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    • #24577
      DaveInGA
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      Howdy all,

      While normally I just buy a Lee deluxe die set with “everything” in it to start reloading for a caliber, then add a Forster seating die and/or other dies if I find the Lee doesn’t perform, I’ve recently run into a quandry. I’m buying dies for 2 new calibers, .22 K hornet and 6.5 X 55 Swede Mauser. Lee doesn’t offer their deluxe die sets that include the FL sizing die and the Neck sizing die in one die set. So if I wanted both a FL size and a neck sizing die (I do), I’d have to order a 3-die set with a factory crimp I won’t need and a neck sizing die set so I end up with an 2 seating dies (and I probably won’t use either of these). Adding up the cost, I find I am right at or even above the price for a Redding 3 die set that includes exactly the dies I want.

      Both of the rifles for the above calibers are bolt actions, both are for hunting purposes only. I’m a good shot, have that natural gift some have of total focus, so I can take advantage of accuracy available. My last High Power scores were in the 425-450 range out of 500 across the course shooting a tuned M1 whose barrel was at the end of it’s life. I much prefer very accurate rifles when I can get them.

      What I’ve got a quandry about is the Redding standard seating die that comes with the sets. How good is it, how does it perform, how is it put together? I am seriously considering adding a Forster Competition Micrometer seating die for the 6.5 X 55, as this is my newest deer rifle.

      Anyone that uses the standard Redding seating dies and can give me some feed back on them, I would very much appreciate it. I can afford the extra seating die at this point in my life. Forster doesn’t offer a .22 K Hornet at this time, so I would have to go to another brand for a competition seater die for that rifle.

    • #24587
      Goodsteel
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      Just my humble opinion, not so humbly given, I have over sixty dies sets here at MBT. I think I have every brand made in the last 5 decades except Herters (I gave all those to a friend who collects them), Dillon, and Hornady.
      After playing with all of the dies, I have boiled it down to Redding being my absolute favorite. They have a feel to them as well as a quality that I adore. RCBS, and Lyman tie for second place although, of the two I think I like Lyman just a touch more even though I have far more RCBS.
      Lee gets you there by midnight, and they work well, but I wouldn’t say I really enjoy working with them. We’re talking about the differance between Snap-On, Craftsman, and Stanley. Love the Snap-On, usually settle on the Craftsman, and buy Stanley for stuff that I don’t do very often (For instance, all the WSSM calibers are Lee). You get the point.
      Anything that I’m going to be loading a lot of, I want that Redding set.

    • #24628
      Harter
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      Tim if you have any Pacific dies they are the parent of Hornady, the tools anyway .I haven’t used any Hornady dies but I have several Pacific sets . If Redding can along at the same price as RCBS or within a couple of dollars I’d try a set.
      I have used Lee,Lyman,RCBS and Pacific side by side and this I can say 100 if you expect to have to form a longer case or do a major neck down for any cartridge buy anything but Lee. . The Pacific sets are definitely a better feeling die than Lyman an RCBS . I just have a hard time buying an Escalade we a power Leather suburban get it done . Sometimes you have to drive a base nothing Chevy ,while it does the job it ain’t really a road trip machine. Side by side for a single caliber I’d pay $5 more fore the RCBS dies but I have a hard with paying 15 more for Hornady or twice for Redding.

    • #24652
      gwpercle
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      My very first rifle dies , 30-06 standard Redding two die set , circa 1968, for a 1903-A3 Springfield , Full length sizer and plain old seating die .Couldn’t be happier with them, they sized just enough to chamber and didn’t over work the brass, brass lasted 20 + reloadings with cast. Seating die did/does its job. I still have both and use both . But I’m no competition shooter, I’m old, old school ! Set bullet seating depth with a factory loaded round or to the crimp groove/cannelure on the bullet. They hadn’t invented OAL back then, low tech to the max.
      But I give the Redding dies I have a five star rating.
      Gary

    • #24654
      Goodsteel
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      I have a set of chrome plated Pacific dies. are those what you are talking about?

    • #24662
      Harter
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      Durachrome I think is the name I think .

    • #24771
      DaveInGA
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      I went ahead and placed an order with Graf’s. Hopefully, I’ll be receiving the dies later this week. Rings are in route for the two rifles. Tim, it won’t be long now before I’ll have everything together to send to you. Will just need the “I’m ready, send it.”

    • #24846
      Sgt. Mike
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      Reddings are on my to buy list one day, Currently use RCBS and Pacfic Durachromes, one set of Hornady and or C-H, although about 98% are RCBS.
      Maybe one day I breakdown and buy a set.
      Good choice Dave on the Dies.

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