This topic contains 9 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Goodsteel 2 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #32885
     mountain4don 
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    I have an old Mauser type bolt action rifle that was converted to 7.62 NATO a long time ago. On the forward barrel near the front sight is the following stamped in the barrel: SAMCO M1A FL 308W, and what I think reads: VIEDO SPAIN, then there are about 5 unreadable characters after that. About 25 years ago I bought this from SAMCO as I had an FFL at that time, and just wanted a rifle in 308 WIN. It looks like the rifle was probably converted from 7 mm Mauser when Spain joined NATO, by replacing the barrel as the barrel looks brand new, and adding a 1/4″ thick piece of aluminum in the front of the magazine to produce a ramp for the shorter 7.62 NATO cartridge to ramp up into the barrel when loading. The rifle shoots 308’s ok, but the barrel strap that holds the upper hand guard in place is slightly loose and the hand guard slides forward in recoil and then hits the rear of the sight, adjusting it higher and higher the farther the hand guard slides forward. Unless I grab the middle stock strap and pull it back and push the rear sight down after each shot is taken. So, my question is, how can I fix this. The machine screw that tightens up the barrel band is as tight as it will go as the ends of the band are touching and the strap holder that is attached is hard to move if I try to tighten the machine screw any more, as it fits between tabs on the side of the barrel band. This band though is not real tight on the front end of the wood hand guard. Should I take the barrel band off and put something between it and the wood hand guard to shim the band tighter? This would tighten the hand guard on the barrel maybe? Or should I shim the upper hand guard up off contact with the lower stock at the sides of the barrel to raise it up so the barrel band clamps tighter on it. Or is there another solution?

  • #32893
     Mike F H 
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    Take the barrel band off and wrap some tape around the hand guards then clamp up the band.

  • #32903
     mountain4don 
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    Mike F H;n13444 wrote: Take the barrel band off and wrap some tape around the hand guards then clamp up the band.

    Any suggestions for type of tape that will last awhile? Duct tape? Plastic electrical tape? Something special?

  • #32916
     Josh Smith 
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    mountain4don;n13464 wrote:

    Any suggestions for type of tape that will last awhile? Duct tape? Plastic electrical tape? Something special?

    Hello,

    Don’t use tape; use cork.

    A cork pad on top of the barrel and one on the underside, between the barrel and wood, will center the barrel, float it for most of its length, provide a known pressure point, and prevent the movement of the handguard.

    If interested, I have written articles using the Mosin-Nagant as the subject, but will apply to almost any bolt rifle from that era. You may find the articles at http://smith-sights.com in the “articles” section.

    Regards,

    Josh

  • #32963
     Goodsteel 
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    This is the correct answer.

  • #32997
     mountain4don 
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    Josh Smith;n13482 wrote:

    Hello,

    Don’t use tape; use cork.

    A cork pad on top of the barrel and one on the underside, between the barrel and wood, will center the barrel, float it for most of its length, provide a known pressure point, and prevent the movement of the handguard.

    Josh

    Thanks Josh. I was able to take off the upper hand guard without any problems and see how a small piece of cork/rubber gasket material would fit. I happened to have a whole roll, minus a few inches, in the garage with a thickness of 1/16″ that I use for mounting water pumps and fittings on my tractors. I am now looking for some help in removing the bottom part of the stock. How does it come off? I see the two screws that pass up through the lower trigger guard at the rear just behind the trigger guard and at the front, just in front of the lower magazine cover. But there is also some sort of cross bolt that takes a pin wrench of some sort from one side to the other side of the stock at the front of the action. Does this need to be removed somehow? And what happens at the muzzle end with the bayonet mount band? I see no screws or anything in it holding it on?

  • #32999
     mountain4don 
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    I worked on my M1916 Spanish Mauser that had been converted to shoot 7.62 NATO, after viewing several videos on U-Tube. It was clear what had to be taken apart in order to insert pieces of 1/16″ thick cork/rubber gasket material in the barrel channel above and below the barrel where the loose front band was located. Performing the job was quite easy after viewing my exact rifle being dismantled and then put back together. While I was in there I cleaned it all up and then inserted 1/2″ wide pieces of the gasket material for the full circumference of the barrel split into two pieces so I could push separate pieces into the upper and lower stock/hand guard pieces of wood. Then I put it all back together and its ready to take out and shoot for a trial run. Thanks everybody for your suggestions.

  • #33042
     Mike F H 
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    mountain4don;n13603 wrote: I worked on my M1916 Spanish Mauser that had been converted to shoot 7.62 NATO, after viewing several videos on U-Tube. It was clear what had to be taken apart in order to insert pieces of 1/16″ thick cork/rubber gasket material in the barrel channel above and below the barrel where the loose front band was located. Performing the job was quite easy after viewing my exact rifle being dismantled and then put back together. While I was in there I cleaned it all up and then inserted 1/2″ wide pieces of the gasket material for the full circumference of the barrel split into two pieces so I could push separate pieces into the upper and lower stock/hand guard pieces of wood. Then I put it all back together and its ready to take out and shoot for a trial run. Thanks everybody for your suggestions.

    My suggestion of using tape was a quick/rough ex farmer type of repair,the gasket material solution is also a barrel bedding job,lots of .303’s were packed on the top hand guard with cork when they were the target rifle here.I am pleased you have it fixed.

  • #33056
     mountain4don 
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    Mike F H;n13658 wrote:

    My suggestion of using tape was a quick/rough ex farmer type of repair,the gasket material solution is also a barrel bedding job,lots of .303’s were packed on the top hand guard with cork when they were the target rifle here.I am pleased you have it fixed.

    Well thank you. But I am not an ex farmer. And those of us that farm full time have loads of different types of gasket material out in the shop. Including several different thicknesses of the cork/rubber stuff. Well, I took the rifle out yesterday and fired about 40 rounds through it successfully without the hand guard slipping back very far. It moved maybe 1/64″ back forward and then stopped there. Surprisingly the group on my 125 yard target shrunk from a bunch of flyers in a 12″ circle down to a nice 3″ group shooting off the bench with the original open sights. The only problem left to fix is the slider on the sight ramp moves one notch forward after each shot. The slider has a spring loaded plunger that fits in notches on the opposite side of the sight ramp but for some reason the first notch is loose and allows the sliding rear notch sight to jump forward. Set on the second notch at 300 meters it doesn’t move when firing. I guess I could just leave it on the second notch and compensate by holding low on the target.

  • #33114
     Goodsteel 
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    Funny how that works eh? LOL!
    Glad you got it figured out.

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