Viewing 13 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #26477
      Goodsteel
      Keymaster
      • Gold
      • ★★★
      • Posts: 208
      • Comments: 2452
      • Overall: 2660

      I’ve been building superbly accurate rifles for other people for years, but I can’t afford my own services (common problem in many trades). I finally got together the parts for my own precision rifle and I built it in one of my all time favorite calibers: 300 Winchester Magnum.

      This rifle is not only meant to bring enjoyment to me alone, but also to show my work to local folks and demonstrate the accuracy that I produce here.

      This rifle is a 70’s vintage Remington 700BDL that I burned the barrel out on, and sorrowfully consigned it to the back of the safe for several years.

      I decided to rebuild it from a fancy American sporter to a long range, shoot where you drop it, tack driver. I got a very good deal on a Douglass XX M24 match barrel in 4140 steel (beggars can’t be choosers). I cut the barrel to 23″, chambered it with the system that I developed and dressed on my classic MBT target crown.

      Next, I visited my friend Fred Choate in Bald Knob Arkansas, and picked out a nice adjustable precision stock. Choate stocks are often frowned upon, but I dare say the McMillan fans should take a closer look if they want to save themselves a couple hundred bucks and a few months wait. The stocks are injection molded from fiberglass reinforced resin and the stuff is tough as nails. You can’t break it. The stocks feature full length aluminum bedding blocks and they do not skimp on the metal. They advertise drop in accuracy, but everything that I build gets bedded with 10-110 Devcon.
      The assembled rifle was crown heavy, so I filled every available crevice of the butt with lead shot mixed with bedding compound.

      The original rifle was made in the 70’s back before Remington forgot what a good trigger is supposed to be, so I had no trouble bringing it down to a very controllable 2lb pull.

      I cut the knob off, and installed one of my custom MBT sledge hammer bolt knobs. These are made from solid billet 4140 or 416SS and make ejection and bolt manipulation a real treat (to me anyway). I find this to be a real advantage especially when you’re dealing with a belted magnum. As all of you know, it is imperative that your bolt make a full stroke on the rearward motion in order to fully clear the belt of the subsequent cartridge, otherwise, the bolt nose can catch the belt and brisk forward motion crushes the cartridge and sometimes causes a jam that is not quickly cleared. By putting extra weight on the bolt knob, I’ve made it much harder to short stroke the bolt, and greatly minimized the chances of this occurrence.

      I topped the rifle with a Vortex Viper scope and I have found that i simply adore it. It’s no US Optics you understand, but I’m just a gunsmith on a serious budget here, and I find it to be a $500 scope that shoots like it cost twice as much, which is the reputation they have earned for themselves. Couple that with their jaw dropping warranty, and you get me saying “well heck yeah I’ll give them a try!!!”.

      Now, I had 100 pieces of vintage virgin WW whitebox brass for this rifle. I selected the Hornady 178 Amax bullet because I have come to trust it after proving dozens of rifle builds with it over the years. Again, I’m after a cheap tool that works better than the price tag leads you to believe it should. Amax is perfect for this project.
      I used Federal LR Mag primers, and Hodgdon H4831SC powder (you’re dang right I did).

      First groups from the new rifle were very promising from shooting 1″ at 200 (or three in a little cloverleaf like you see here):

      To 25 solid hits on a 6″ steel plate at 1/3 of a mile with no sighters off the bipod as I laid on the hood of my truck (group is in the lower left quadrant about three inches in diameter)

      To say it’s a fun rifle to play with is an understatement. In fact, I decided to make the rifle look as good as she shoots, so I had it painted by a friend of mine who is very talented with such things and pays attention to detail like I do. I intended to shoot an 8 shot group when he was finished with his work just to see if it will hold its accuracy after leaving my hands, getting strung up, painted, and baked in an oven by someone other than me.
      I picked the rifle up at the range, and I was very pleased with the result:

      Now, the moment of truth. The target was at 100 yards. The rifle had been painted and baked and worked over by someone other than myself. The cartridges had been riding in the case with the rifle for 6 months. The wind was gusting very badly from the 10:00 and makeing the target frame sway back and forth in it’s pegs.
      I laid the 8 cartridges on the bench and shot them rapidly at the target as fast as I could pick the point and squeeze.
      I was very pleased with the results:
      This is the same accuracy this rifle has demonstrated time and time again (with the exception of that one off to the right there. That’s never happened before. I’ll re shoot it)
      The first cold barrel shot is the one immediately to the left of the “flier”, one hole up from the bottom. The vertical stringing was due to the swaying of the target backer and is a well known issue at my range and the RO can back me up on that. The rifle maintains a 200 yard zero which should put my POI at +1.5″ @100 yards and I believe that’s exactly what we see here.
      No apologies on my end. That group is 7 shots sub MOA for rapid shooting from a wooden bench with a bipod, in heavy wind.

    • #26478
      Dick
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 10
      • Comments: 77
      • Overall: 87

      Those solid steel bolt knobs you make are a TREAT!! It makes a huge difference when cycling the bolt. All that mass, to me, aids in the speed of working the bolt. Plus it’s grippy as all get out, lol.

