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    • #46589
      kens
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      Where do you get a bolt jewelling fixture?

      i’ve looked everywhere, can’t buy one.

      If jewelling was so popular back in the day, where are all the old ones on Ebay, craigslist, etc.??

      Where did they all go? New or used, where are they?

    • #46591
      Goodsteel
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      They are so easy to make, there’s no sense buying one.

      I’ll see if I can post a picture of mine later.

      This is not an extremely precise thing, and most adjustments are perfectly fine doing by eyeball.

      All you need is two opposing 1/2-13 bolts with points turned on them, and a single pin protruding at 90 degrees just behind one of them. The Remington 700 bolt thread is 1/2-13, so that’s a gimme, but the point will fit in the back of almost any bolt body. The opposite point goes in the firing pin hole, and the two are tightened together to give a limited slip situation. you just lay down a row, then yank a twist on the SOB to line up the next row and get back to pecking.

      Makes a beautiful machine turned look.

      As an aside, Brownells sells an awesome tool for doing this that basically consists of a cratex rod of about 3/16″ held in a brass tube. The brass keeps it sharp, and the cratex cuts fast and makes very sharp turn marks.

    • #46596
      kens
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      I have seen the internet plans where you build one out of wood, with pointed bolts as you suggest, and a pointer to indicate a index wheel fashion thing.

      I got a little lathe with drive gears, Hmmmmmmmm??

    • #46597
      kens
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      Does anybody offer the Cratex burnisher on a Dremel mounted shank??

      (1/8″ collet) ??

    • #46598
      Goodsteel
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      No. but a Dremel is the wrong tool to be using. I could actually jewel a bolt without a fixture, but you’ve got to have some control over the burnisher so that when you touch it to the curved surface of the bolt, it doesn’t walk around. The trick to getting those pretty patterns is to make each spot perfectly contained, and you have to press hard to get the burnisher to wrap around the diameter a little so you get a good spot. This is going to be like trying to drill a hole in a curved surface without punching a startpoint, IE: it wants to walk all over the place.

      Bare minimum for proper jeweling is a drill press with a hard mounted channel like a V block so things basically try to stay in place while the tip is spinning on the bolt body.

    • #46610
      Harter
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      Along the lines ……..
      Has anybody done or seen a blued jewel job ?
      I’m sure I saw one but it may have been a …….any way maybe not a cool look or maybe it doesn’t work out well . Maybe I just have eclectic tastes .

    • #46611
      kens
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      I had asked about nitre blued jewelled bolt  or extractor. Tim say that it rubs off too easily.

    • #46614
      Goodsteel
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      I have, and I’ve done it. Very pretty. The bolt is best left alone. The extractor is a compromise, but worth it if done properly.

      The place this really kicks it is the Mauser bolt stop release spring.

    • #46619
      kens
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      AHhhh, yes, Im getting a vision.

      jewel & nitre the bolt stop spring, clock & nitre the guard screws, nitre the (stand-up) floorplate button,

      jewel the bolt, & polish the extractor!!

    • #46620
      Goodsteel
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      There you go. It’s a quintessential look that we’ve seen 1000s of times, but the truth is, form follows function.

      Springs and screws are nitre blued because they used the nitre salts to read the color to get a perfect spring temper.

      Sliding surfaces like the bolt and follower were jeweled to reduce surface contact and make things slide better (it bears mentioning that real jeweling is fairly deep and feels like fish scales. I have done this on Milkman’s rifle and it certainly does give a buttery smooth feel to the bolt).

      Surfaces were highly polished to improve corrosion resistance. A mirror polished piece of steel does not rust very easily.

      These functions dictate the form of the work performed, and that is why there are unspoken rules about where and when each finish is used. Hot salt bluing was considered a military finish, and a poor substitute for proper rust bluing. When used on custom rifles, it is to be confined to non-moving parts only. Any moving part is given a different finish in classic rifle building style, with very few deviations present over the past 100 years, and for good reason. Everything about the build and implementation of custom rifles should be geared towards timeless quality. The finish selected is chosen based on how long it will last as the master gunsmith saw fit to produce it.

      This is why the extractor is a bit of an outsider. It is both a spring, and a moving part, and subjected to sliding action. Most gunsmiths see fit to polish it to a high shine, and relieve the knuckle in the center of the blade to reduce the scuffing that happens there, fully aware that the linear scratches will be roamed over easily by the eye as all the scratches run with the lines of the part. Others will jewel this part heavily knowing that the high points will protect the overall look of the blade. Still others will re-nitre blue after this jeweling, but that is considered a sin, and a cheap cover up, because the nitre blued surface was removed by the jeweling process already, and you don’t sell reworked parts to clients. The only way to properly nitre blue an extractor is to do so from the outset with no jeweling at all, but it will be seen as cheap and gaudy by discriminating observers. It can be done, but the rifle would have to be extravagant in appearance to pull it off. I recently made the decision to use this method with a rifle I finished that was started by G. R. Douglass. It sported an octagon barrel, three leaf folding sights, Winchester three position safety, and S&K scope mounts. It was extravagant and wild, and distinctly American, so the nitre blued extractor was a target of opportunity, and I took it because the bolt body was highly polished, as was the extractor, and there was no jeweling present at all. If there had been jeweling present, I would have definitely polished and jeweled it to match.

      Things have to be done with order and purpose, or they are not worth doing at all IMHO.

    • #46626
      kens
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      “Sliding surfaces like the bolt and follower were jeweled to reduce surface contact and make things slide better ”

       

      So, ummm, if you jewel a Moisan Nagant, will it work any smoother??

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