Viewing 14 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #25813
      az-jim
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • β˜…
      • Posts: 9
      • Comments: 36
      • Overall: 45

      Its time to haul compost to the garden!
      But one of the wood handles on my wheelbarrow broke. Replacement handles are about 2/3 the price of a new wheelbarrow, I didnt feel like spending $24 for handles or $37 for a new unit. I would rather spend that money on gunpowder…..which I did πŸ™‚
      So with a quick thought I got these from the garage

      Its nothing special but it works and saved me some money for the time being

    • #25817
      Goodsteel
      Keymaster
      • Gold
      • β˜…β˜…β˜…
      • Posts: 208
      • Comments: 2452
      • Overall: 2660

      Whatever works!

    • #25819
      Anonymous
      Inactive
      • Bronze
      • β˜…
      • Posts: 1
      • Comments: 23
      • Overall: 24

      Thank you! I will copy that idea.

    • #25821
      Artful
      Participant
      • Gold
      • β˜…β˜…β˜…
      • Posts: 187
      • Comments: 428
      • Overall: 615

      Way back when I lived in Oregon – I got a used wheel with a replaced set of handles – it had square steel tubing.

    • #25824
      jedomejd
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • β˜…
      • Posts: 1
      • Comments: 18
      • Overall: 19

      Last month Lowe’s had all their wheelbarrow handles set in a clearance section and priced at $5 a set. Wood or steel made no difference, $5 was the price

    • #25830
      farmerjim
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • β˜…
      • Posts: 0
      • Comments: 25
      • Overall: 25

      Good Idea.
      Neither the wood or the steel handles last long when stored outside.

    • #25847
      Reg
      Participant
      • Silver
      • β˜…β˜…
      • Posts: 40
      • Comments: 256
      • Overall: 296

      I must be the prepper in me coming out or what. Whenever I see a problem like replacing wheel barrow handles I simply go out to my wood stash , pick out what i consider as a good replacement and go from there.
      Yes, I keep a lot of wood on hand. I love working with it.
      Where we live there is actually very little native wood, out in the middle of the high plains. Basically whenever you see a tree, someone planted it it, it did not occur naturally.
      Kids and grandkids live over in Kansas and in the eastern and especially the south eastern quadrants they have lots of varied woods. So since we go over often, when we do I keep my eyes open and grab on to about any different kinds of wood we come across. Why I drive a pickup I guess.
      Anyway, whenever we stumble across any of these different woods, I bring them home, seal the ends and store them up overhead in our old barn.
      In the case of wheel barrow handles, I would try to find a stick of ash , or hedge ( osage orange ) or best of all, hickory. I try to keep a few straight branches of about 3 inches in diameter and six feet long and as straight and true as possible.
      Then to the table saw with a 10 inch carbide blade we would by guess and by gosh try to rough saw down one side as roughly true as possible then reverse and bring in the other side, there again close to true, then back again to the first side and roughly reduce to the desired finished width. Same with the thickness.
      By the way— none of this meets OSHA regulations.
      On to the planer where all four sides are reduced until we have a rectangle roughly the size we want. Then holding one end in a vice we would use a draw knife or spokeshave until we had reduced the handle portion to a round shape.
      A few holes drilled to allow mounting and guess what, you have a finished set of wheel barrow handles.

      The wife started something a few years ago where all tools with wooden handles that are used outside are collected up in the fall, repaired as needed and the wooden handles are liberally coated with boiled linseed oil then put aside for the winter.
      Not only do the tools take on a smooth golden finish to them but they are protected and tend to last almost forever.
      A shovel has been called a ” idiot stick ” but with just the slightest care can become a trusted tool.

    • #25852
      az-jim
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • β˜…
      • Posts: 9
      • Comments: 36
      • Overall: 45

      Oh to have the ability to stop out in the country and throw a few chunks of various hardwoods in the back of the truck πŸ˜‰
      Not out here in AZ lol, closest I get is some white oak up in the high country which is about a 2 hour drive at best for us deprived city folks.

    • #25868
      Reg
      Participant
      • Silver
      • β˜…β˜…
      • Posts: 40
      • Comments: 256
      • Overall: 296

      Actually we do not have much wood to speak of around here. One of the most common things said about here by those driving through is where in the heck are the trees. What few we have are usually planted along a creek or they have a bit of water somehow and they tend to be cottonwoods with spruce thrown in .
      What I do is when we travel ( up to 8 hours one way ) to see the grandkids then I start looking to find woods. Number one son is good at finding someone who might need a tree cut down while we are there or perhaps someone already cut it down and we can help turn it into firewood and I see a couple nice crotch sections they usually are more than willing to just give them away. This is what is taken home, sealed and put away. It isn’t a perfect system. Even with the best care we sometimes lose some wood but then again that’s OK as I have a wood burner out in the shop for winter time.

    • #25891
      GhostHawk
      Participant
      • Silver
      • β˜…β˜…
      • Posts: 2
      • Comments: 258
      • Overall: 260

      I see more wood piled on city boulivards than I ever did along country roads.
      Take a saw along with and take what you want. Just don’t leave a mess.

      Forks for slingshots, straight shafts for shooting sticks, walking sticks. Whatever your interested in.

      Elm, ash, oak, boxelder, fruit trees, pines, cedars, cottonwood. Always someone in the neighborhood cleaning up.

    • #25913
      Reg
      Participant
      • Silver
      • β˜…β˜…
      • Posts: 40
      • Comments: 256
      • Overall: 296

      Don’t forget to save about everything from fruit trees. Apple, peach, apricot, you name it. Great for smoking.

    • #25927
      uber7mm
      Participant
      • Silver
      • β˜…β˜…
      • Posts: 17
      • Comments: 288
      • Overall: 305

      Experience says: “Don’t fill that plastic garbage can too full, or you’ll split the sides.”

      Just a thought…..

    • #27916
      gwpercle
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • β˜…
      • Posts: 2
      • Comments: 36
      • Overall: 38

      Those dollies are the handiest things to have , a bungie cord around the top will keep the trash can in place .
      You idea just might be better than a conventional wheel barrow for us guys with back problems.
      Great idea, thanks for posting !
      Gary

    • #28136
      jedomejd
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • β˜…
      • Posts: 1
      • Comments: 18
      • Overall: 19

      I visited Flagstaff last Feb, loved it. It’s one of the few places I would be willing to relocate in. I live in the foothills here in NC, and like here, AZ has beautiful high country.
      JD

    • #45837
      NavyVet1959
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • β˜…
      • Posts: 2
      • Comments: 26
      • Overall: 28

      I had to replace the handles on my wheelbarrow once. I just grabbed a pressure treated 2×4 and cut the handles from it. Used a plane on the ends that you grip to give a bit more rounded contour though.

Viewing 14 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Β© 2017Β Goodsteel Forum. Designed by Covalent Designs, LLC.