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    • #23260
      Goodsteel
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      Here is Bumpo’s lead alloy calculator. This is my favorite one. I have changed the content of COWW’s to reflect the findings of my many many XRF tests because they were dramatically different than what the original alloy calculator claimed. Other than that, it’s original.

    • #23316
      Wheel Gun
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 2
      • Comments: 43
      • Overall: 45

      Something just clicked as I have had downloaded this a couple of times a while back and couldn’t get it to work. Today it is working like a dream, what a great tool!!!! Thanks Bumpo and Tim!
      WG

    • #23323
      Goodsteel
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      Can’t imagine schmelting lead without this calculator. I’ve downloaded just about every one I could find, but I always come back to this one.

    • #23332
      Wheel Gun
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      Goodsteel;n1294 wrote: Can’t imagine schmelting lead without this calculator. I’ve downloaded just about every one I could find, but I always come back to this one.

      I like the idea of consistency but because I’m working with entirely handgun I’ve been able to get by. I always test with the LBT to confirm but now that the COWWs are not so readily available soon I’ll have to start to do some mixing with some other lead that I’ve been tucking away. I stashed a good bit of tin based babbitt and lino to mix with my roof flashing so this calculator will help keep the guess work to a minimum.

    • #23746
      Smoke4320
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      Just don’t understand why anyone would want a lead calculator when a plastic one is so much lighter 🙂 🙂

      used this many times to get same end result for different alloy lots

    • #23757
      Goodsteel
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      Smoke4320;n1819 wrote:
      Just don’t understand why anyone would want a lead calculator when a plastic one is so much lighter 🙂 🙂

      LOL! Good one.

    • #23871
      Pasturedrag
      Participant
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      • Overall: 15

      1st time I’ve played with an alloy calculator, thanks Bumpo & Tim.

    • #25246
      Waksupi
      Participant
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      • Posts: 6
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      • Overall: 112

      I can’t get the darned thing to open for me.

    • #25540
      GRN
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      • Overall: 1

      Hi new member here. I cant get it to open either

    • #25805
      chutesnreloads
      Participant
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      • Posts: 4
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      • Overall: 165

      Find I’ve downloaded this before,twice.Still not opening.Maybe we need a class on opening zipped files:o

    • #25828
      Anonymous
      Inactive
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      • Posts: 5
      • Comments: 71
      • Overall: 76

      Still not opening.

      Are you running windows 7 by chance? I dowbloaded Open Office on my Windows 7 Home Premium just to open the calculator, and no luck. Windows 7 and Open Office have compatibility issues.

      Being a stuborn sort, that was the end of my excel experience.

    • #25833
      Mike W1
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 2
      • Comments: 19
      • Overall: 21

      It opens with Open Office for me running Win7 Professional. FWIW

    • #31224
      kens
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      How do you use the calculator?
      I open it and it has a great many alloys listed.
      But, if I got a pot full of COWW, then how do I tell how much tin to add, or how much 95/5 solder to add to get a good house alloy?

    • #31225
      Goodsteel
      Keymaster
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      Noodle around with it.
      I just try to be logical about it. So like yesterday, I wanted to see what the ratios would be to make Lyman #2 from Roto superhard, 63/37 solder, and pure lead.
      So, first I wanted to add enough solder to the superhard to levelize the tin and antimony, so I stared with 10lb of Superhard and started playing with the solder. Punch in the number and hit enter and your new alloy is displayed on the bottom line under the two custom alloys.
      Once I got the right mix of Superhard and solder, I started adding pure lead till the tin and antimony were both reduced to 5%.
      Voila. Lyman #2.

    • #31226
      Goodsteel
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      One thing I cannot stress enough is that the COWW must be set at less than .5% tin (I just zero it) and the antimony at 2.5%.
      A better idea is to smelt all your COWW into one or two BIG batches and send BNE a sample of both for XRF testing. That way you KNOW what you’ve got.

    • #31227
      Goodsteel
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      When smelting a new alloy, and you need a weird weight from your solder, or whathaveyou, tare a ceramic bowl on your ten pound food scale, then hold an ingot with pliers and use a torch to melt the exact amount of metal into the bowl.
      Using this method, you can BULLSEYE your weight ratios and be very sure of what you’ve got.

    • #31229
      kens
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      Yes, I should make a big batch of alloy , and XRF it, and have three different alloys easily handy.
      95/2.5/2.5 air cooled, and the same stuff water dropped gives 2 different alloy from the same basic batch.
      Then you can have pure soft lead for the 3rd.
      So, my basic question would be:
      Does anyone have a good shop drawing of how to cut up a old propane tank into a decent lead pot (smelter)?

    • #31230
      Anonymous
      Inactive
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 13
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      • Overall: 86

      I also could not get it to open using firefox/ chrome /Ie

    • #31231
      Goodsteel
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      You could get a 12″ diameter piece of steel pipe, and have a welding shop weld you on a steel plate for a bottom, and put rebar handles on it.
      Thats what I use.

    • #31377
      Chris C
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      • Posts: 12
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      For those of you unable to open it, I had the same problem. Download it and “save” it to your computer. Don’t try to read it without extracting the zip file. At least that was the mistake I was making. Once Bumpo taught me how to use it, it’s something I can’t imagine any caster being without.

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