This topic contains 37 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  dellis 2 years, 11 months ago.

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  • #24590
     Reg 
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    Two new concepts both in transition. Wish I could claim credit for both but alas, I cannot. The little .32 necked to .224 came from a good person from ” the other side ” who was kind enough to share his thoughts and ideas, he was close. A test bed rifle was made up on a small Martini Rook action and was extensively shoot through mid 2013 to about mid 2015. I wouldn’t take it to Camp Perry but it is more than minute of bunny rabbit out to 100 yards.
    The action design with the cylindrical breech block is the basic brain child of Matthew Bryant, currently living over in Delta.
    The idea of the round breech block was kind of a holy grail for Frank deHass. His design, The Vault Lock is by far a much stronger but much and I do mean much heavier action. I had the opportunity to see and handle several of Mr. deHass Vault Lock rifles in Denver at the Collectors show several years ago and while the workmanship was flawless I sure would have hated to pack one around a prairie dog town all day, would have made you poor darn quick.
    Matt’s design too is not without flaws but safety is not one of them. The basic action is so simple that anyone with a small bench lathe and mill should be capable to crank one out, it’s actual physical size would determine the caliber it would be capable of. Do be warned however, the extractor system leaves some to be desired and I think there is great room for improvement and this of course would change a lot of what happens with some of the interior design. This is a work in progress.
    I chose to combine the two, small action, small shell. Actually considering where I live and what very few neighbors I have ( they shoot more than I do !! ) I could have made up a 155 should I so wished but no. I too like the bunny guns— and I use them too !!

    This will be a slow thread but there is much more to follow.

  • #24631
     Reg 
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    An addendum to the above photos.

    The one with the three loaded shells show several of the tested bullet designs that have proven to have hope. Two of the cast are the standard Lyman designs with gas checks and the yellow looking jacketed design is one I make on a old home made press using .22 r.f. casings as jackets. I make these using the same nose punch from 35 to 50 grain and they seem to preform in various rifles from .218 Bee to .223 at up to 2950 f.p.s. Have gotten groups in the old Bee as small as .550 at 100 yds. Performance on varmints has been excellent.

    What do you make one of these actions out of? I know there are far more scientific ways to look at it but what I look at is I have a good idea of the finished hardness of the parts should be. I prefer to work with metals that are already in a hardened state as I feel it helps with scale and distortion that might be there from heat treating. In this case the action frame was a left over piece of something or another given to me by number one son. Before he got a honest job with GE he had his own business making parts for WW-2 fighter planes, the P-40 to be specific. Many of the old WD type steels are not even being made anymore and often he had to substitute with a more modern steel. This was one of those cases. While I don’t remember exactly the alloy, rest assured not only is is more than hard enough but elongation and elasticity far exceed anything normally required.
    The bolt it self is a cut off shank from a Kennametal tool bar.at Rc.38. There again, good enough
    The tangs and a few of the small parts are simply any 1018/1020 mild steel. Springs and a few small parts are bits lying on the bench, anything that pivots I try to use hardened and ground dowel pins. Firing pin components are from Stressproof a form of LaSalle Fatigueproof. Other than the tang screw, all screws are hidden so I use Allen cap and set screws.
    I would love to case color this one but am real leary of what might happen with this super alloy steel in the heat required to form colors so will settle with a nice soft rust blue.

    The wood ahhhh the wood. A nice piece of Cherry we cut back in 07 in the flint hills west and a bit north of Coffeyville Kansas. It has aged long enough. A bit plain in appearance but I have learned to to like the color change that takes place in properly finished Cherry a few years after it is worked up.
    We only got but a few blanks out of that tree, it was about half rotted. Wish we had filled the pickup.

    Please feel free to critique or ask questions. The only dumb question is the one never asked.

  • #24685
     Wright Arms 
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    Awesome build. Do you have any suggestions as to reference materials? I aspire to build a rolling or falling block design myself, only with files and such hand tools. Yes, this limits my cartridge options and yes, I may not live long enough. It’s been done before. I want to do it myself. Either one gets it, or one does not.

