This topic contains 6 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  uber7mm 9 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #49161
     Rattlesnake Charlie 
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    Locking rings vary from manufacturer to manufacturer. I don’t seem to have very good luck of the ones from Lee staying where I want. I don’t like the ones that drive a screw into the threads. Too much machinist in me. I do like the Hornady split rings with the cap screw tightening the ring around the die body. Unfortunately, they are not of hex design, and that makes working in the confined spaces of a Dillon tool head frustrating. In the attached photo you can see where I modified an offset hex wrench to work in those close confines. I sure wish someone would make a lock ring of hex design with the split ring design.

  • #49162
     timspawn 
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    The old RCBS dies had a split ring with no flats if I remember right. I actually like the Lee set up but the Hornady split ring works great, I just don’t have many Hornady die sets. I guess a guy could order a bunch of their rings and retrofit his dies.

  • #49163
     kens 
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    My guess , would be to get a bunch of cheap hex lock rings, maybe Lee, and remove the o-ring.

    then use 2 lock rings on each die and double-nut them to hold a locked position.

    After all, on loading dies, you don’t apply real torque on the die to the press, I’m only saying to double-nut lock rings to hold a position of your die to your press.

  • #49164
     Rattlesnake Charlie 
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    I tried double nutting the lock rings, but then I had difficulty getting a wrench on the lower ring to tighten or loosen it.

    As for the Hornady rings, they do not allow a hex wrench. And, with the limited clearance on the tool head of Dillon presses, it sometimes gets challenging. I guess I should not complain too much as once the dies get set I should not be adjusting them. OK, then comes the bullet seating die. Seems it always needs adjusting whenever you change bullet designs.

  • #49166
     JRR 
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    Forster lock rings.  Work great.

  • #49167
     Glenn 
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    Those look like the ones that I have.  I bought a big package of them from Midway.

    I really don’t like the RCBS lock rings that have the brass set screw that always strips out when you try to back it out to reset it moving from one press to the next…

  • #49169
     uber7mm 
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    I found that the Hornady lock ring flats are slightly smaller than 1 1/8″.  To overcome rounding the edges, I use an adjustable “Crescent” wrench tightly on the flats.

    For a confined space, I’d find a Crescent wrench at a yard sale or second hand shop and modify it to my needs.   I had such a wrench that I hung in the garage specifically for shutting off the gas main, but it disappeared.  I suspect my teenager was involved.   (Get your own tools, son!)

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