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    • #23355
      shaper
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      Hi Guys, I have had my own powder coating shop for over 8 years now and thought I would bring up some items you might wait to know of.
      First let me say if you are happy withy the process you are using and it is working for you, you are doing it the right way.
      There are some things about the powder you should know.
      If you have to put another coat on because of holes in the finished product, It will come out darker. The more powder you put on the product the darker it will be. Also if you over heat the product with powder on it, it will dull the shine.
      Every powder has a designated cure time and temperature. The most common would be 400 degrees for 10 minutes. That means the item you are powder coating must be 400 degrees with the powder on it for 10 minutes. That being said, you need a timer and a way to know the temperature. I use the temp tester from Harbor Freight.
      If you are concerned about the gas check fitting or not, each coat of powder when cured is about 2-3 mill thick. darker colors seem to be thicker than the lite colors.
      I have not seen the process that is being used. As I understand it you put both powder and the cast bullets in a container and shake it, then put it on a plate and into the heat. As I said, if you are happy doing this, go for it.
      Here is what I do. I cut a 8 x 16 piece of aluminum and put 2 inch legs on the corners. I then drew horizontal and vertical lines 1 inch apart. Every place the lines crossed I drilled a 1/4 inch hole. When I am ready to powder coat my 30 cal bullets I put them in the holes nose first. I then put it in my oven for curing.. There will not be any coating on the nose area but the nose will not contact the inside of the barrel anyway. I use my temp censer and monitor the temp so it will not over heat. The lead should not degrade until about 640 degrees.
      Again, I am not saying you should do things my way. If your process is working for you, you are doing it the right way.
      If I can help in any way, please ask.

    • #23406
      popper
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      Heat treating PC’d bullets works well by holding the same temp for 1 hour, then dropping in cold water, assuming alloy is treatable.

    • #23488
      shaper
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      yes you can do that. the normal cure for most powder is 400 degrees for 10 minutes. But you can say 350 deg. for 15 min, or 300 deg. for 20 min. or 250 deg. for 25 minutes. It would help you and save you sometime to get one of the temperature readers from Harbor Freight for about $15.

      Something else I forgot to mention in my last post. If I have a item that I have a problem getting the powder to stick, I will put the part in the oven until it gets to about 150 deg. then shoot my powder on the item it will stick and there will not be any voids on the finished product. This process might of help for those that put the cast bullets and powder in a container and shake.

      Again, I understand everyone does not own a powder coating gun. If the process I use can be of help to you I am happy to help. I’m not an expert at this, I am fortunate to have been doing this for 8 years. I have even taught two other people so they can start their own powder coating shop in the county near me.
      I am here to help where needed.

    • #23652
      Newt
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      Is 250 deg for 25 mins the lowest you can/should go? I wonder if doing a longer, lower temp, cure would help with the original hardness of the bullet to stay that way. As it stands now, my bullets loose their hardness after I cure them. I don’t have a hardness tester so I do not know how much, but its enough to tell from scratching it.

    • #23683
      shaper
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      I’ll run some tests and let you know. I believe what it is going to bowl down to is what is the lowest temperature that the powder will cure.

    • #23909
      IllinoisCoyoteHunter
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      Lol. That’s a good prank!

      I have been running Smoke’s powder at 400 degrees for 20 minutes. Maybe I am running them longer than they need??

    • #23935
      Goodsteel
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      IllinoisCoyoteHunter;n2003 wrote: Lol. That’s a good prank!

      I have been running Smoke’s powder at 400 degrees for 20 minutes. Maybe I am running them longer than they need??

      I only do 10 minutes. 15 is plenty. 20 is overkill in my opinion.

    • #24286
      Newt
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      I’ve recently been doing 350 @ 30 mins total time. That is, I set the bullets in, crank the timer to 30, and walk away. I did set there one time to watch the temp. It got to 300 at around 15 mins after the timer started.

      All said, they shot fine. Before I set the timer to 20 mins total time and 400 degree mark. All in a small toaster oven, no preheating. Done it this way for over a year. No bad effects. I can say that the gloss over very quickly into the cycle. So after glossing they get 15-20 mins of bake time. But that is not at full temp.

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