  • #24707
     Reg 
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    Good reference materials include about anything by Frank deHass not so much as to actual dimensions for any particular design but rather to show design concepts. What is a hammer, what is a extractor really, what is their function, what is leverage, how does a main spring really work.
    I am not trying to complicate this but show what has taught me. By understanding relationships you can then almost design your own action or copy one that is existing.
    Basic machining skills are required but by trial and error you can get these. Yes, one can make a action with only files and a few hand tools but you are really limiting yourself. Small bench mill / lathe combinations can be found on craigs list and other places for a very small cost and as poor as some of them may be it still beats doing anything by hand. If you have never bought or used such machinery before don’t hesitate to ask someone with more experience. There is junk out there and if in doubt do ask. It is very easy to get burned in this department.
    A few years back there were a few blogs or forums that were devoted to making firearms, I haven’t looked in years but no doubt they are still out there. Join and ask, most builders are more than happy to lead the way.
    Read everything you can find. I have hard copies of concepts and ideas going back into the 1960’s and add to them every day.
    Most of all is patience—– PATIENCE.
    Screw something up– relax, learn from it and do it again. If it is still not right, do it again. Have faith in yourself. Yes, you can do it.

  • #24754
     Goodsteel 
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    Sweet looking build!!!
    I wish I had the time to engage in such lofty endeavors.

  • #24759
     oldblinddog 
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    Reg;n2864 wrote: Please feel free to critique or ask questions. The only dumb question is the one never asked.

    What is that cartridge?

  • #24788
     Reg 
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    The cartridge is kind of a wildcat dreamed up originally from the other side by I forget who exactly but will post it as soon as I can come up with a name.
    It’s basis started with the 32 S&W long shell but by osmosis has gone on to using the 32 H&R Mag mostly for the stronger brass.
    The idea was to come up with a shortened version of of the old .218 Bee that basically was a reloadable .22 Winchester Mag. Ya, I know, not really a need round but what the heck I am retired and have a lot of time.
    The first test bed rifle was made up using a small Martini Rook action but when I started making this small falling block action it just seemed to be a natural. It proved itself actually quite well in the Martini action. Accuracy was quite supprising but proved to be selective in bullet weight and form. Need to spend more time on the idea as soon as the new rifle is ready to go but it has proven to really show the difference in what I call “bearing length” or the actual contact of the bullet to the bore diameter as opposed to the actual bullet weight and total overall bullet length. I am sure others have noted this effect in the past but for some reason this combination really brings it out. It does seem to be fully repeatable. More on this later.
    Just for the record we have christened it the .218 Flea !!

  • #24921
     oldblinddog 
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    A reloadable “.22” would be a good thing to have. You are using .22 center fire barrels?

  • #24938
     Reg 
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    Yes, this particular barrel is from a Ruger 22-250 , marked 200th year.
    One would think it would work better with 50 to 55 gn. bullets but am getting good results with 40 grainers. So far testing ( in the old Martini configuration ) has only been done at 50 yards. I hesitate to post any loadings until the new rifle is up and going , I doubt if it will make any difference but just want to be sure.
    Have to keep in mind I am not looking for a 200 yard coyote killer but simply a reloadable 50 yard bunny rifle.

    Couple more shots from the WIP. The Martini stock is one I picked up at a Gun Show in Denver a couple of years back and it took minimal fitting to fit the Rook action. When I go to gunshows I could care less about the more modern crop of rifles ( not true, really would like a Cimaron 73 CRC in 44-40 but— but— but — )
    I pick through the scrap box’s and look for used bits and pieces on the tables.
    The side view is of the new action and the final fitting of the butt stock. Butt now under going finishing and the forearm is just about inletted. I am not fast with wood work. Come to think of it I am not real fast with anything !!

  • #24955
     Reg 
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    A few shots along the way.

