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    • #22890
      Reg
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      I know there are a few of these little made up rifles out there and after reading the writings of deHass I decided to make one up. At first , not knowing all there was to get into it seemed simple to just alter the factory breech block, replace the barrel, modify the extractor and go for it.
      It turned out to be not quite that simple.
      All metal work was just standard going, the learning curve was in what it took to properly support the cartridge.
      Pressure and safety wise the little Favorite action in on the minimum side for even the high Velocity .22 rim fire, it actually came from the day when most .22 rimfire shells were loaded with black powder and the early smokeless powders were also at much lower pressure than what things can operate now.

      Without going in to great detail we basically wound up replacing all the screws with new heat treated screws made from O-2 tool steel and a new breech block was made up from 1155 carbon steel and left in the natural soft state but fitted very and I do mean very tightly to the radius of the action where the original breech block fitted. The breech block was lapped into place and now everything locks into place with a nice snap to it but there again not excessively. It has also been fitted with a Mann-Neidner firing pin.

      Lock up wise I now feel it is safe enough to getting back to accuracy testing. It did show good potential before. We have test fired it with slightly hotter loads than gave trouble before and have noticed no looseness or stretching what ever.

      What we started with was a .32 rimfire rifle that had actually been run over by a truck breaking off both the upper and lower tangs. Welding the tangs back on showed us that even though the action was a thin shell casting it did weld like it was more of a early form of cast steel rather than a cast iron. Had it proven to have been a cast iron, we never would have attempted the project.
      The barrel came from Numrich, it was a factory new barrel from one of the old Marlin Lever Rifles in .30 carbine. The wood came from Ray Reichter when he was operating out of Fort Garland many years back and was called Franchett, I think a version of California Claro. The scope is actually quite neat. , a Maxwell Smith G88 made in Los Angles back in 1946 or so and it has a Listchert Varmint Master power booster on the front. I could be wrong on this but I think it works out to about 8 power.

      Will try to write up more on the actual conversion especially of the breech block and also how it shoots.

      πŸ˜‰

    • #22954
      Alphawolf45
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      I scratch built two Favorites .Think they were like the 5th and 6th rifles I built from scratch and I think I spent a grand total of 3 weeks building the two of them..They’re not even half as nice as that one you have there. Beautiful chunk of wood you used….I have 3 or 4 old Favorite actions in my junk drawer. One had its upper tang brazed on with brass rod which pretty well ruined it for anything short of a paper weight.. I didn’t do the brazing but I would not have guessed that it could be welded.. I have thought a time or two I would like to build the Stevens Side Plate version since theyre sorta rare…My only interest is in the old guns. Glad to see this one done up so nicely.

    • #23009
      Reg
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      Thank you Sir for the kind words but really if the scratch builds you refer to are of those shown on the internet you do not have to play second fiddle to anyone !!!
      I agree completely, the older guns are where my interest lies and through the years I have been lucky enough to not only come up with a few original complete unmolested rifles but I cabbaged onto some that had pitifully abused. These I have in some cases brought back to at least what they were and in a few cases tried to go on and even bring them to a higher level. While I have done quite a few rebuilds I have only done one action from a kit, a Farrow from one of those Storey kits from a few years back and the only scratch made action is a very unique cylindrical breech block action that I will be reporting soon as I finish the woodwork and blue it. Wish I could say I dreamed it up but the pat on the back for that one actually goes to a young fellow , Mathew Bryant, I think currently living over in Delta. We switched e-mails and servers a few weeks ago so have temporally lost contact with him but will re contact soon as possible. He is working on another unique “bunny gun” idea I want to see how it works out as finished.
      Yes, it was nice wood. I like stock making but am slooooooowwww at it. I figured since I spend so much time at it, it may as well make it count.

      A couple more pics of the Favorite added, learning how to post pics here. Looks like its actually a very good and simple system, just different is all.
      Will get back to shooting this one as soon as a few of those 3 and 4 foot drifts melt off the range.

    • #23016
      RKing22
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      Beautiful little rifle! I see a palm rest socket ,I think ? Case colors are wonderful, did you do the case color or Turnbull, or ?? Can’t wait to see more!

