Viewing 4 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #25141
      Reg
      Participant
      • Silver
      • ★★
      • Posts: 40
      • Comments: 256
      • Overall: 296

      Ed Harris in the last issue of The Fouling Shot ( Journal of the Cast Bullet Assn.,highly recommended ) wrote an excellent article on pan lubing. Basically follow exactly what he says and results are guaranteed. Have used the same system for at least the last 15 years and have yet to have a failure.
      Anyway, after you have lubed your bullets how do you make them the correct size? There are many methods out there right back to using a sizing machine such as a Star, RCBS or Lyman but to me by going to any such machine is self defeating in the respect that all the reasons you went to pan lubing are thrown out the window. I think to eliminate sizing problems is one of the main reasons to pan lube.

      I used to use a Lyman sizing machine and no matter how careful I was it was very common to see that the cast bullet was sized off to one side or by looking carefully at the bullet and slowly spinning it you could see that the sizing was off set or not true. Setting any bullet up in a V block then using a dial indicator at various points quickly will show you what you have.
      Off set sizing no matter how you cut it has to equal a off balance bullet and that leads to bad accuracy no matter what. Period ..

      The Lee push through system is a great system. I tried several of the Lee sizers and was more than satisfied with the results. I actually went back and compared the fired results with the finished Lee sized bullets to the finished results with the Lyman ones that did show some runout and the difference showed on paper. That was enough for me. I sold the Lyman sizer and have not looked back.

      One thing you must consider is that this system of which we speak is not the fastest out there. if you process large amounts of cast bullets , it is not for you.
      Myself, I do a large amount of testing loads and performance with a great many rifles and few pistols. I could care less of speed but am far more interested in making a rifle shoot to it’s true potential and this ends up hopefully as small groups on paper at known ranges.

      After being satisfied with the Lee tools but being a tightwad and liking to do as much for myself as possible anyway I got to looking in the spare parts box, found a old Herter die body and went to work.
      Boring the die body out to fit Lyman dies is exacting in the respect there is very little left in the way of metal from the bore to the minor diameter of the 7/8″x14 thread but there is enough. You want to bore it so that the main sizing die body will just slip up into the larger body and bottom out at the depth that will stop the movement of the Lyman die and hold it. The actual holding in place is done with the O ring. There is little pressure involved but it seems to be enough. the final bore through I made to ..465 to allow sizing of up to 45 caliber bullets.

      My shell holder I made up to fit a Herter Super Model 3 press. I bought it new in 1962 and have used it since. I like it so much I actually have 3 of them.

      The shell holder attachment is universal in the respect I have different diameter push rods held in place with a set screw. The small nylon tube drops into the top of the die and guides the finished sized bullets as they rise up through the top of the die. I do have several to cover the different diameters I use but just a few cover the whole area. The 25 caliber is also the .22 and so forth.
      With this system the TIR of the finished bullet is almost impossible to measure. One big variable has been removed.

      You will note what appears to be a Lyman die body without the lube holes drilled in it. Exactly what it is but Lyman didn’t make it. Rather than buying dies, I just make them to any size I want. About any material will work as I don’t bother to heat treat them. To this point I have found no need to do so.
      Stress Proof or any Leadloy is fast and easy to work with but even a old Chevy truck axle will work.
      There has been a couple of times I blew the wanted dimension say by .0005 or so– no problem. Put the bad one in the reserve pile and make a new one but save the next one for the next size larger wanted. If you do much playing on the lathe you get quite a collection in no time.

    • #25148
      Wright Arms
      Participant
      • Silver
      • ★★
      • Posts: 8
      • Comments: 130
      • Overall: 138

      Marvelous post. Thank you SO much.

    • #25150
      bjornb
      Moderator
      • Silver
      • ★★
      • Posts: 13
      • Comments: 163
      • Overall: 176

      Reg, excellent post. I wish I had machinist skills but I don’t. I agree 100% with your conclusion that lube sizers do a lopsided job sizing cast bullets. Mine has been relegated to crimping on gas checks (with the Lyman GC attachment), and lubing big bullets for my 45-70 shooting. It’s permanently filled with Bullshop’s NASA lube.

      I dip lube (very close to pan lubing), and use 3 different push thru sizing systems: The LEE dies where they are available, the new NOE push thru setup (great system), and also a very similar die sytem to yours that was sold by Keith The Perfessor over on Castboolits before he went silent. His main die body is the twin brother of the one you have pictured above, with a thin wall and a shelf that contains the Lyman/RCBS dies and secure them with a pin system so they don’t fall out the bottom.

      Thanks again for pointing out the advantages of using push thru sizers.

    • #25172
      Reg
      Participant
      • Silver
      • ★★
      • Posts: 40
      • Comments: 256
      • Overall: 296

      bjornb;n3478 wrote: Reg, excellent post. I wish I had machinist skills but I don’t. I agree 100% with your conclusion that lube sizers do a lopsided job sizing cast bullets. Mine has been relegated to crimping on gas checks (with the Lyman GC attachment), and lubing big bullets for my 45-70 shooting. It’s permanently filled with Bullshop’s NASA lube.

      I dip lube (very close to pan lubing), and use 3 different push thru sizing systems: The LEE dies where they are available, the new NOE push thru setup (great system), and also a very similar die sytem to yours that was sold by Keith The Perfessor over on Castboolits before he went silent. His main die body is the twin brother of the one you have pictured above, with a thin wall and a shelf that contains the Lyman/RCBS dies and secure them with a pin system so they don’t fall out the bottom.

      Thanks again for pointing out the advantages of using push thru sizers.

      I tried dip lubing and you bet, it too works very well and sometimes if I am only doing just a few cast bullets will dip as I think that for just a few it is a bit faster.
      Am in the process of making up a copy cat version of the NOE system and bet it too will work very well. Actually in some ways the NOE process is a take off ( Highly modified for sure ) of what Buelding and Mull did years ago.
      I followed The Perfessor back when he was explaining his thoughts and was showing what he was coming up with his concept and if one couldn’t tell I do operate on the concept that imatation is truely the sincerest form of flatery !!! I miss Keith. Way too many have gone silent to suit me. One has to wonder why.

    • #25179
      Doc Highwall
      Participant
      • Silver
      • ★★
      • Posts: 8
      • Comments: 123
      • Overall: 131
Viewing 4 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

© 2017 Goodsteel Forum. Designed by Covalent Designs, LLC.