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    • #46521
      Butch Wax
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      I was thinking I made a mistake buying a Lee double cavity mould in 452-255gr RF, but I spoke too soon! I was fussin’ and carrying on because it wasn’t filling out right snd stuff. So I stopped. Took a break. Cleaned the mould again. Smoked it up. And tried again.

      After dropping 150 I learned AGAIN it ain’t iron! It’s aluminum! It’s fussy! But its going to be fine. Now I have the Lee 200gr and 255gr versions of their RNFP for my 45Colt and life is good again.

      I spoke too soon.☺

    • #46554
      Butch Wax
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      SITREP:

      Loaded up a few with 6gr Red Dot. Warm, but far from hot. Sized .452″, [.451″ bore].

      15 rounds at 15yds. Tight, centered, and 1″ low. Multiple times in same hole, or fighting for it. Good on paper.

      First two inches of the bore was coated in moderate leading. Minor leading going on toward the muzzle. My leading curse continues. Oh well….

    • #46560
      Goodsteel
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      Good deal. Glad it worked out for you!!! Persistence goes with lead casting like water with coffee grounds.

    • #46735
      Butch Wax
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      <p style=”text-align: left;”>Well I am persistent anyway, but that’s about to change.</p>
      The 255gr cast well. They size correctly, but the lube grooves are far to small and apparently insufficient to lube the bullet correctly. The 200gr with one lube groove does not have this issue.  Same lube, metal, and sizing.  Bullets that are pretty, but don’t act right don’t get used around here. The 255gr mould is in the box of moulds that “Cast, but ain’t right”

      Same mould in the .429″ model casts small. Good looking bullet, but usless. Lyman 358665 is the same. Casts good but too small.

      Many moulds are in the “cast, but ain’t right” box now. Can’t get decent metal in the area I live in. And it often is crap scrap that I find here. Pathetic.

      So I am not going to be casting much anymore. I put the pencil to it and based upon min. wage being factored into the cost of casting, lubing/sizing it costs me 48% more to cast my own than to buy bullets someone else sweated over to make. Don’t need to hit me in the head to figure it out. Unless I’m feeling nostalgic for a bullet from say a 1904 design, I am no longer gonna fire up the pot. Waste of my time and money.

    • #46737
      Goodsteel
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      I put the pencil to it and based upon min. wage being factored into the cost of casting

      You did WHAT???? That sir is the one thing a bullet caster is never supposed to do. LOL!

      I agree to a certain extent. Casting bullets is time consuming, and expensive, but for me at least, I find some inexplicable joy in casting bullets. It helps order my thoughts, and is something I do when I’m too sick or tired to do anything else.

      That said, I’ve slowed down a lot. It’s just too dam hard to get clean, cheap, COWW lead. Things were different back when I could back my truck up to a garage and ask if they had any wheel weights they need hauled off and the manager would just point at three level full buckets and I’d load them up and away I’d go. I never ingotized them. The COWW were my ingots!!! Now I have to carefully scrape through the weights and test every single one of them for fear of getting zink in the mix, and I pay dearly for the opportunity.

      Meanwhile, just down the road at Academy Sports, there are rows and rows of boxes full of gleaming Hornady bullets ready to go, and every one of them will deliver precision I will never get from my cast bullets…….

      I’m still casting, but until they ease up on the dam lead restrictions, I think jacketed bullets are going to become a larger and larger part of my personal shooting fodder.

      Sucks, but that’s the truth. Straight up. No salt. No lime.

    • #46739
      Butch Wax
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      Aside from three years sniper time in the S.E. Asian War Games where Nixon made sure we got second place, I’ve been casting for 57 years. Lead alloy is either garbage or you pay the premium for certified metal. I’m simply too tired to fight it anymore. So someone else can get lead spatter on em and sit and feed the lubrication/sizing tool. If you calculate your time with the components cost, it is cheaper to simply buy cast or copper plated bullets.

