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    • #34777
      Goodsteel
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      There are so many that I have had the opportunity to shoot, spend time with, and use the field. Some I own, and some I have not yet been fortunate enough to own.
      Oddly enough, precision is not always the number one concern, but rather how well the firearms do in my hands, and perform the task I have used them for, although exceptional precision within each genre is important).
      I was just reminiscing that thinking there are some firearms out there that were a pure stroke of genius, and almost couldn’t be improved upon even if I wanted to. This is a short list of those firearms:

      Top across all genres:
      The M14/M1A main battle rifle.
      I would need a bouquet of daisies to count all the ways I love that rifle. Not too light, not too heavy, unbeatable power, usable precision with the battle sights, and a lifetime warranty from Springfield armory to boot. The M1A is my favorite firearm period, and If I could have just one, I don’t have to think long at all.
      It’s not a tack driver at all. It’s not pretty (of course beauty is in the eye of the beholder) and it’s not chambered in some 2500 yard cartridge. In fact, some might say it’s not really good for hunting past 600 yards. Parts are expensive and it does not lend itself to modification. The trigger is a good 5.5lb typical.
      It’s not the greatest, the grandest, the prettiest, or the most precise, but its RELIABLE, and it’s precise enough to take care of life’s issues no matter where you find yourself. It’s MEDIUM to a fault, which means it bridges the gaps between genres and is the most practically useful firearm I have ever experienced.

      The 1911 pistol.
      Ever heard of it? Yeah, I thought so. I won’t bore you by telling you what you already know. It’s the best, and I’m darn good and putting one together right. I need another bouquet of daisies for this one. I prefer oversized Caspian frames and slides, and Wilson Combat parts made right here in my state.

      The Benelli Super Black Eagle.
      Yeah, there’s a darn good reason I don’t own one of these, but I have to say, the quality there is pure sweetness. It’s the best shotgun for the money that I have used, and I want to own one someday.

      The Smith and Wesson model 19.
      I actually owned this firearm and let it go because I shot it so dang much, I got tired of it. I beat a few gents with rifles using that revolver. Pinned and recessed, it was a magnificent shooter, and believe me, I got all there was to get out of it. I don’t personally care to own another, but after doing a trigger/action job on it, and rebluing it, I have yet to experience a revolver of any make or model that could equal it.

      The Smith and Wesson Model 41 22 pistol.
      This is the finest smallbore target pistol I have shot. It’s expensive, but it pretty much stomps everything else out there and makes the runners up look like cheap, lightweight junk. A truly superb firearm.

      The Winchester Model 52 target 22lr.
      This is just really hard to beat. I’ve had occasion to shoot several of them, and they are very exciting rifles to shoot, and I love the weight and feel of them. Not too heavy, not too light, and well sculpted. Honestly, it’s a Winchester.

      The Winchester Model 70.
      Speaking of Winchester, I’m one of those sick contrarians who thinks Winchester hung the moon with their Model 70 rifle. I actually prefer the push feed over the Pre-64.
      When I grab a Winchester, even just to move it from the rack to the safe, I can’t just move it without looking at it. In my mind this phrase scrolls: “Look at that. It’s a real Winchester. The American rifle”. It’s the only one I get misty over except certain other rifles that have sentimental value. A Winchester carries a mystique I just can’t shake.

      The Marlin 1895 Model GBL.
      This rifle is made right. Exceptionally precise shooting for what it is, superb balance, and amazing power. I actually do not care for the big loop lever, but I will own one of these someday regardless. I’ve had my hands on almost every Marlin lever action you can think of, and the GBL is unique unto itself. It needs slicking up from the factory, but it brings more to the table than any other 45-70 on the market.

      The Remington 552 Speedmaster 22lr.
      I actually do own this rifle. It is the finest semi-auto 22 I have used. It shoots about 3/4″ groups for the whole magazine of 15 at 30 yards, and as long as it is kept clean, it functions with remarkable reliability.

      The Remington 760 Gamemaster.
      This rifle is a puzzlement. A conundrum. It’s actually very precise. SubMOA precision is commonplace. This makes no sense, but it is what it is. Sometimes you just have to praise the Lord and pass the ammunition. The 76/760/7600 brings precision to a light weight, handy hunting rifle. It’s the exception within it’s ilk.

    • #34781
      Scharfschuetze
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      Your tastes are very close to mine Goodsteel. In fact they are almost identical. In a slide action rifle, I do prefer the Remington 141 predecessor to the 760 though and I kind of like the M1 over the M14 for an self-loading rilfe.