    • #23017
      Goodsteel
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      Really amazing work REG as usual! I’m glad to see the rest of the story with this rifle!

      Sorry about the different picture posting system. I went with Vbulliten software, hoping it would be what I’m used to, but sadly, it’s still different. The good news is, when you get the hang of it, the pictures are really fantastic full page, and I actually like it better. I wrote a sticky in the main forum for how to do it. Give it a look see. Maybe it will help a little.

    • #23158
      Alphawolf45
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      Reg
      ‘Course now that I have the interest in competition, repeating rifles are what I need…When I get caught up I will be working on a sort of cylindrical breech repeater..Its the Triplett and Scott rifle used briefly in the civil war..Easy scratch build aside from a crazy camming extractor.You might consider building one of those in the future and we can compare notes..I’ll have to build mine as a .22 but originally they were 50 caliber rimfire, black powder of course..

    • #23319
      Reg
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      Rking22, no, what you see on the bottom of the forend is a copper plate. Something to bed the forearm screw into but the thought of a palm rest is not out of the question.
      The colors ? Am ashamed to admit it but it was all done with a torch. 99 percent of the time it comes out looking like you know what but a fellow was telling me of a different way to do it, gave it a try and I would call it better than the normal job but I still prefer the old ways of doing things. There is a difference.

      Tim, please do not misunderstand me. No complaints abut the photo system at all, just a bit different and one has to learn how but then again, we are here to learn so there is nothing wrong with it. Actually I think it is quite a bit easier than some I have used.

      Alphawolf45, Would like to see the action you speak of. I was a strong follower of deHass back in the day, have all of his books ( most signed !! ) and couldn’t wait for the next one to come out. The study of the actions from of the day is not only looking at what was on the market and being thought of but a study of man’s ingenuity in over coming the difficulties of the time. Also most are really easy to duplicate.

    • #23321
      Goodsteel
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      I’ve seen this action that Alphawolf45 mentions a few weeks ago. Makes me want to go home with my tail between my legs. You guys sure know how to keep a guy humble. LOL!

    • #23333
      Reg
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      [ATTACH=CONFIG]temp_147_1454963989862_482[/ATTACH] Am enclosing a few pics of the new breech block made up for the Favorite. Am still using the origional link but have replaced the link pins with new ones made from hardened dowel pins. You can clearly see the Mann-Neidner firing pin. Block was made from 1155 carbon steel or “plow steel” as some call it . It isn’t used much these days but was a big agracultural steel not that many years ago. It was chosen because I felt there was no need to harden it as it was to be used and for it’s toughness and I thought it would show good wear charistics with very little elongation.
      When the little rifle was first made up we quickly found that even with the breech block set up we thought good enough ( guessed wrong on that one ) wasn’t.
      The breech block pivot screw and the two link pins due to the overall looseness of the action simpley let too much slack build up and also the parts them selfs were soft so everything just bent under pressure letting excessive head space inter into the game after only a few shots. The link pins are now dowel pins and the breech block pivot screw is now from 0-1 tool steel @ Rc 40, temper drawn.
      Basiclly because we were getting very good bunny gun accuracy from the little rifle and so th ought we sure didn’t want to give up on the project so we just started with the first part that failed and kept improving each part until we are where we are now.
      Part of the final testing was with a few loads I wouldn’t reccomend to my worst enemy, it did just fine. The rifle was held in a tire by the way !!!
      The breech block at first was only bearing properly on one side allowing the block to twist with the fireing. Not much but enough. The new block is a perfect, lapped fit and bears 100 percent.
      The blank from which this block was made was from a bunch I made up years ago to make replacement breech blocks for the Stevens 44, it had enough “meat” on it there was plenty to cut down. The shape and arrangement of the parts was a concept used by a gunsmith named Hubalac (Hubalack ? ) back in the 1920’s and 30’s. The gas escape hole is clearly shown on the top and is part of the success of how the conversion works.
      The Mann-neidner firing pin system is the best system in my book and I feel it should be used where ever possible. I have used it in High Walls, Low walls, Stevens of all types, any where I could. You cannot be safe enough.

    • #23373
      ZmanWakeForest
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      Reg, this is an absolutely gorgeous piece. A great post as well!

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