    • #46740
      kens
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      Seems to me like it depends on the day. some days casting is just frustrating, some days every one casts good.

      A lot of that depends on the caliber and weights. .308 cal and smaller is cheaper/easier to buy ammo, but when you get into things like .35cal rifle and upwards, bought ammo is dreadfully expensive.

      9mm pistol is too cheap to buy to mess with casting. .45acp is on the fence. .44/45 revolver is expensive to buy.

      Same with shotgun. If you are happy with WalMart 100 round packs of 12ga, 1 oz 8 shot, then you are fine to buy.

      BUT, if you want 12ga with a full house 1 1/4 oz load, your gonna pay dearly for it., if they have it.

      Same with 20ga, if you can use 7/8 oz of #8, then you are fine, but if you want 20ga full load 1 oz, then the price is high, and inventory low.

    • #46741
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      Butch Wax, what lube are you using? I’ve had great success with Carnuba Red, even at rifle velocities. I use Bullshop’s Lo-Tak because I bought like 20 lbs when they needed to move it and get out of AK. Been working fine in mid-range 9mm and .38 spl. I’ve not yet tried it on full bore 44 mag.

    • #46742
      Butch Wax
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      I’ve used multiple types of lube but its made little difference. My alloy is crap. And I’m not going to spend a bunch of coin on certified metal. Nope, I’m pretty much worn out on casting these days.

    • #46743
      kens
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      Has anyone tried the reclaimed shot from Rotometals? they offer free shipping for some purchases.

      I wanting some myself.

    • #46744
      GhostHawk
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      I don’t believe you can put a per hour charge on your time. Its a HOBBY.

      If it is not for you, then yes, buy jacketed. By all means.

       

      Me I will never give up my casting pot.

       

      And you don’t have to buy #2 from Rotometals to get decent alloy.

      You do sometimes have to make your load fit what your shooting. So if your pushing it too hard you may want to ease it off a little. Or buy Jacketed. Your call.

       

      For me, 50% range scrap, 50% Clip on wheel Weights and add 1% tin gives me a good performing alloy that works in pretty much everything I shoot.

       

      From there it is all about the other variables. Load, lube, etc.

    • #46745
      Butch Wax
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      <p style=”text-align: left;”>Well for me its an issue of being an endeavor of diminishing returns. Last few years lead has become more difficult to obtain, and yet when you can find it the metal is often contaminated. The so-called clip on wheel weights are oftentimes a disastrous mixture of usless debris. Resources in my area are nill. Not one single tire shop will deal with you. Scrapyards won’t either. You must turn to the internet and it’s pack of wolves waiting to fleece you.</p>
      No, I’ve struggled the last few years with often poor results. After nearly 6 decades of casting, I’m setting my ladle aside and someone else can get lead and cast. And yes, you can easily put a price on your time but I’ll not argue the point. That’s not the major issue. I am old, tired, and in less than good health now. Unless it’s something like a rare bullet I want [ie. Ideal 360171 or 358250 and the like] I’ll just buy my bullets, and cast only the rare ones with the small amount of good metal I have.

    • #46746
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      Butch Wax

      Diameter
      I see you sized to .452 for your .45 Colt. Your Colt may require .454. This would explain the leading problem.

      Alloy
      For handgun I use 50% range scrap and 50% scrap lead / stick on wheel weights. None of my alloys are certified. All I do is look for particular range of hardness. I use a tester from LBT. I only add tin when I have fill out problems, which is usually only with .30 cal rifle bullets.

    • #46748
      Butch Wax
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      Bore is .451″. ACME 200gr RNFP at .452″ leave no trace. Mine, cast from my scrap crap at .452″ lead the first couple inches. 8gr Unique and a 200gr bullet is far from “a hot load” either. Its the alloy…. Everything that I have bought, unless it comes from Rotometals, is garbage. I no longer trust anyone else selling alloy.

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