      For shotguns, I like the Winchester Model 23 side by side and the Citori O&U for upland, skeet and trap. For waterfowl, I like the Remington 870 pump shotgun.

    • #34784
      Anonymous
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      What about

      The M1 Garand shooting 8 rounds then it tells you it empty with a distinctive ping

      the Battle Rifle 🙂

      and the

      1892 leaver action rifle — pistol caliber in a rifle

    • #34786
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      M1 Garand
      I’ve only shot a few hundred rounds though mine since I got it via DCM in the summer o 2011. Part of the attraction for me is that my dad carried one in Europe in WWII. I’m amazed how much I can hit with those sights. And, when you do hit something, well … maybe you should try it if you don’t know.

      M1 Carbine
      I was luck to get one via DCM with the last round imported. I’m amazed how light it is.

      Fox Sterlingworth
      I know it is not one of the high grade guns, but it handles beautifully. Mine saw some hard use and even neglect before I rescued it. Those with fancy, pretty, and high dollar guns still look it over at the trap range. I’m sure they think I’m a little strange. And, I’m kinda proud to be so.

      Ruger Stainless Super Blackhawk
      I had Magna-Port cut the barrel of mine to the length of the ejector rod housing, forcing cone cut to 11 degrees, target crown cut, and ported. I polished up the workings and installed Wolff Gunsprings. What a beautiful carry gun. Adequate for both two and four legged varmints.

      Marlin 1895 Cowboy in .45-70
      With the exception of the %&(*&$ plastic buttplate, it is a beautiful rifle. A might rough on you even with Trapdoor loads.

      Cimarron Arms 1873 Winchester in .357
      I originally wanted one in .45 Colt or .44 WCF, but this used one caught my eye. Already slicked up for CBA shooting, I was had. I can feel the old west when carrying this one around the crick north of Dodge City.

      Shiloh Sharps 1874 Sporter #1 in .45-70
      What more can be said?

      Winchester Model 70 in .308 with 6x Leupold
      A push-feed one.
      I acquired this one when a friend needed money. The barrel had been shortened, the trigger worked over, and glass bedded. It shoots better than I do. The 300 yard gong at the range is not much of a challenge. This one made me a believer in low power fixed power scopes.

      ML Pistol
      Started from a CVA kit when I got out of the navy in 1978, and enrolled in a class at the local community college titled Functional Art of the Frontier. With my machine shop skills from the navy I became the assistant teacher the next semester. I wanted a .50, but CVA had only .45 in stock. Things took off from there as I made a rifling machine that included several parts from a John-Deere binder to make my own .50 cal barrel of 10″. The barrel material came from a shaker shaft from one of my dad’s Massey-Harris combines. The “pewter” nose cap from an Avery tractor main bearing. Front sight blade from a Portuguese 5 escudo piece, base from pennies and copper wire. Numerous rabbits, one mule deer, and quite a few Buckskin competitions are owed to that pistol. This will probably be the one I am most fond of.

    • #34789
      Harter
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      I’m a fickle one .
      I have a 47′ M10 Smith , it is a dead heat for the 74′ Sec6 . I thought I had the bees knees . Then I got my paws on a couple of K frame triple locks disguised as 1917s . Oh the difference !!!! So if the wonder was carried from April 1918 then the M19 might be ok 🙂 .

      I like the M52 22 also .

      I prefer the HighPower to the 1911 .

      I’d love to have a Superpose , I’ve fondled a few and the Citori is nice but there’s just something more about those I’ve handled .
      I don’t care for the 1100 I prefer the A5 to the 1100 …. Simplicity I suppose .

      As much as I love the M12 the BPS is just more of all the good stuff . The M37 is clunky in comparison .

      Having fondled many of the greatest rifles , a pre-WWI GEW98 ,pre- 64 M70 , 700 BDL and some lesser bases , 95s , Savages , Carcano even a couple of the early Montana Rifleman rifles . I’m just a sucker for the 98′ .

      Lever guns ? The verdict is still out on the 1895G , the 92s at hand are cloned but are pretty nice and not terribly picky , the 1894 Marlin is smoother . For whatever reason there is just no appeal in the 94 Winchester . The Henry’s at least the pistol cartridge rifle is nice and every bit as good as the 92′ might be better . I’m pretty sure I’d sacrifice them all for a pre-war nitro proofed hand fitted 86′ . Yeah it has that cam over bump bump thing at the breech lock up but it carries well and I doubt any cavalryman ever said my rifle jammed I wish I’d had a Trapdoor instead .

