This topic contains 7 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Jniedbalski 1 year, 3 months ago.

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  • #68667
     Butch Wax 
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    Over 35 years ago I loaded for my Armalite AR180 with RCBS small base dies with the expected success. Traded that weapon in a moment of weakness and regretted ever since. Later a stepson from a past marriage stole the dies along with lots of other stuff. ’nuff said there….

    However, last Oct I bought an Anderson AM15 optics ready 16″ carbine new in the box at a great price. Got some Hornady American Series .223Rem dies and I was back in business as usual. My old “favorites” did fine in the faster twist 1:8″. However, yeah another however….. I absolutely love loading with Lyman and Ideal 310 tong tools. Yeah, I got presses, but I am nuts about the 310. I’m old, what can I say?

    Then I put my thinking cap on. Lyman never made a .223Rem set of 310 dies. Hummmmm… Then the light went on. Of course, .222Rem dies! Sure. Found a great vintage set with handles to boot! I planed to use my old plumb blued steel .38Spl handles anyway with the small cases so a spare small set was handy.

     

    The test…. Loaded 10 rounds strictly from fired brass from my weapon. Trimming and primer pockets attended to. Stock standard loading techniques for 310’s used. Nothing fancy. Necksized via 310 and seated 55gr .224″ Hornady SPBT in the final phase. No crimp.They fed fine. Shot supurb. And reloaded just fine.

    That was several months ago. I haven’t run a single case through the press with cases fired from my own weapon. Donated or purchased once fired get the bench FL sizing obviously as I didn’t shoot them. But after that it’s 310 all the way. Of the 400 rounds loaded with the 310 to date, zero have failed to feed. None have misfired or failed to fire. All display great tight groups [and have killed 3 hogs as well 🙂 ] And in my hands, I can load faster with a 310 than a single stage press, but not as fast as my old Lyman Spar-T turret press set to use primer tube and #55 powder measure in place on the turret. Admittedly, that’s a fast setup. And no, I will never own or use a progressive. I’m strictly old school.

    In conclusion, my use of the 310 dates back to 1960 and before. I have a great affinity for the 310 and everything I load can and is often loaded with one. It’s what I’m truly comfortable with.

    So yes, one can necksize with an autoloader .223/5.56mm with no problems. I went as far as loading/shooting/reloading the same 20 cases 12 times with no issues other than 2 1982 G.I. cases with slight neck splits from case fatigue (donated cases). I’m confident in this method.

    My apology for a long post. I sometimes get too detailed.

  • #68673
     Rattlesnake Charlie 
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    You are a true Lyman 310 fan.

    I enjoy reloading on my single. I have Tourette Syndrome, and find the repetition soothing. But, with Cowboy Action Shooting, IDPA/USPSA, and steel matches, my Dillon 550 gets most of the use. It does require more intense attention.

    Since my .223/5.56 ammo may go into one of several different rifles, I full length resize with RCBS AR Series Small Base die set.

  • #68674
     Butch Wax 
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    Yes sir, when I loaded 5.56mm long ago I was loading for three different rifles, and like yourself, the RCBS small base was a must. But since I no longer load for anyone but myself I enjoy the relaxing style of the 310. Learned to load with one as a boy with my great uncle. Loaded 45 Colt with BP. The old fellow didn’t care for the new kinda powder.

    Today, as I’m the “old fellow” the hands-on manipulation of the 310 tool keeps a majority of the arthritis at bay. Working the 310 with both hands it keeps my hands quite limber with of course, some great ammunition as the product of my efforts. Suppose one could call it “Accuracy Therapy”. 🙂

  • #68675
     Rattlesnake Charlie 
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    “Accuracy Therapy”. I understand it!

  • #68678
     Goodsteel 
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    That is interesting. I would have thought 223 would be high enough pressure that eventually the brass would start failing to go fully into battery (I experienced this in my old 300 WinMag days) but your tests seem to tell a different tale.

    Bravo on your enginuity!

  • #68679
     Goodsteel 
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    That is interesting. I would have thought 223 would be high enough pressure that eventually the brass would start failing to go fully into battery (I experienced this in my old 300 WinMag days) but your tests seem to tell a different tale.

    Bravo on your enginuity!

  • #68680
     Butch Wax 
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    I believe my greatest advantage beyond 58 years of using these tools is that I keep the cases trimmed exact. Combined with loads that produce approximately 85% to 90% pressure levels compared to full capacity loads and factory. I am always about 1gr to 1.5gr below any top load. Further I use relatively fast powder thus maintaining a rapid expansion and contraction that slower powders do not do.

    When I load hunting ammunition for this autoloader, they’re trimmed and processed as above but will be submitted to FL resizing every three loading. Needless to say I maintain meticulous records. 🙂

  • #68729
     Jniedbalski 
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    I always wanted to try only neck sizing for my ar just to see if I can. Glad to know I can

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