Viewing 3 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #47132
      Harter
      Participant
      • Gold
      • ★★★
      • Posts: 76
      • Comments: 807
      • Overall: 883

      <p>I fell in love with the BPS about 15 min before steel shot was mandatory for waterfowl before that I did my best to wear out a model 12 the same age as me ……<br> With somewhere between 11-12,000 rounds the slide assembly on the old girl gave up on the push rod end . I’d already effected a couple clever but poor repairs to the split wood . The repairs were good enough for a field gun and must have been strong enough because the new break was always next to the old repair . Definitely not up to Browning aesthetics standards .</p><p>Yesterday for an insanely low price I scored a complete fore end with slide assembly .<br> So now the question is how do I “beef up” the wood inside so I don’t break it again ? Radial grooves and accroglass or the miracle ……110 bedding stuff Tim uses ? Would it be best and right to fill the stock to the tube or leave some breathing room ?</p><p>Maybe I should just leave it to the master ……</p><p><br data-mce-bogus=”1″></p>
      The BPS is there in the middle with all of the metal sticking out of it .

    • #47148
      Glenn
      Participant
      • Silver
      • ★★
      • Posts: 43
      • Comments: 222
      • Overall: 265

      While building my 470NE Double, I read lots of posts on the big bore forum at accurate. What they did for stock reinforcement was to cut recessed grooves across potentially weak points, then insert brass or steel all thread, then glass it in place.  You can get colors to mix in to hide the screws if you want.

      Where the back of the action butted up to the stock started to crack from the heavy recoil. So I machined a steel block to fit the contour of the action, then inletted the stock to fit. Before I glassed it in place, I recessed a couple of #8 brass machine screws horizontally, and put an 8″ piece of 1/4-20 all thread lengthwise through the grip from the inside.  So there was nothing visible from the outside.

      Hope this helps.

    • #47150
      Harter
      Participant
      • Gold
      • ★★★
      • Posts: 76
      • Comments: 807
      • Overall: 883

      The trouble with this is that it’s a fore end on a pump shotgun if the new wood is fat it’s only 3/8″ thick . The shotgun has probably 12,000 rounds through it by me and I bought it used almost 30 yr ago …….that was depressing ……..
      There’s not really room for pins in the fore end .
      I’ll probably just put it on and shoot it until it lets go the old girl will probably be read for a Malcolm or factory overhaul by then anyway ……..or the kids will be fighting over it .

    • #47225
      Goodsteel
      Keymaster
      • Gold
      • ★★★
      • Posts: 208
      • Comments: 2452
      • Overall: 2660

      The solution to a splitting forstock is to use round chisels to relieve about 1/16″ to 1/8″ from the inside of the stock as far forward as makes sense to do so. you basically bore out the forend. Use a dremel to cut cylindrical grooves in the walls, and a gouge to push linear grooves to create a checkered pattern in the relief cut.

      Then you make a form that resembles the mag tube/forend metal, long enough to protrude from the nose of the forend, and spray it down hard with Acra-release.

      Mix up some fiberglass resin, and dope the recess, then dope the cloth and wrap it around the form and insert it into the forend to dry. Heat speeds the process and helps the resin wick into the wood, but do not use it if the wood is lousy with oil residue.

      Once the glass is dry, gently tap the form from the nose end of the stock to dislodge it from the wood. Clean up the excess with files and a rotary tool.

      If the wood is oily, extra steps must be taken to evacuate the wood of oil. This usually involves heating the stock with a heat gun, then letting it soak for some time in a container of acetone, letting it dry, then checking for oil with the heat gun again, and repeating if necessary. This will destroy the finish on the stock, but it usually needs to be refinished anyway, so its no step for a stepper.

      Once done correctly, this creates a forend that will take quite a beating.

Viewing 3 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

© 2017 Goodsteel Forum. Designed by Covalent Designs, LLC.