      Pump rifles just don’t do it for me ……. I do have a 760 and a M14 Rem . Forged steel what else is there to say ?

      Auto rifles ? Ever shot a Galil ? Wow . They have all the eye appeal of corrugated leech field perferated pipe and that grooved chamber is hard on brass but the repeatable results would make it my choice in that class .
      For a lighter auto I don’t think there is anything that you can’t do with the AR/M4 except shoot paper patch . The cartridge selection is dizzying . It’s the western hemisphere’s troop rifle choice , there are 25 triggers , barrels from 7-24″ in 17-50 cal , 5 bolt heads , 3 bolt carrier weights and who knows how many external parts choices . You can have 1 trigger and butt stock and hook it to a 16# 1 hole wonder gopher slayer and in 15 seconds it’s a blow back 9mm and another 15 seconds it’s an auto feeding 45 or 50 cal suitable for subsonic suppressed critter whacking .

      ​​​​​​

    • #34794
      Goodsteel
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      I’ll explain my love of the M14 over the Garand:
      It simply boils down to ruggedness of the Op rod, and parts availability. The M1 was a superior rifle in many respects, but it’s hard to find quality modern production parts for it.
      I have shot them, rebarreled them, and enjoyed using them. I got the chance to shoot an exceptionally precise Garand once. I put 8 shots into 1.2″ at 100 yards.
      I like the rifle a lot for what it is, but the M1A is supported with modern parts.

      As to the AR-15?
      I shot one once, because everybody said it was very enjoyable. I did, and I have to say I see what all the hype is about. It blew into a bunch of pieces when I hit it with the 405 grain lead bullet from my 1886………It was quite impressive. :confused::cool::rolleyes:
      Yeah, the AR is here to stay, and it’s what every college kid wants to buy. I see a whole line of them at the range when I go. Young kids who just figured out which end the bullet comes out of, with the barrel resting on the sandbags and the 3′ groups at 25 yards. Sorry, the whole attitude and clientele that goes with that firearm is a huge turnoff. I could probably get rich quick if I started snapping AR’s together, but that just makes me hate em even more.
      That said, I am thinking a little M4 would make a dandy truck gun, and since they are sooooooo dang cheap right now with the market glut, I may buy one. But GAWD………

    • #34795
      Goodsteel
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      They are on my list, but not at the top.

    • #34796
      Goodsteel
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      Fox Sterlingworth: Congratulations on a fine FINE shotgun. Very nice indeed!!!

    • #34797
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      😁😂😎

      They are the ultimate tinker toys for grown-ups .
      I have access to a couple but they aren’t the heavy barrel 98 or the compact easy to carry 92′ , but they do have the switch barrel no shift Contender etc appeal in a repeater . They can be had as pumps and straight pulls . With mags from 3-100 .

      I don’t care for the aesthetics no matter what color they’re painted …..

      Under the seat is a good place for them .

    • #34799
      popper
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      I don’t like bolt guns or revolvers. I did shoot the Garand and carried the M1 carbine sometimes (pretty worthless rnd). M14 looks like the first ‘modern’ battle rifle. No fan of 1911s. My 30/30 does what it’s supposed to do. Never shot an AR15 in 223, no use for it. I really like the 300AC though. mild to wild, light or heavy, range or deer/pig loads. Only way you could make money in the AR business, as a G.S. is very good custom barrels. They are like rice burners, customize for what you want, very little smithing required but reasonable performance for most users. Got 12 & 20 A400s that work great but the 12 is getting too heavy for field work, just like the AR10 rifle. Got a couple Maverick pumps that don’t jam like the 870. 1170 is a good 12ga. semi for the money, let the SIL use it. G.K. has the maximus, too pretty for the field for me. My ‘favorites’ are just what works for me. As a kid, bro. got a lot of gun catalogs we would drool over. Funny, he’s only had a 22 revolver.

    • #34805
      kens
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      I agree mostly with Tim’s ideas the AR-series. I have little interest in the plastic and/or black guns. I dont feel any better about the Glock, its plastic.
      I am on the inside a blue steel & Walnut kind of guy.

      There is no better a ergonomic grip than a Hi-Power. period. and then put on some pachmeyer or hogue grips,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,Mmmmmm yeah

    • #34818
      lar45
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      My absolute most favorite gun of all time has got to be my Ruger Mk II Stainless 6 7/8″ Target 22lr pistol. I couldn’t even guess how many 10’s of thousands of rounds has been run through that gun. It has taken care of varmits of various size and shape, rabbit, ground squirel, grouse, a gazillion soda cans…

      My favorite large caliber handgun is a Ruger 4 5/8″ Stainless Blackhawk in 45 Colt. Mine has a blued bisley cylinder (set to 1.5 thou barrel cylinder gap)(and no it does not bind up at all), taller front sight painted white and then orange, and Houge Mono-grips.