  • #24957
     Smoke4320 
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    wish I had that kind of talent .. Keep us informed please

  • #24982
     Wright Arms 
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    Reg;n2947 wrote: Good reference materials include about anything by Frank deHass not so much as to actual dimensions for any particular design but rather to show design concepts. What is a hammer, what is a extractor really, what is their function, what is leverage, how does a main spring really work.
    I am not trying to complicate this but show what has taught me. By understanding relationships you can then almost design your own action or copy one that is existing.
    Basic machining skills are required but by trial and error you can get these. Yes, one can make a action with only files and a few hand tools but you are really limiting yourself. Small bench mill / lathe combinations can be found on craigs list and other places for a very small cost and as poor as some of them may be it still beats doing anything by hand. If you have never bought or used such machinery before don’t hesitate to ask someone with more experience. There is junk out there and if in doubt do ask. It is very easy to get burned in this department.
    A few years back there were a few blogs or forums that were devoted to making firearms, I haven’t looked in years but no doubt they are still out there. Join and ask, most builders are more than happy to lead the way.
    Read everything you can find. I have hard copies of concepts and ideas going back into the 1960’s and add to them every day.
    Most of all is patience—– PATIENCE.
    Screw something up– relax, learn from it and do it again. If it is still not right, do it again. Have faith in yourself. Yes, you can do it.

    Well, I have an old SouthBend Heavy 10 and the desire for a mill, but it may be awhile before that desire comes to fruition . . . . Anyway. I have this crazy idea to use some Osage Orange that has been seasoning ‘in the natural’ for 3 years now to make a custom stock for a custom rifle. Yeah, not the first time I’ve been told I’m headed down a rough road. Thought about an American Long Rifle build, but it seems if you don’t copy a known example, then your work is automatically discounted as amature dabbling, which seems ridiculous to me. Guess that’s why I’m no expert.
    Looks like I’ve some books to buy and reading to do in the meantime.

  • #24991
     Reg 
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    The South Bend is one heck of a great machine, I wouldn’t sell it short on a bet.
    I have seen stocks made from about any kind of wood one can think of and prefer stocks made of wood. I have noticed that many that say don’t use this or that or say that unless it is the finest French it isn’t worth messing with. Baloney. All too often those nay sayers are the ones that prefer some kind of plastic stock done up in the latest digital camo colors. ( man I bet that will bring out a firestorm of protest !!!!! )
    Anyway I have used a bit of “bow wood” but only as grip caps and fore end tips, my brother has even made a couple of bows out of it . It’s different which all wood should be. If you select your wood carefully you can get the yellow with some darker streaks running through it and it makes for an interesting contrast. As it ages under a good finish it will lose that yellow and take on a deep amber gold color.
    The one thing both brother and I have noticed about it, ( all woods are different ) is it is a bit tough and stringy but if your tools are razor sharp as they should be that alone should not be a problem. Once cured it is stable. Main problem I would think is that it is heavy and would make into a heavy stock but then again you could compare it with Screw Bean Musquite and Weatherby had great luck with it in their line of rifles many years ago. The extra weight was actually beneficial in the respect it helped disperse some of the recoil of the heavy recoiling cartridges.
    Another thing we did find out for sure is that if you are going to work it at all do it in a rough pattern as soon as possible after, cutting then cure it . Once it actually cures out it becomes as hard as steel and almost impossible to work. I swear we actually got sparks off it trying to band saw some.

  • #24993
     Wright Arms 
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    Yes, you are absolutely correct about the sparks. I have seen the same thing from dead limbs when cutting it with a chainsaw. Likely one of reasons it’s seldom worked with. As you have already said, it’s color is unique enough it would certainly make an interesting stock, I believe.

  • #25002
     Reg 
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    Go ahead and give it a try, you will never know otherwise. I would cut the blank while very green and standing, roughly shape but leave very oversize and at least one inch longer than required finish then while still dripping paint the ends and up the side about one inch with any kind of clear lacquer, varnish, what ever.
    You want the water to go out of the wood from the sides, not the ends.
    After cutting and sealing the ends I usually keep the wood very close at hand for some time. The first few weeks I look at it every day, after a couple of weeks then every other day, few more weeks then every third day and so on. What you are looking for is any crack development, it can happen from the ends but also from the side in some cases. At the first sign of even the tiniest crack I mix a small amount of Brownell’s Accraglass and drip it into the crack, if it goes in full depth, that is the best. That usually will stop that crack until the wood stabilizes. Keep looking for more cracks and deal with them the second you see them.
    After about a year I move the blanks from the inside to out in the top of our old barn and leave them for at least 7 years. Patience is the key.
    Have used this technique for at least 45 years on every kind of wood I have ever got my hands on from the plain Cherry to AAAA plus grade American Walnut.
    Have very seldom ever lot a stick.

