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    • #22308
      Victor N TN
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      I hope everyone here remembers to wear boots or shoes, and safety glasses. It doesn’t take too much hot stuff to leave scars that last a lifetime.

    • #22310
      Goodsteel
      Keymaster
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      Indeed! Crocks are not good casting shoes.
      While we’re on the subject, you might as well know that when molten lead hits denim, it fuses to it on a molecular level. Wear cloths you don’t mind using for the purpose!
      Good to see you Victor!

    • #22316
      rockrat
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      I stick old dishtowels on my legs when I am sitting down casting. Had the tinsel fairy visit and emptied a 10lb pot real quick. Only took 20 years for the scars to fade

    • #22319
      Sgt. Mike
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      Ouuuuchhhhh

    • #22328
      Sgt. Mike
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      OUUUUCCCHHHH
      I hurt from just reading that

    • #22534
      rockrat
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      I was sitting on the floor cross legged doing my casting (lot younger then). Pot sitting on a footstool. Had just put some reject boolits from last nights casting in the pot. heard the pot “rumble” and threw my arm in front of my face just in time. Lead on the ceiling, on my bare arm, on my shirt, my jeans and on grandma’s old pie cupboard about 4 ft. behind me. Probably about 3-4 lbs on my clothes. Maybe a pound or two left in the pot. Peeled the lead/skin off my arm. No safety glasses, but luckily I had good reflexes and got my arm up in time otherwise I would have had a face full of hot lead. I was lucky.
      Little more careful nowadays

    • #22539
      Goodsteel
      Keymaster
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      For the record, I believe that the most important piece of safety gear that you can have is safety glasses. I’ve been wearing them so long, I just never think about it, but they have protected my vision so many times it’s shocking.
      So when the eye doctor told me that it was time to get glasses a few years ago, I told him I wanted the best that can be had. I am blessed to have a doctor who understands the shooting sports, and he designed my glasses to correct best in the upper left quadrant of the lens so when I’m shooting, its perfect correction. He also got me scratch fog, and UV resistant lenses that are computer corrected all the way to the edge of the frames.
      He said I was the first person who ever requested side shields.

    • #22737
      VANN
      Participant
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      I agree about the glasses. You can lose a lot of body parts and still be able to shoot, you lose your eye’s and things get much harder.

    • #22756
      Wayne the Shrink
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      • Overall: 5

      rockrat;n326 wrote: I was sitting on the floor cross legged doing my casting (lot younger then). Pot sitting on a footstool. Had just put some reject boolits from last nights casting in the pot. heard the pot "rumble" and threw my arm in front of my face just in time. Lead on the ceiling, on my bare arm, on my shirt, my jeans and on grandma’s old pie cupboard about 4 ft. behind me. Probably about 3-4 lbs on my clothes. Maybe a pound or two left in the pot. Peeled the lead/skin off my arm. No safety glasses, but luckily I had good reflexes and got my arm up in time otherwise I would have had a face full of hot lead. I was lucky.
      Little more careful nowadays

      Why I always cast standing up. I load sitting down.

    • #22761
      JRR
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      I also cast standing. Ladle, not bottom pour. This way, I can easily jump out of the way and don’t need to contort. Use a bar stool for the rest of the processes when my feet hurt.

    • #23129
      bullet maker
      Participant
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      I cast standing up also. Safety glasses and gloves.

    • #23131
      Anonymous
      Inactive
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      • Overall: 129

      I cast and reload standing up also. Safety glasses always and welding gloves when casting.

    • #23149
      Alphawolf45
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 2
      • Comments: 17
      • Overall: 19

      Leather shoes would be good. While standing I have had a bit of lead splash onto my athletic shoe which is some sort of rayon or nylon and wont stop hot lead.

    • #23207
      rockrat
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 3
      • Comments: 23
      • Overall: 26

      I use a bar stool for both casting and loading. ounded my feet out years ago. Hurts to just stand. Wear glasses when I cast and load. Hooded sweatshirt when I cast in the late Fall/Winter/early Spring.

    • #23236
      Clintsfolly
      Participant
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      • Overall: 2

      I cast setting and load the same way. Wear glasses all the time

    • #23293
      Deep1
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      • Comments: 4
      • Overall: 4

      I cast sitting on a bar stool also. I wear long pants, leather shoes, leather apron, welding gloves, long sleeves and eye protection.

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