    • #34834
      Menner
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      I agree with a lot of whats been listed here but
      First I have shot a few really expensive shotguns Krieghoff, Citori, Red Label, Benelli, Beretta, and others have not found any that make me want to set down the 3″ 1100 that I have been shooting for 30 plus years, it just shoots where I am looking and reliability has not been a problem for me. the only time I grab another shotgun is Quail or Rabbit hunting and I have a Franchi AL48 20ga that I can carry all day that beats the 1100 for weight

      I have shot a few AR’s fun, have no desire to own one. I call them Ammo eaters. don’t criticize anyone for owning one, to each their own
      Don’t own a semi rifle larger than 22LR one is a nylon 66 that thing just shoots have shot M1, M14 and had to qualify with the mini 14 each year for work

      Handgun I like the Hi Power but no fan of the 9mm I found a Hi Power Clone made by FEG in 40 S&W had a awful trigger I removed the mag safety and the trigger cleaned right up. I sent the barrel to Doug Guy had him throat and crown the barrel it shoots really nice now. The most natural pointing handgun I have shot. But I do love a 1911 also.
      I also have a soft spot for S&W Revolvers

      Always wanted a Lever gun never owned one until a couple of years ago bought a JM marlin 336 in 35Rem and I love it don’t see it leaving anytime soon

      rifle shooting is relatively new to me have a 700 sps in 204 Ruger that will kill varmints at 400 yrds if you hold your mouth right, other than that I have a couple Savage actions that I have built for cast shooting one in 308 and the other is in 358 win so they are my favorite
      Tony

    • #35454
      WCM
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      I have been fortunate enough to own a lot of different rifles and handguns in my life.

      Many I wish I still had, but I went through a stage when I would buy, shoot, test and trade.

      I got to experience a lot of different guns that I never could have owned otherwise.

      Favorites.. I like 86 Winchesters,and Model 70 pre 64’s

      Handguns, I like the Colt single action, and Smith revolvers.

      Nowdays I just spend as much time as we have at the range with my son watching him grow and develop as a shooter.

      He amazes me with his skill and talent .He is definitely on the way up.

      I am getting older now so I don’t have the appreciation for heavy recoil that I once did.

      I like shooting the .308 win and the .30/06

       

      • #35456
        Goodsteel
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        I have been fortunate enough to own a lot of different rifles and handguns in my life.

        Many I wish I still had, but I went through a stage when I would buy, shoot, test and trade.

        I got to experience a lot of different guns that I never could have owned otherwise.

        Favorites.. I like 86 Winchesters,and Model 70 pre 64’s

        Handguns, I like the Colt single action, and Smith revolvers.

        Nowdays I just spend as much time as we have at the range with my son watching him grow and develop as a shooter.

        He amazes me with his skill and talent .He is definitely on the way up.

        I am getting older now so I don’t have the appreciation for heavy recoil that I once did.

        I like shooting the .308 win and the .30/06

        I have to admit the pre 64 308 I got to shake hands with was of exceptional sweetness.

    • #35459
      WCM
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      Currently I have my fathers pre 64 model 70 featherweight .243 win and a pre 64 featherweight .308 win that was as new when I bought it.

      At one time I owned an pre 64 70 in ..300 H&H perhaps I should have kept it but I sold an M1A national match Springfield to buy it,and I sold it to buy another M1A National match .

      Guess I had more of a longing to own a M1A.

    • #35461
      Goodsteel
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      I made up my mind on the M1A. It stays. I’m afraid if I sell it, I’ll never be able to afford to get another one.

      I run pretty close to the line over here, so when I’m able to get a rifle, it’s precious. I’ve only ever sold a few, and I’ve regretted it every time.

    • #35464
      uber7mm
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      Same here.   Keep what you got.  Dial it in and get it to shoot.   I’m happy with what I have; what God has blessed me with.

    • #35472
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      I don’t buy and trade any more like I did thirty years ago, but I have owned a lot of different calibers and firearms.I enjoyed it back then. Wish I could have kept some of them.

      Now my daughter is sick and I don’t have the money.

