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    • #47052
      Goodsteel
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      New fangled janky stuff is usually just that, but when I jumped on the SS pin wet tumbling i was hooked. I’ve got this down to a fine science. I tumble for three hours in a Thumblers Tumbler almost full of water, a two second squirt of Dawn, and a teaspoon of Lemishine. Once that’s done, I dump the whole mess in a straining mesh (kind of a stretchy cloth like a seive) in a five gallon bucket in the tub.

      I lift the mesh out of the bucket, and dump the black water in the commode right handi. Then I fill the bucket 1/3rd full of water and dunk the brass a few times, then dump it in the commode again. I do three rinses this way, then put the media separation chute on the bucket, and dump the contents of the mesh into the basket, and tumble to separate the SS pins. Yeah, some of them jump out of the chute, but they land in the tub. I quick sweep with a magnetic sweep picks every last one of them up, and I rake them into the bucket with the rest.

      Then I take the tumbling baskets into the next room where the food dehydrator is. I have a small plastic tub there that I use to cover the hole in each rack as a pour brass into it. I message the brass around the rack till it’s all laying flat, then lift the tub gently. None of the brass falls in the hole. I clap on another rack, and repeat. This is usually done lickety split. Clap the heater lid on the dehydrator and switch it on then unhinge the baskets and stack them on top of the dehydrator to dry.

      I tap my foot for 20 minutes and take the baskets off the dehydrator. They are dry.

      I turn off the dehydrator and dump the brass into the baskets again. It’s all dry, but a little hot.

      Voila. I use the baskets as transfer trays as I reload. I juice up my hands with sizing wax/lube, then kneed the brass in the basket. Then I size/expand/flare it all.

      Then it’s back into the tumbler except this time no pins. I tumble in soapy water for an hour while I do other things then dry it again.

      I prime all the brass and either store it in it’s uber clean, super sweet condition, or I go ahead and charge it and stuff in the bullets.

      Yep. Now that I have the drying figured out, and I good place to get water and drainage, this is THE WAY to ROLL, PERIOD. Love my wet tumbling.

    • #47069
      kens
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      Have you tried soaking your brass in a citric acid soap solution?

      I find that this alone gets off 85% of the crud.

    • #47078
      Goodsteel
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      Yes I have. I used to do that as prep for walnut tumbling, but it never got the pockets or the neck suitably clean, and I would end up brushing both. Now that SS pins are here, its no longer an issue.

    • #47084
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      Has anyone here ever had a problem with ignition due to the primer pocket not being clean? I think as long as the hole to the case body is open, and the primer is solidly seated, it will work. Every time. I’ve not had any failures in many decades of reloading. While I like the idea of squeaky clean and shiny primer pockets and inside the case neck areas, the less-than-spiffy ones seem to always work. They have been for many decades. Is there a true and proven reason to go to SS pin tumbling, or is it just a cosmetic thing? I’m looking for real facts here, not just “seems it helps” kinda stuff.

    • #47085
      kens
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      I have reloaded a bunch with no case prep at all besides sizing & priming

      sometimes I want the stuff pretty, and sometimes I just want to go shootin’

    • #47086
      Goodsteel
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      Well kens, let me be clear: I could give a dam about pretty. The appearance of my ammo doesn’t blow my skirt up one little bit. However, when I’m seating bullets and primers, I don’t like to feel different seating pressures. For years, I didn’t tumble at all, and simply wiped my brass with a clean rag, then brushed the necks and the primer pockets, then reloaded. The problem was that as I brushed the necks, the brush would load up/get matted/worn out, and I could get no consistency. I tried this all different ways, but the results were the same.

      This was exactly why I tried SS pin tumbling for the first time, and I was glad to see that theory ended up becoming fact when all the seating pressure variances were drastically improved.

      The fact of the matter is that the most important parts of the case to get clean are the hardest parts to get clean, and by the time you do, the outside of the cases looks better than factory. Just because I’m willing to do what it takes to get the results I need does not make me a superficial reloader. It just means that if I have to take a whole shower to get my rear end clean, then I’m going to do it. LOL!

    • #47090
      kens
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      So, your saying that the manner you clean the brass affects neck tension??

    • #47120
      GhostHawk
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      Well I kinda agree with Kens.

       

      I have taken to the citric acid wash/rise myself.

       

      I have to admit I am a little O/C as after they come out I prefer to clean Primer pockets with a brush and give the case a roll on a clean white towel laid on my leg. Primer pocket brush also gets wiped off regularly. I have also been known to just use half a dozen q-tips.

       

      I deprime with a Frankford Arsenal hand depriming tool which lives upstairs by my recliner. So I can watch tv while depriming. Go setup the citric acid wash and let it soak half an hour, agitate several times, and rinse several times in the kitchen sink.

       

      For me that is fine.

      I can see why Goodsteel uses the pins for neck consistency. I don’t need to be that fussy. My business does not rely on it. His to some extent does.

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