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    • #26198
      dverna
      Participant
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      I have spent many frustrating hours researching the purchase of a new micrometer. A “quality tool” looks like a $150-200 investment. Is there something out there that will be good for my needs that can be had for about half that price?

      I will be using it to measure bullets and chamber casts. I also have a small Jet lathe and will be doing simple machining- things like a check maker and bullet sizing dies.

      Thanks for any input.

    • #26203
      Bodean98
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      https://30eca00a039f-002391.vbulletin.net/forum/reloading-equipment-and-processes/1498-micrometers-the-beginner-s-guide

      Here is a good write up by Illinoiscoyotehunter on the subject. Was very helpful for me!

    • #26206
      bjornb
      Moderator
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      Don,
      I found a Starret digital model on ebay for under 50 bucks. Currently there are a number of Starret and Mitutoyo micrometers up for auction, several bidding well under $50. I had mine calibrated at a local service for a few dollars, and I’m very happy with my purchase.
      Bjorn

    • #26208
      Goodsteel
      Keymaster
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      I would encourage you to buy this one. If it doesn’t work for you I’ll buy it from you (seriously, I could use another one). If you buy it, and it doen’t zero correctly, send it to me and I will calibrate it for you, and you can use it for the rest of your life.
      http://www.ebay.com/itm/Fowler-72-22…648237&vxp=mtr

      If you really want to be uptown, look at this one. Not too shabby.
      http://www.ebay.com/itm/Fowler-74-87…956367&vxp=mtr

      Back when I was a poor broke machinist with barely two nickles to rub together, I used Fowler instruments. I’ll bet I filled an 18 wheeler with precision parts with these tools, and that was using them every day in a toolmakers environment. They were always great tools for the money. Unless quality has totally tanked in the last few years, I’d still bet money on these babies.
      I actually bought one for Lars45 and as far as I know hes totally pleased with it. You might PM him and ask.

    • #26212
      dverna
      Participant
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      • Posts: 5
      • Comments: 81
      • Overall: 86

      Tim,
      Thanks for the help. I bought the first one you recommended. Less than $50 with shipping.

      I was leaning to getting the Fowler but your recommendation sealed it.

      Don

    • #26352
      doc1876
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 10
      • Comments: 51
      • Overall: 61

      I had a Machinist test for a new job the other day, and had to read a mittao (??) Couldn’t figure it out for love or money. I have all Starret, and no problem at all reading them. Probably just me, I know that it is always me.

    • #26376
      IllinoisCoyoteHunter
      Participant
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      • Posts: 7
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      • Overall: 81

      Call me old school, but I prefer non-digital mics. Ebay is your friend. Seems like there are always good deals on machinist tools.

      As long as you have something to check to see if it is calibrated properly, even cheaper tools can work just fine.

    • #26383
      Goodsteel
      Keymaster
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      IllinoisCoyoteHunter;n4937 wrote: Call me old school, but I prefer non-digital mics. Ebay is your friend. Seems like there are always good deals on machinist tools.

      As long as you have something to check to see if it is calibrated properly, even cheaper tools can work just fine.

      I prefer them too, but I like that analog idiot proof dial. I never use the dial to take measurements, but only to double check that I’m not off by .025 which is a goofball move that bites even the most seasoned machinists when they are tired or working hard.
      I bought a Starrett with the idiot dial about 15 years ago and its been my #1 Mic ever since.
      That said, it’s with a heavy heart that I cannot recommend Starrett tools anymore. They are selling over priced junk that is often precisely WRONG anymore. Over the last five years, I’ve been finding really janky stuff wrong with every Starrett tool I’ve bought. Spent big on their top end digital micrometers (I needed to measure .000050 by God) the 1-2 mic was off by .020 in the middle when zeroed on a standard at 1″ or 2″. Gack!!!!
      I wont go into a list of all the janky stuff I bought from them, but they convinced me that their quality has gone down-hill. If I’ve got to have it right, I go Mitutoyo now.

      However, if all you’re trying to do is measure .0002 on a cast bullet, my above recommendations will work just fine.
      Definitely check calibration.

    • #26405
      Anonymous
      Inactive
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      Had some of the older Starretts years ago, they were good. Not anymore. Now use Mitutoyo only, tenth reading, carbide faces, no worries.

    • #26451
      IllinoisCoyoteHunter
      Participant
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      • Posts: 7
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      • Overall: 81

      I completely concur fellas. Purchased a new Starret 1-2″ mic and wow was I unimpressed. At about 1.300″ the thimble actually becomes loose and will actually rattle a bit if you shook it. Junk. My older starret mics are rock solid. And all of my Mitutoyo mics are dead nuts and solid. If I buy new, it is Mitutoyo.

    • #26490
      bullet maker
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 12
      • Comments: 76
      • Overall: 88

      A Mitutoyo is the mic I bought.

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