       

       

    • #45136
      Jniedbalski
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      My favorite gun. My first pistol was a brass frame 36 1851 navy bought at silver dollar city in Branson mo. I don’t know if They still sell them but I bought it around 1981. I was around thirteen or  fourteen at the time. I remember taking my grass cutting money with me on vacation. I have shot probably thousands and thousands of balls through it. I got really good with it. My next favorite would be my sks. I bought it in the late 80s. It was the Chinese army made not the cheep imports. It shoots very good up to 200 yards not like the cheep imported ones did. My new fun gun would be my high point carbine 40 S & W. it is a lot of fun 25 to 50 yards. At 25 yards I can keep ten shots all touching with good reloads . Every body at the range wants to shoot it

    • #45141
      Goodsteel
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      That’s a great post jniedbalski. I can relate to a lot of that having started with an 1851 in 44 and having also had a pretty accurate Chinese SKS.

      You’re report of the highpoint is surprising never spent much time with one, but what I’ve seen so far was horribly unimpressive. Nice to hear a good report!!!!!

    • #45162
      Jniedbalski
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      The guy behind the gun counter at that time told me Jesse James pefered the 36 to the 44 it was more accurate. That’s all I needed to hear. I still remember, how was I was going to tell my dad I just bought a pistols . I rember I sat down on the bench my dad  was sitting on, the first thang he asked me was what did u buy? I showed him the pistol, he asked if it was black power I said yes. He then said cool and gave it back to me. I know I  had the biggest grin on my face  I got very good with that Italian revolver. The sks is my favorite deer hunting rifle. Its not that its a good deer round, I just like it because it’s short, light and quick to aim. The high point carbine is just a range toy. It’s short, good accuracy at 25 yards,very cheep to load with my range lead. My 22 rifles have been sitting the last few years. Could not find ammo or to expensive to shoot. The recoil is non existent not very loud like a short barreled pistol and just fun. All my kids like shooting it and taking it to the range. Since I can find 22s now the last few months the 22s are going with me again. The high point also gives me a reason to load pistol rounds which I like to do. But the cheep price again of 22s the carbine might be staying home more often.

    • #45167
      Goodsteel
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      My nephew got one of those highpoints in 9mm and was all excited about going hunting with it. I told him to stick to his Mosin Negant, but he was admit that he was going to take a deer with it. He bloodied one up and caught a ration of **** for it, but he kept at it. Next deer that came up got spooked and started to run away and he cut loose on it. Down it went, but when we got it back to camp there was only one bullet hole in it…….right in the cod sack.

      We ribbed him hard about that. Looked the deer over and told him “you know, that wasn’t really a mortal hit, but if you’d shot me there, I wouldn’t think life was worth living either!” LOL!!!

      Fortunately, he put that rifle aside and went back to the Negant.

    • #45172
      Jniedbalski
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      The Nagant is a great deer rifle. All my kids use one for there deer gun. My 16 year old got his first two deer with one. Last year he used his savage axis In 308  and got a real nice 10 point. It turned out to be also a good cast boolet  shooter. Thanks to Larry Gibson load using 3.2 gr of bullseye and a 100 gr.lead pistol bullet .I still have my 36 1851 navy. Got it re blued by a local gun smith 20 years ago. The cylinder pin is tight,not shot loose yet. The problem I have is the cylinder gap is to wide causing the cylinder to move forward and the caps to not fire a lot of the time. I need to pull the two frame pins and take some brass off the frame or have the barrel put in the lathe and take some off the pad on the barrel. Goodsteel can you do this kind of work or know somebody that can. I would like to shoot it again. Thanks

    • #45175
      Goodsteel
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      I can tighten it up for you. Let me know when you’re ready.

    • #45176
      Goodsteel
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      I can tighten it up for you. Let me know when you’re ready.

      Usually, when your gap starts growing on those revolvers, its on account of the cylinder pin migrating forward. I remember I had to tighten mine up when I was about 18 years old too. It just requires a new or modified wedge, and some work on the frame. No problem.

    • #45714
      GhostHawk
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      Yeah I really would not consider the 9mm Hipoint a Deer Rifle by any means.

      Even the .40sw for that matter.

       

      Of course at the end of the day it is all about bullet placement. If you can’t put it where it needs to go you have IMO no business being out there. But there is a lot of air around a moving deer. And they can put their body into any part of that they want to at will. Including floating over a 6 ‘ 4 strand barbed wire fence looking like they have anti-grav in their hoofs. Makes it hard to predict where they will be.

    • #45717
      Jniedbalski
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      My sks is a little light for deer but Where I hunt I dont have any long shots any way. Goodsteel I will get ahold of u soon about the 1851 thanks.

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