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    • #27237
      Goodsteel
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      Cooking roast, or deer, or Chicken in the crock pot, often yields a great tasting cut of meat that may fall apart when you cut it, but it’s dry and hard to swallow. This is something that I have found a cure for if you don’t mind the flavor of onions.
      I stumbled upon this trick on accident when we cooked a roast in the crock pot last year and it actually got a little burned on the bottom. It was kind of hard to muscle my way through that. The next time, to prevent burning I wondered what would happen if I laid down a bed of quartered onions for the roast to sit on, and then stack the potatoes and carrots around the meat. My theory was that the onions would keep the moisture releasing slowly through the meat and protect it from the direct heat.
      It worked perfectly. The rule was made that onions go in first ALWAYS.

      Well, fast forward to a few days ago, we are all out of store bought meat and all that’s left is game.
      I took out a deer roast and Angie asked me how I wanted it prepared. I told her I honestly didn’t care as long as it was easy for her and ate good. She suggested we do it up in the crock pot, which immediately drew a frown from me (remembering all the chalk dry venison I’ve had that issued forth from such a versatile crockery.)
      I asked Angie of maybe it would be better if I carved it into fajitas and we make a nice pepper steak or something?
      She agreed that we could do that, but maybe the onion trick would be worth a try? (Such a lovely little scientist she is!)
      I told her I thought that was a superb suggestion, and she handed me the bag of onions with a smile (I’m the onion chopper in this family).
      I quartered up three medium yellow onions, and the next day she took care of the rest, and by the time I got home from work, the meal was ready. As I walked through the door, the aroma of venison blushed my nostrils.
      I have to say I wasn’t expecting much. Crock pot always fills the house with promises, but only sometimes delivers. I dished up a plate of carrots and potatoes and pinched off a piece of meat with the serving spoon thinking all the while I was in for a full five minutes chewing before barely washing down each bite with two swigs from the mug.
      I sat down and blessed the food, and finally proceeded to take the first bite. Hmmmm, push that deer meat aside and try a potato. Not too shabby! perfect in fact. Then a carrot. Equally delicious.
      Now the meat; the moment of truth. I used the fork to tear a strip off, made sure my drink was handy, took a bite and…………..bliss. Simply superb. It was as tender and juicy and easy to chew and swallow as beef.
      Wow! Said I.
      Wow! said Angie.
      And we enjoyed the first decent venison roast I’ve ever eaten. No leftovers sitting in the fridge for a month this time! It was fantastic.

    • #27244
      VANN
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      Sounds like something I need to try, thanks for sharing.

    • #27252
      Wright Arms
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      Might I suggest Morton Tender Quick salt to make ‘Corned Beef’? The instructions are on the back of the bag for the brine. If you don’t like things salty, cut the Tender Quick Salt in half and let it soak for a good 5 -6 days before cooking. Add pickling spice while cooking with whatever corned beef recipe you prefer. You can also make Pastrami from this. I have a spice list around here somewhere if anyone is interested. I use the Pastrami to make Rubens. BUT . . . I would much rather eat venison than beef. Kinda weird that way I guess . . . .

    • #27256
      Goodsteel
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      Wright Arms;n6102 wrote: You can also make Pastrami from this. I have a spice list around here somewhere if anyone is interested.

      What are ya nuts? Post it up man!

    • #27257
      Wright Arms
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      OK. For a 5 lb. deer roast, use 1/2 cup of Morton Tender Quick Salt to 2 cups of water in a glass or plastic bowl. Leave anything metal in the cupboard. Marinade for 5 days in the ‘fridge, turning once every 24 hours.

      Now, you can either add pickling spice to an 8 cup coffee filter and cook according to your favorite corned beef recipe OR

      Mix 3-tbs black powder
      2-tbs Coriander
      1 tbs garlic powder
      1 tbs paprika
      2 tbs liquid smoke

      Rub the above concoction over all exposed areas of the roast and either bake in the oven or place in the smoker for 5 hrs @ 250 degrees.

      Allow to cool, slice paper thin and use as you would any other Pastrami.

      Coriander is a bit pricey, but absolutely necessary, IMHO.

      Enjoy!