    Wood for this Chicopee was cut in 2001 down in SE Kansas and cured as above.

    You can click on image for larger version.

  • #25033
     Wright Arms 
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    That is awesome looking wood. The methods you recommend are sound, indeed. However, in this particular case, it’s way too late. There was a ‘controlled burn’ conducted by the Village Idiot’s second cousin on a neighbor’s property. To make a long story short, the burn got into the decades-old Hedge row, burned the trees off at the stump, and they fell out into the field. Roughly 1/4 mile of it.

    Anyhow, this was 3 years ago, and most of the mess is still there. I don’t know if it’s workable or not. Tomorrow, I’m going over there with a tractor, trailer and chainsaws. If the sparks fly, I reckon it’ll be a short trip.

  • #25039
     Goodsteel 
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    Wow, that’s almost too pretty to look at. Gorgeous return on your investment sir!

  • #25045
     Reg 
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    Well, if nothing else hedge has proven to not only be a great firewood but I prefer it for smoking even over hickory. Get what you can it will be a win win at least.

    Over the years I have proven to be a royal PITA when it comes to wood. I see or hear where someone is cutting a tree down and I try to be there and in some of the cases it has really paid off. Also don’t kid yourself. Yes, I have picked up some fantastic wood but also a lot of it has gone into the wood heater out in the shop. Timing is critical, and even being perfect for timing when you are dealing with top of the line wood and you give it the best care you can many times it will split or pop open at the worst time. Highly figured wood is under increadable stress. The trick is to slowly release it through careful curing and again, even with the best efforts I have been in the final stages of shaping and had a crack open right in the middle of a feather. Sometimes you can stop it with the application of glass sometimes not.
    Try to take in some of the collectors shows if you can. I always make the Colorado Collectors show in Denver every year. At one of these shows you can see and in a few cases, handle the works of some of the old time gunsmiths often going back in the 1800’s. Note the wood. It is not uncommon to see failure in some places, usually around feather grained wood. Not always but it does show from time to time. I am hoping that using Accra Glas as a binding agent when these defects open up will make a better longer lasting stock for in the years to come.

    A lot of wood is sold on eBay as wet but can be cured and yes, this is true but even with the best of care, in figured wood you will sometimes lose it. Rather than take a chance on eBay what I like to do is since we travel a bit in the summer time, I usually try to look and plan ahead and try to find small family sawmills in small out of the way places. Many times these people really understand not just wood in general but the wood in their particular area. You can see and handle the wood and see exactly what you are getting. To these people, I would rather pay a premium and even with that premium it often turns out to be a bargain.

  • #25048
     Goodsteel 
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    Reg;n3348 wrote: Well, if nothing else hedge has proven to not only be a great firewood but I prefer it for smoking even over hickory. Get what you can it will be a win win at least.

    Over the years I have proven to be a royal PITA when it comes to wood. I see or hear where someone is cutting a tree down and I try to be there and in some of the cases it has really paid off. Also don’t kid yourself. Yes, I have picked up some fantastic wood but also a lot of it has gone into the wood heater out in the shop. Timing is critical, and even being perfect for timing when you are dealing with top of the line wood and you give it the best care you can many times it will split or pop open at the worst time. Highly figured wood is under increadable stress. The trick is to slowly release it through careful curing and again, even with the best efforts I have been in the final stages of shaping and had a crack open right in the middle of a feather. Sometimes you can stop it with the application of glass sometimes not.
    Try to take in some of the collectors shows if you can. I always make the Colorado Collectors show in Denver every year. At one of these shows you can see and in a few cases, handle the works of some of the old time gunsmiths often going back in the 1800’s. Note the wood. It is not uncommon to see failure in some places, usually around feather grained wood. Not always but it does show from time to time. I am hoping that using Accra Glas as a binding agent when these defects open up will make a better longer lasting stock for in the years to come.

