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    • #48880
      JRR
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      I found this at an estate sale.

      From what I can discern, it still has the military barrel, turned down with a full length rib added.  In faint numbers on the barrel near the receiver 7.92 otherwise known as 8mm.   An 8mm dummy round fits and chambers.  I think it should be checked for 8mm/06.  I’ll drop an 8mm dummy into the chamber without the bolt and see if it falls in too far.  I don’t know if the trigger is a modern version or old.  No markings.  It works great.

    • #48881
      JRR
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      Another

    • #48882
      JRR
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      Another

    • #48883
      Artful
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      Nice Find – you could just do a casting of the chamber.

    • #48885
      Glenn
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      You might want to slug the bore.  Some of the sporting rifles were made with a .318″ barrel instead of .323″ .

      Did you find just the barreled action, or the whole rifle?  Very nice find either way.

    • #48890
      JRR
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      It does have a stock and sling.  It’s definetly not a military stock.  Has a pachmeyer pad and a cheek rest on the left side.  The bore is .323″.  Inletting has two “L” shaped metal inserts that bare against the recoil lug.

      Does anyone have an idea where the receiver was made.  See photo above.

       

    • #48891
      Glenn
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      A picture of the front receiver ring might help.

    • #48892
      JRR
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      The top of the receiver on the front ring has been knurled.  A textured surface.  The only marks on the receiver are the ones in the photo above.  It looks like a human face with hat above an N.  The left side of the front ring.

      Here it is again

       

    • #48893
      JRR
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      Here is the top of the front ring.

    • #48894
      Glenn
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      I’m not sure about the Face over the N, but the rest of it looks similar to the rifles that were made in the Arab countries by small shops that would take a rifle, Mauser, and duplicate it, then pass it along to the next shop…

      They would crank out a complete rifle starting from scratch, then use that as a pattern for future work.  Some of the patterns would be passed along to the next shop… so the tolerances might slip going from one shop to the next, so parts would not necessarily be interchangeable from one shop to the next…

      The safety looks like one of the ones you can get commercially, the MKII ??, from Brownells??

      I’d be interested in seeing how it shoots.  A chamber cast might be in order to see how close the chamber is.  If it’s longer than spec, you could always seat a bullet out long to engage the rifling, then fireform to make brass to fit your chamber.

      Anyway, that’s my 2 cents worth.

    • #48946
      skeettx
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      This should be helpful

      http://www.shotguns.se/html/germany_1890-1945.html

      See Item #17

      Please try to find a date code

      See Item #29

      Mike

       

    • #48963
      JRR
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      It looks like the receiver matches up with #19 on the chart.  Very early 20th century.  It has a measured .323 barrel.  Probably different than original.

      When was the changeover from .318 to .323?  Most likely the reason for the barrel swap?

      I will test with some low pressure cast loads on Thurs or Fri.

      Thanks for the link to the receiver I.D. markings.

       

    • #48964
      Goodsteel
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    • #48965
      Glenn
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      Excellent article.  I’d like to buy a few if we could get them here legally.

      The .318″ groove dimension was for the original 8×57 in the model 88 Comission rifle.  When they switched to the Mauser, they went to the .323″ barrel instead.  I’m not sure of the time frame.  I have read where they used to make sporting ammunition for the .318″ and the .323″ also.

      Here’s a link to more accurate detail than I can remember.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/7.92%C3%9757mm_Mauser

    • #48967
      uber7mm
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      1905, was the change over from I (infantry) to IS (Infantry Spizter) bore (or J to JS in American English).  They (the German Military) moved to the .323″ diameter bullet, and JS, by the enlarging the rifle grooves but keeping the bore diameter (7.92mm) the same.  As Glenn said, lots of commercial sporters, were made with .318″ grooves between the wars.

      The change to the spitzer bullet design sent the US back the the drawing board.  Changed the new 30 cal cartridge from 30’03 with a 220 grain bullet to the 30’06 with a 150-165 grain bullet.

       

       

       

    • #48976
      JRR
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      First five shots with low pressure .325″ cast rounds (215 gr. w 18 gr. 2400) went into a 6″ black @ 100 yds.   I will be installing a nice peep sight for my degraded eyes.

      Markings on side of receiver match up to the below.  Large ring 98.

      1891-1912
      Nitroproof for rifled barrels

      Stahl Mantel Geschoss (Steel Jacked Bullet)

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