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    • #47871
      Goodsteel
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      I have finally put to rest an issue that has been a constant thorn in my side for the past 15 years: The ability to lay down a perfect mat finish.

      It’s been a superb training situation because I have been forced to polish every last bit of the firearms to a mirror finish, but it’s hard to make a living that way when I’m burning 7 hours polishing out every Mauser action, and a 336 takes about as long. Also, as beautiful as a fully polished firearm is (especially when I do it), it’s just not pretty as a tasteful mix of mat and mirror that is equally well executed.

      Here are some examples of my work now that I have this capability. I’m sure you’ll agree it’s positively stunning. Bear in mind all the firearms shown in the following pictures were rusted and hard used when they arrived.

    • #47872
      Goodsteel
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      Here is a S&W model 41 I just restored. Wood was hand checkered and finished, and the metal was draw filed and block sanded.

       

       

    • #47873
      Goodsteel
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      Here is a Remington model 1100LH that was stripped, cold blued, dinged up and rusted.

       

    • #47875
      Goodsteel
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      As you can see, I’m “knock knock knockin on heavens door” now.

    • #47878
      timspawn
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      While the beauty of high polish is hard to argue, I have always been a fan of a quality matte finish. To me, it is more practical and better suited to a field gun than a mirror finish.

    • #47880
      kens
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      different strokes for different folks.

      different strokes for different gun usage

      High polish and blue looks good on a Belgian Browning, or any of the classics.

      Matt finish looks good on a service gun, hunting gun or similar.

      High polish & blue goes well with a figured wood stock, but not on a synthetic stock.

      Likewise a matt blue with a bright wood stock just wouldnt look correct, but matt matches synthetic stock.

    • #47881
      kens
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      Also, a good bead blaster cabinet is a tool of its own, if you use it to clean rusty, crummy parts, the beads media becomes soiled, and then you will forever get a finish that is mediocre, that is, it will be cleaner looking than crusty, but not really perfect clean.

      If you want a bead blasted finish to be perfectly clean, then you only introduce perfectly clean parts into the cabinet. the final part is only as clean as the beads inside the cabinet.

      then there is a multitude of types of bead media. From glass beads, to sand, to abrasives, to plastic media.

    • #47883
      Mooseman
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      Awesome work Tim !

    • #48081
      Goodsteel
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      You’re absolutely right Kens. The beads I use to produce the finish above were specially ordered (to the tune of $125 for a 50 pound sack) and nothing goes in the cabinet that isn’t pretty much draw filed and sanded. Of course the beads are expendable, and will be replaced, but take my word for it, there wont be much rusty metal going in there. If nothing else, a quick dunk in acid will take most of the bad stuff away.

    • #48082
      Goodsteel
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      Thanks for the kind word Rich! Welcome to Goodsteel forum too!!!

    • #48085
      Glenn
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      Excellent work Tim, I really like the contrast between the finishes.  The matt finish on the top of the 1100 should make it very usable.

    • #48095
      Goodsteel
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      Thanks Glenn. It’s actually very necessary to building and refinishing fine firearms to be able to do this, and it makes my bluing so much more professional looking IMHO.

       

    • #48108
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      Wow, that is really great finishing. I’m trying to get access to a bead blaster myself to work over my grandfather’s Iver Johnson revolver.

      BTW, I removed the rust from it — and several other badly rusted things — with Metal Rescue. Non-toxic, works pretty fast, and leaves a slightly dark finish. Might be an alternative to acid.

    • #48111
      kens
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      have you tried removing rust by soaking in vinegar? a 24hour soak does a amazing job

    • #48122
      Goodsteel
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      Kens, I used to use vinegar, but a 24 hour soak is not in the cards for me. I use a much stronger acid and get to the same point in 10 minutes.

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