    A lot of wood is sold on eBay as wet but can be cured and yes, this is true but even with the best of care, in figured wood you will sometimes lose it. Rather than take a chance on eBay what I like to do is since we travel a bit in the summer time, I usually try to look and plan ahead and try to find small family sawmills in small out of the way places. Many times these people really understand not just wood in general but the wood in their particular area. You can see and handle the wood and see exactly what you are getting. To these people, I would rather pay a premium and even with that premium it often turns out to be a bargain.

    That advice is solid gold. Well said!!!

  • #25054
     Wright Arms 
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    Well, I made it to the ‘scene of the calamity’ and saw no sparks while cutting, but I did see many, many checks in the 40″ logs I cut. Looks like this stuff is too far gone for anything but the wood stove. While the sap is still down, I’m going to cut some logs from standing, live stock and seal & store as you suggested. Probably best. I have an action to build before I can fit a stock, anyway. Plenty of time for wood to cure.

    Anyway, I have a couple of DeHaas books on the way and I’ve caused enough thread drift over ‘hedge’, anyhow. Sorry for my digression, and thanks for your input. I appreciate it.

  • #25418
     Reg 
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    A little tied up right now, building a 14 by 32 foot extension to a building out back. Forearm is now inletted. Will be posting more of a update later but for now a few pics from the action build.

  • #25675
     Reg 
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    Still working on building. Framework up, ready to hang rafters and put tin on west side. Shaping forend when time allows but in the mean time a bit more eye candy.

  • #26013
     Reg 
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    Snowing today so worked inside. Forend finished and now taking finish.

    I have a full setup for hot blueing but have used it so seldom in the last couple of years and the salts really need to be replaced and am having difficult time trying to convince myself to spring for another 5 gallon bucket and since I have several needing blueing decided it was time to break out the old Herters rust blue.
    Again there is only a partial bottle that has been setting for at least 10 years so decided to just run a small batch on the stove top. ( wife was gone )
    It has been a while since I used this system but even though it takes a little bit more work than just throwing in the hot tank , it really will produce a good, hard, long lasting finish.
    Heat holding mass is the secret here. I had forgotten that screws dissipate heat too quickly to really respond to this type of bluing but after seeing everything else was taking and the screws were still staying spotty, I pulled the screws, finished up and heat blued the screws.
    You only can go to a 320 finish using this process, anything finer and for some reason you get streaks and spots, 320 and everything works out very well.
    One trick I have learned is when you get the degree of black you want, boil the finial steel wooled parts for about 15 minutes in boiling water, then take out and quickly generously cover with a medium weight oil then take a course paper towel and briskly rub the finished part . Wear gloves for this as you want that part to still be very hot from the boiling. For some reason it will shine the blue giving almost a “Smith & Wesson” type deep gloss. Don’t buff and it will have a soft satin sheen.

    Only problem with this system is you must turn hardwood plugs to tightly fit both ends of the barrel after putting a thin coat of Rig in the bore. It will rust a bore if not so protected.
    Anyone can do this themselfs at home even on a camp stove. I know, I have done it. It is a bit more work in the long run than using a hot blue but I have found it will last fully as long as anyone’s hot blue.

    Will try to get the barreled action next snow.

  • #26022
     Wright Arms 
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    Got any photos of your bluing to post? I’ve started roughing out a .22 Hornet, and I’m planning to slow rust blue it, so I’m quite interested in this.

  • #26674
     Reg 
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    Just about finished with the rust bluing on this one. I did take a couple of pics along the way and soon as I can get caught up will make a short post.

