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    • #26782
      goody
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      I have never had luck with tinting glue and a recent laminated gun stock project of mine brought me to the reality I must find this. I generally use TiteBond wood glues. I use the dark glue more than the yellow. My dad mixed powder stuff in water but I don’t have any of that nor do I remember the name. I also want to stay with waterproof glue simply because it is for gun stocks and I figure all the help against moisture I can get will help. Any advice from experience?

    • #26785
      Goodsteel
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      Use a clear epoxy that will accurately represent the pigment that you put in it.

      For vibrant colors, use RIT clothing die.

      For the various shades of wood, you need a belt sander.
      Turn on the belt sander and take a cheap plastic cup and let the belt sand through the rim of the cup.
      Take the cup away and blow it out, then hold it in the same position, but don’t let the belt work on it much.
      With your free hand, take a piece of wood of the same species you are trying to match, and feed it into the belt. The cup will catch the fine dust that is blown downward by the sanding belt. Don’t hold back on this. You would be surprised how much dust the epoxy can absorb and you’re after as much as you can get away with. You want your epoxy about the consistency of peanut butter and heavily laden with dust.
      The color when wet will be darker than what you are after, but that’s OK. Just put it on there and let it set up.
      Once it sets, and you grind it flush, you may think the epoxy line looks lighter than the wood it’s joining. That’s OK, just go ahead and finish the stock and tell me what you think then. If you do this right, you’ll hide that glue line like you wouldn’t believe.

    • #26809
      goody
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      thanks Tim, I understand what you mean. But I want to glue up a whole gunstock with 14 inch plys and I want black or dark brown glue so the glue joints that show will look good. That would take a lot of epoxy and maybe I should buy the laminate stock blank from a manufacturer rather than do it myself.

    • #26963
      Waksupi
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      If properly clamped, the Titebond should be invisible. I did a lot of stocks for Serengeti, and the joints are virtually invisible. Jerry Fisher was looking at one of my rifles a couple weeks ago, and could not see the lamination lines until I showed them to him.

    • #27025
      Goodsteel
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      I agree. Tightbond is good stuff and you can buy it by the gallon. I keep it in “stock” (pun intended) at all times. LOL!.
      Sorry I mistook your question.

      Out of curiosity, could your dad’s waterproof glue have been Resorcinol? I don’t recall it being mixed with water, but it does have a powder part that is mixed in, and is so waterproof that they use it to glue wood boats together, and I believe it is used to laminate marine plywood.

    • #28508
      lmcollins
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      I talked to the people at Tightbond not a few months ago about stock laminating. Tigtbond III is the one you want. Waterproof.

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