate rifle) turn your bullseye into four reference points and four groups by holding left & right, left and low, right and high and right and low (in any order) when the rifle is zeroed to the center of the cross hairs. Doing this you will have groups at 2, 4, 8 and 10 a little out from the black. Saves trips down range to paste bullet holes and they are easy to see through your spotting scope.

  • #25907
     Larry Gibson 
    Participant
    • Gold
    • ★★★
    • Posts: 50
    • Comments: 503
    • Overall: 553
    • Gold

    Concur with Scharfschuetze’s techniques for many scopes. I have used them with various scopes.

    For the 6×18 or 6.5×20 power scopes the OP mentions the target turrets are definitely worth having and using. Since at 18 and 20X target definition should be such that very precise aiming can be done the reticle choice, for me, depends on the shape of the target used. Dots seem to be a choice for higher powered scopes using bullseye or round targets but I’ve not found them to be any more precise than a fine cross hair or Duplex with fine cross hair center, especially if you have a precise aiming point such as the center of the “X” on a bullseye or the tip of a diamond or a specific spot on a varmint. However, my most used scopes for precision shooting are a T-16, Leupold 6,5×20 and a Bausch & Lomb 6×24, all with duplex reticles. The choice these days for target shooting (BR, F class, etc.) is a much higher power such as 35 – 45. With such I see the choice of reticle varies from a plain fine crosshair to a 1/8 moa dot, sometimes smaller.

    When shooting groups on a BR type target (1″ black square with a whit circle or square center with score rings below) I hold the vertical cross hair on the right edge of the black square and the horizontal cross hair on the bottom edge of the black square giving a precise aiming point. Some will “square” the black square cutting it into 4 quarters but I never found that as precise. I also like to use a diamond 1″ or 3/4″ square and aim at the very bottom tip of the diamond. This last Sunday I shot a CBA match using the 6.5×24 B&L. I had no problem seeing the “X” dot ( .072″ diameter) at 200 yards with 24X. It also is readily visible with the 20X on the Leupold unless there is very heavy boiling mirage.

    I suppose if I continue CBA competition (it is fun but for me it is a long drive (3+ hrs) to the match just to shoot 40 shots for record) a Weaver T36 will be bought. Not sure about the reticle at this time but I might try the dot.

    Larry Gibson

  • #25909
     dverna 
    Participant
    • Bronze
    • Posts: 5
    • Comments: 81
    • Overall: 86

    I have two mil dot scopes. The ease of ranging and hold over/windage makes them my preferred scopes.

    How we define “target” scope can sway our choices. But if you can, shoot a bunch of different types and determine what YOU prefer.

  • #25924
     oldblinddog 
    Participant
    • Silver
    • ★★
    • Posts: 4
    • Comments: 110
    • Overall: 114

    I use a Weaver T36 with 1/8 minute dot on a Remington 40X in USBR 50 M benchrest. The dot is the same size as the 10 ring at that distance. Fill the circle with the dot. I shoot Eley Tenex through it.

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

© 2017 Goodsteel Forum. Designed by Covalent Designs, LLC.

Log in with your credentials

or    

Forgot your details?

Create Account

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us by clicking the button below.

Contact Us