  • #26676
     Reg 
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    Still in process. Lever needs more smoothing and polishing, wood needs many more coats of finish.
    Barrel and small parts turned out deep blue black with a nice shine but had a devil of a time with the receiver.
    I think it is the alloy. Normally I stay with 8620, 1020 or something common then heat treat as needed but in this case I used some what I think is a 4130 or something like that off shoot that was already heat treated. Tough as heck but it resisted the rust blue. Finialy did get some color to show but in the right light it looks mottled or not even. Am wondering if it might not have a very high chrome or nickle content ??? Will keep playing with this.
    The little Fecker Rock Chucker scope fits well on this one.

  • #26761
     Wright Arms 
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    Very nice work. Where on earth did that scope come from? Did Mr. de Haas loan it to you for a photo op? LoL! Seriously, that’s only the second photo of one I have ever seen and it looks right at home on one of these rifles.

    I’m making slow but steady progress on my project, straight from the Mr. Single Shot’s book. I’ll start my own thread once I have some interesting things to look at.

    Again, nice work and thanks for sharing.

  • #26790
     Reg 
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    I lucked out on the scope, one of those things a guy had one for sale and another fellow bought it and I made the follow up comment of “Gee, wish you had another ” and darned if he didn’t. It is in almost perfect condition with factory rings and lens caps. Believe me, I paid more for it that the several Lyman STS’s I have but worth every penny.
    Spent the weekend with #1 son and learned more about that block of metal he gave me several years back when he said, “Here, make something out of this”. Turns out it is a piece of 4130 he had made up as blanks for the rudder control horn for a P-40 Warhawk back in the days when he was making WW-2 aircraft replacement parts. Being heat treated 4130 could explain where the mottle look in the rust bluing comes from. It will make a good receiver as it is tough as heck but will look into other finishes in the future. If I do decide to replace the salts in my blueing tanks I might unwind the barrel and dunk it. Am sure there will be a color difference but being more uniform will help the appearance a bunch.

    Wright Arms, which of deHaas’s designs are you making, the Chicopee ? If so, it really is a neat , well thought out action. # 1 son made one a few years back and it really turned out well. There used to be a Gunsmithing school somewhere down in southern Colorado, not Trinidad, another place, and they used the Chicopee as a training aid. Each student had to make one. They were advertising at a Denver gunshow a few years back and had several on display at a table there, each a bit different but still the same basic design. I have often thought of making one of the vault lock actions but after looking at several a few years ago decided against it. A little big to suit me and went on to make a Farrow instead.
    Why not post a few pictures of your work so far. Might give others some inspiration. Some might offer good ideas, Nothing wrong with someone throwing their work out there, Accepting criticism of one’s work is a way of growing. Coming up with a good idea or a better way is only education and education needs to be spread around. I have no secrets and never will. Anything I know I more than gladly pass around. Some great times I used to have was when I tought a fellow who was working for me how to make stocks and the day he actually made better work than I did was the day I graduated.

  • #26806
     Wright Arms 
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    Yes, the Chicopee is the design I’m building. I wanted a reloadable .22, so I have decided to chamber it in .22 Hornet. I have never looked into how to post pics on this forum, so as soon as I take time to figure that part out, then I’ll post some photos.

    Like you, I find the Vault Lock designs interesting, but a bit oversize in the appearance department. I like the #1 design better, even though the #2 is the ‘improved’ design. But I’ll have to finish this one before I’ll know if I’m interested in building anything else. Plenty of time for me to think about it.

  • #26830
     Reg 
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    A few years ago at the Colorado Collectors show they had a few of deHaas’s rifles on display, a couple of Vault Locks and a few others that he had shown in various articles and a few he didn’t or at least I had never seen. Bet I spent at least a hour at that one table just looking, they wouldn’t let anyone handle.
    You can learn a lot from looking at others work. The Vault Lock’s were most interesting. Clever in how they were nicely made but the size of the things !!! I always thought that the Hoch action was big but these were much bigger. Be OK off a bench but I wouldn’t want to carry them around very much.

