This topic contains 8 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Glenn 1 year, 2 months ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #68744
     Glenn 
    Participant
    • Silver
    • ★★
    • Posts: 43
    • Comments: 218
    • Overall: 261

    Hello everybody.
    The boys and I were talking about wanting to make some knives, so wife got me a propane fired forge for Father’s Day.

    The only thing that I had on hand when she gave it to me was a piece of who knows what round bar. So I heated it up, chopped off a piece, got out some hammers, and commenced to pounding. I used a piece of Cedar left over from a tree that we removed in the spring for the handles.

    It’s ugly and I made a few mistakes, but I learned alot along the way.
    I ordered up a few different steels to try next and got some 5160 spring steel, 52100 bearing steel, 1080 and 1084. I have since been told that I should stick to one metal until I learn it, then move on to another one.
    For the second knife, I used the 52100 and went with stock removal instead of forging.

    The handles are black micarta. I made a few less mistakes on this one.

    I shifted gears and tried to make a pairing knife for the wife as her birthday is coming up.
    The blade is 52100 and I found some buffalo horn for the handles.

    I’m getting closer, but still have a ways to go yet.

    What would be a good steel to start with for a hunting knife that will be used for gutting, skinning, cleaning, and be resilient enough to cut through the brisket of an Elk? 5160?

  • #68751
     Jniedbalski 
    Participant
    • Silver
    • ★★
    • Posts: 23
    • Comments: 196
    • Overall: 219
    1. Wish I knew. Making knives looks like another hobby I would like to try. My boy made three knives in shop class at school. One was made out of a rail road spike kind of cool wish he finished and polished it more. The easiest he said was one he made out of 3/4 rebar I thank. That one turned out very cool
  • #68752
     Jniedbalski 
    Participant
    • Silver
    • ★★
    • Posts: 23
    • Comments: 196
    • Overall: 219

    My very favorite kitchen knife I got from my grand mother. Has a plain hickory Handel on it and brass rivets. Just plain carbon steel it rusts. It’s marked 100 year anniversary 1834 -1934  and company name. You can’t hardly find a knife that’s not stanless steel. As a kid every body had these knives. Every couple of months in stlouis a guy would come down the street with his cart playing some kind of music or bells ringing can’t rember and sharpen your knives . Didint answer your question but think plain carbon steel is good for every day knife use

  • #68757
     Harter 
    Participant
    • Gold
    • ★★★
    • Posts: 73
    • Comments: 802
    • Overall: 875

    I’ll say that whatever Imerial specifically Shrade/Uncle Henry used pre 1985 and in particular the folders was amazing by today’s generally available . They were carbon steel but I’m not much help past that . There is a knife thtead and there is a GI contract kitchen knife , it is hard to get sharp if it gets too far gone but sharp and kept up it stays sharp well .

    I have a 30s vintage Soligen Germany 8″ butcher cleaver that will remove deer and pork ribs 3-4 at a blow and slice tomatoes . It holds edges very well even when used to break bones . I suspect maybe a nickle chrome moly steel .

  • #68761
     popper 
    Participant
    • Silver
    • ★★
    • Posts: 1
    • Comments: 293
    • Overall: 294

     

    From a friend who made knives for years.

    My preference for stainless is 440C or ATS-34.  My favorite carbon steel is 1095.

    What kind of steel is best for making hunting/kitchen/general purpose
    knives.  Guy wants to forge his own, just using tool steel so far.

  • #68762
     Glenn 
    Participant
    • Silver
    • ★★
    • Posts: 43
    • Comments: 218
    • Overall: 261

    I should have asked, and easy for me to heat treat with a bucket of oil and a toaster oven for tempering.

  • #68772
     Goodsteel 
    Keymaster
    • Gold
    • ★★★
    • Posts: 208
    • Comments: 2452
    • Overall: 2660

    Fantastic piece of equipment Glenn. The geometry of your blades may cut better if a slightly different grind angle is established though.

    You should look up the American Bladesmith Society. Arkansas is knifemaking capitol of the world, and the ABS is an absolutely phenomenal resource for those who hand forge their knives. I can honestly say, no institution has influenced my craftsmanship as positively as the ABS. I still use the principles I learned through them on a daily basis and those who know what they teach will see the touch of excellence reflected in my work. I owe them a lot.

    They occasionally have “hammer ins” where a Mastersmith or Journeyman Bladesmith will teach the fundamentals of blade smithing. If you have any opportunity to attend, I highly recommend it!

  • #68811
     lead-1 
    Participant
    • Bronze
    • Posts: 8
    • Comments: 82
    • Overall: 90

    Personally I don’t think your first knife is ugly as you say. In my opinion it is handmade by your hands and it wasn’t made to go to the fair so it is an accomplished piece of work so to speak. Keep up the good work.

  • #68830
     Glenn 
    Participant
    • Silver
    • ★★
    • Posts: 43
    • Comments: 218
    • Overall: 261

    This is my latest one that I made for Wayne.  The blade is 52100 Bearing Steel with black and orange G-10 scales.  This one is scary sharp.  I’d bet you could do surgery with it.  It will be interesting to see how it holds up this deer season.

    The pins are supposed to look like dog paws.

    I have ordered some 80crv2.  The reports on it sound very interesting.  One guy reported that it took 4 2 handed swings with a 4# sledge to break a test blade clamped in a vise.

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

© 2017 Goodsteel Forum. Designed by Covalent Designs, LLC.