    • #26483
      Chris C
      Participant
      • Silver
      • ★★
      • Posts: 12
      • Comments: 157
      • Overall: 169

      It’s not often the cobbler gets to make a pair of shoes for himself. Beautiful work, Tim and wonderful (enviable) results. I know you are proud as punch.

    • #26486
      Goodsteel
      Keymaster
      • Gold
      • ★★★
      • Posts: 208
      • Comments: 2452
      • Overall: 2660

      Chris C;n5071 wrote: It’s not often the cobbler gets to make a pair of shoes for himself. Beautiful work, Tim and wonderful (enviable) results. I know you are proud as punch.

      This Remington was my first really accurate factory rifle (my standards have changed a lot since then) as it was able to do 2 MOA at 200 yards. I shot a buck through the heart with it at 320 yards from the off hand position. Just bothered me to no end to have it sitting unused in the back of the safe. Now it’s back and able to do 3/4 MOA for ten shots at the same distance. I feel its back in the saddle and better than ever. Good news was, since I had over 1200 rounds through it, there was no need to lap the lugs. LOL!

      Not only that, but now when somebody is at the shop and I’m telling them about my rifles, I can pull this baby out and watch their eyes bug out. I can take them to the range and let them get a taste of the real thing. If I’m at the range shooting small groups, people come over and ask about it.

      I built this last year but I wanted to wait till I had it finished to post it.

    • #26487
      chutesnreloads
      Participant
      • Silver
      • ★★
      • Posts: 4
      • Comments: 161
      • Overall: 165

      Very nice work.Makes me want to dust off my Savage tackdriver.So accurate I guess it got boring…..or maybe I just got into casting

    • #26489
      Chris C
      Participant
      • Silver
      • ★★
      • Posts: 12
      • Comments: 157
      • Overall: 169

      Goodsteel;n5076 wrote:

      This Remington was my first really accurate factory rifle (my standards have changed a lot since then) as it was able to do 2 MOA at 200 yards. I shot a buck through the heart with it at 320 yards from the off hand position. Just bothered me to no end to have it sitting unused in the back of the safe. Now it’s back and able to do 3/4 MOA for ten shots at the same distance. I feel its back in the saddle and better than ever. Good news was, since I had over 1200 rounds through it, there was no need to lap the lugs. LOL!

      Not only that, but now when somebody is at the shop and I’m telling them about my rifles, I can pull this baby out and watch their eyes bug out. I can take them to the range and let them get a taste of the real thing. If I’m at the range shooting small groups, people come over and ask about it.

      I built this last year but I wanted to wait till I had it finished to post it.

      Well, it’s a treasure you will enjoy.

    • #26492
      az-jim
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 9
      • Comments: 36
      • Overall: 45

      Good looking, and shooting rifle Tim. I’d be happy too.

    • #26495
      goody
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 18
      • Comments: 74
      • Overall: 92

      very well done indeed! If I was 30 years younger I would want one like that for myself also.

    • #26732
      timspawn
      Participant
      • Silver
      • ★★
      • Posts: 29
      • Comments: 137
      • Overall: 166

      Very nice Tim.

    • #26749
      lar45
      Participant
      • Silver
      • ★★
      • Posts: 21
      • Comments: 224
      • Overall: 245

      /drool 🙂
      I wonder how one of those bolt handles would look on a M96 Swede??
      Is that something that you’ve premade a few of, or is it a one at a time thing?

    • #26755
      Goodsteel
      Keymaster
      • Gold
      • ★★★
      • Posts: 208
      • Comments: 2452
      • Overall: 2660

      lar45;n5406 wrote: /drool 🙂
      I wonder how one of those bolt handles would look on a M96 Swede??
      Is that something that you’ve premade a few of, or is it a one at a time thing?

      Like everything here, each part is a snowflake. No two MBT rifles are the same, but they accomplish the same task. There may come a day when I have to take a much more “Wilson Combat” approach to my gunsmithing, but for now, each rifle is built one at a time and each accessory (like the bolt knob) is built to suit the needs of the customer.

      Personally, I would think that I custom butterknife handle would set off a 96. Here’s an Arisaka I built a few years ago, that sports one of my custom handles.

    • #26891
      bullet maker
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 12
      • Comments: 76
      • Overall: 88

      Looking good to me. I have been contemplating a custom rifle for awhile. Trying to decide on a caliber. I was thinking a 22-6mm or something along those lines.

    • #26893
      Str8shot426
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 1
      • Comments: 12
      • Overall: 13

      Very nice.
      I will back you all the way on the vortex scopes. I believe they are the absolute best scope for your money. Inexpensive not cheap.

    • #26898
      lar45
      Participant
      • Silver
      • ★★
      • Posts: 21
      • Comments: 224
      • Overall: 245

      Hey Tim, I should still have a Clymer 30-378 wby reamer if you ever feel the need to go BIGGER 🙂

Viewing 13 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

© 2017 Goodsteel Forum. Designed by Covalent Designs, LLC.