    It is too bad that the Story casting kits are no longer available. They were just kits and nothing more and did take a lot of playing with to make up a good solid action but they were a good basis to start with when it comes to action making. I had handled a few then bought one of the Farrow kits. Made a few replacement parts for it to fit things up tighter but it really turned out well. Still have yet to put a barrel on it but did pick up a Green Mtn. barrel in 32 cal. so it might wind up as a 32-40 which would be appropriate.
    Or also I have a blank suitable for a 44-40 and that might be interesting as well.
    So many choices, so little time.

  • #27005
     Heathydee 
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    Are these the plans you are working from Reg ? This is a good one

    http://s5.photobucket.com/user/metalshaper/library/Darcy%20Falling%20block?sort=3&page=1

  • #27035
     Reg 
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    It sure looks a lot like it. I started with a couple of simple line drawings and just kind of ran with it as needed. What caught my eye was the cylindrical breech block. I had followed deHaas through the years and that was one of the concepts he often talked about and actually made up as the two vault locks.
    I see your drawings have a name, Darcy’s Falling Block. Might there be any chance I could get a set of these drawings and has anyone actually made up one of these actions? I would like to play more with the concept especially in a slightly bigger version but if someone has already worked out a lot of the details I would like to see what they have done.
    One of the areas in mine that needs improvement is in the extraction system. I came up with what I thought was a good idea at the time and it does work but just doesn’t have enough travel to suit me. Because of the taper in the little cartridge I am playing with it has never failed to extract or has even been slightly tight even with some steamer loads that were used to pressure test the action. Also, since I had little to start with I think some of the geometry might be improved as well.
    If you could, would you tell me more at the action.

    Reg

  • #27042
     Heathydee 
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    This is all I have . I quite like the extractor as shown .It will work with both rimmed and rimless cases

  • #27043
     Heathydee 
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    I placed a link in my earlier post to some pictures of one of Darcy’s rifles .He does good work

  • #27044
     Reg 
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    Guess you learn something new every day.

    When I originally saw this action a few years ago it was just a couple of picture’s and a brief write up by a fellow on another site. He was kind enough to supply a small drawing and a old picture of what I assumed to be a old German rifle along these lines. From that I put together what I have now.
    Wish I had seen your plans from above, sure would have saved no small amount of work and guessing. It was fun though and I would do it again.
    Thanks for sending this along, it will really cut down on the mental labor part when I build the next one.

    Other than a couple of picture’s, this is all I had to go on. Now I am not even sure where it came from !!
    I wonder whose idea this was originally ??????

  • #27056
     Wright Arms 
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    I suppose I am just easily distracted, but I certainly like this trigger guard design more that those seen on de Haas designs. Me thinks I’m going to have to copy this. Perhaps this is Heathydee’s work?

  • #27063
     Reg 
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    It is a nice looking lever and simple to make as well. I started out by drawing it full size on a piece of 1/2″ cold rolled, clamped it tightly to a tooling plate then roughed out as close as possible to finish lines with the mill. It really got close to the finished size. Then followed up with several different files and did most of the finish sanding using a split rod in a drill press that held finer and finer grades of aloxite. It took far less time than I thought it would have.

    Interesting trying to find the actual parentage of this one. I need to find the original picture that I received showing the disassembled action. Looks very strongly old and German. I am surprised that if it is in fact as old of a design as it appears that deHaas didn’t zero in on it.

  • #34852
     dellis 
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    Reg;n5846 wrote: It is a nice looking lever and simple to make as well. I started out by drawing it full size on a piece of 1/2″ cold rolled, clamped it tightly to a tooling plate then roughed out as close as possible to finish lines with the mill. It really got close to the finished size. Then followed up with several different files and did most of the finish sanding using a split rod in a drill press that held finer and finer grades of aloxite. It took far less time than I thought it would have.

    Interesting trying to find the actual parentage of this one. I need to find the original picture that I received showing the disassembled action. Looks very strongly old and German. I am surprised that if it is in fact as old of a design as it appears that deHaas didn’t zero in on it.

    I can assure you it is neither old, nor german, though I have some german heritage:)

    I designed that action, I drew the diagram(not the CAD one) and I will post up pics of that one and the latest build in the near future. Nice to see someone making use of my design.

    Darcy

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