    • #27259
      Artful
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      Marinade / Brine’n Help lots of cuts of meat – one other trick to try is take BACON and wrap it around your meat before you put it in the slow cooker.
      As the fat is rendered out it drips onto the meat it’s wrapped around and helps infuse it.

      Simple Marinade is 12 oz can of Ginger Ale, 12 oz H2O, 1/4 cup Kosher Salt, 1/8 cup Sugar, add spices appropriate to the Dish (Soy sauce if stir fry, Cumin and Gran Marsala if Indian, etc) and let set in the fridge in a ziplock bag with your meat after burping out the air overnite or up to 24 hours.
      DON’T reuse the Marinade/Brines!

    • #27269
      chutesnreloads
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      I will remember the onion tip.Don’t forget some garlic in there.Coriander….also known as cilantro around here is a good weed to have growing in the yard.The leaves have different “shades” of flavor depending on maturity and you can harvest the seeds to use as a spice too.It is easy to grow and you can pick just as much as you need as you need it……no buying a bunch at the store and wasting half of it

    • #27278
      Wright Arms
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      Coriander is Cilantro . . . . well I’ll be. I did not know that. Thanks!

    • #27279
      Goodsteel
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      Yeah. it’s like H110 and W296

    • #27285
      chutesnreloads
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      or maybe just english and spanish

    • #27286
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      I’ve used a bed of diced onion on the bottom of the pot anytime I do a roast whether in the oven or crock pot. Just tastes good and works. I add wine/stock/water to have about one to two inches in the container. Sprinkle on the spices and the steam/condensing will do the rest. This has worked fine for me since the early 1970’s when I started eating a lot of roadkill while going to college on the GI bill.

    • #27705
      az-jim
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      Mix 3-tbs black powder……?
      Black powder or black peper ?
      Im guessing the latter, and its probably safer to put on the stove or crockpot 🙂

    • #29623
      bullet maker
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      I didn’t know that either.

    • #29633
      LenH
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      One thing I have learned the hard way about corned beef or corned venison is not to boil it. The meat needs to poach at about 180° for a couple
      of hours until an internal temp of 160° is achived. . It is a trickey thing to do but the meat will dry out at a boil.

      But I like the smoky taste of pastrami.

      Another trick about the brine is to take a merinade injecter and pump the brine directly into the meat. It will cut down the soaking by a couple of days.
      That is if you are in a hurry.

    • #32233
      kens
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      A couple times now I have made my own corned beef. Have not used Morten tender quick, but rather used that odd salt for corned beef.
      It is very good.
      I also tried it same recipe for Venison roast, also very good. Corned venison is a good thing.

    • #32235
      popper
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      Lipton dry onion soup, potatoes ( My system can’t take the real onions or cooked carrots), green beans. Depends on the cut of meat regarding toughness ( not the way you cut it, some meat is just like Dove). Wife’s family trick for game – wrap in Al foil with red wine, remove from foil about halfway through a slow oven (steam) bake, finish in crock pot or finish slow bake in oven.. Works great for fish also.

    • #32242
      GhostHawk
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      Cook it wet and slow, almost always results in meat that falls apart, moist, tender melts in your mouth.

      So back in my younger years we had gotten to the point where we had figured enough out that we were getting geese regularly. Big northern Canadian Geese.

      So mom had a goose thawed and she looked at me, how did you want to cook this?

      Not in the oven, not roasted, not dry. Mom, do it like you do squirrels. Sear it, brown tomato gravy, set it in there with plenty of moisture and let it simmer.
      All day long she kept walking by the pot, lift the lid, taste, smell. “I don’t know about this bill! It ain’t traditional” Hang on mom, wait.

      About 2 we shut off the fire, let it cool for half an hour, then I gently slid the meat from the bones. Broke up the bigger clumps of meat, removed gristle etc.

      Slipped it back into the pot to simmer. At 4:30 we thickened it slightly and at 5 we served it over mashed potatoes.

      No one knew what it was, but the serving bowl was soon empty.

      “Don’t roast em anymore Mom, these ain’t tame geese loaded with fat.
      These are wild geese and need to be treated right.

      Wet and slow, and yes onions are good. 🙂

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