This topic contains 11 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Goodsteel 3 years, 6 months ago.

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  • #27881
     Butch Wax 
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    Howdy, first of all. Well organized forum and interesting folks too. Think I’ll like it here. (Big grin!)
    Did a search first about this topic but found no response, thus my thread/post.
    Being a somewhat older fellow and used to older technology, this polymer coated bullet business is very new to me. But I’ve dabbled with it now for a couple months and an sold on it. Sure, I’ve got the tried and true Lyman 450 and even the old Lyman /Ideal 310 Sizing Chambers for all I cast and load. But I’m moving more and more away from conventional lube and coating most all my rounds with the Hi-Tek polymer.

    I looked into the powder coating v.s. liquid polymer coated systems and went “wet” for my purposes. I buy the powder form of Hi-Tek coating as it’s easy to store and, for me, use by simply adding acetone for the fast mix. I’ve had some reasonable success and actually pleased with this system.

    A question to those experienced members here about heat and such. No matter how long I air dry when going into the oven the bullets “blister and bubble ” even if the heat is 400 or 325, or anywhere in between. Doesn’t effect performance, but does leave a rough finish on the round. Any suggestions? I’m all ears guys, and my thanks in advance.

  • #27889
     goody 
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    Welcome aboard, I also have a few years under the bridge. I PC with Harber Freight Red and shake and bake. I turn oven on place pc’d slugs in and when the coating turns to gloss I go 8 minutes at the 400 degree heat. I have never had a failure of any kind but have found in rifle calibers between 1600 and 2000 fps lubing with “simple lube” gives tighter groubs than PC only. I usually size the slug with gas check on, then do the shake and bake and run them thru the sizer again. I took hard wood and drilled for the nose to hold slug upside down as I want a perfect base with the GC on. Usually I gently wipe the red dust off the nose as I place them into the wood hole. I can get good groubs up to 2000 fps then they go south. I except my abilities and inablilites and when I want better speed I go to copper clad bullets.

  • #27918
     Butch Wax 
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    Thanks for the welcome goody.
    Glad to hear you’re having successful results with your powder coating. I studied both the powder method and the liquid polymer paint from Hi-Tek. My reasoning for the painted polymer was ease of application and reduced waste of materials. By adjusting the level of acetone mixed with the Hi-Tek powder, I can control the viscosity of the paint. I get great coverage with two coats. My only issue, I suppose, is more cosmetic than functional. It seams that no matter how thin or not when the paint is applied it will bubble and blister when heated within the oven. Normally this indicates the paint is still wet. I have gone as far as allowing an application three days to dry but still the paint bubbles. Altering oven temp has also failed to halt this bubble issue. I guess I shouldn’t complain that much as though the finish is far from smooth, it’s fully function.

    For over five decades I’ve used conventional lube on my cast bullets. This polymer coated bullet thing, though new to me, has really proven to be great. Super clean loading. And even after firing many rounds, my weapons are cleaner than even using jacketed rounds since there’s zip for lube or copper fouling left. Thus far I’ve only coated bullets for .38Spl and .357mag and I am pleased with the results. We’ll see how well it goes with a. 30’06 huh?

  • #27921
     Goodsteel 
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    I have never used HyTech coating, but I do wan’t to extend you a hearty welcome.

    I wonder if perhaps using too much acetone might cause this issue?

  • #27923
     Butch Wax 
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    Thanks for the welcome. I like your forum here. Appears we have some common ground as I had a gunsmith business for 20 years. Mostly pistol stuff as I was a full time cop and most of my customers were as well.

    Guess if I keep tweaking the mix I might find something that will work. I sure like how clean it shoots. Zero leading and zero lube splattering on my old revolvers. I used to think painted bullets were silly until I tried some and now I say, “wow!”

  • #27925
     popper 
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    No matter how long I air dry when going into the oven the bullets “blister and bubble ” Try low heating to dry., like 200F in the oven. I use he old liquid green for pistol, no bubbles or any funky effects. I have the powder 1035 gold and get very small bubbles no matter what I do. He changed the catalyst for powdered and IMHO, that makes some very small bubbles. I tried the gold in rifle and didn’t get good results, haven’t tried it for pistol but the Aussies use it with great results. Joe said the powder absorbes moisture, acetone does also.

  • #27927
     Butch Wax 
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    Thanks popper. One of my “side jobs” besides gunsmithing was paint & body work. I musta had 40 different types of reducers for my painting cars. Different air temps, humidity, and other things dictated what reducer I used. With this polymer powder stuff and only using acetone to thin the mix, I’m really just guessing at what I’m doing. Good to know about the moisture absorption. And I think you’re on to something about the catalyst creating bubbles from the powder mixture with the acetone.

    So far the powder/acetone mixture when done, though rough to the touch, functions. I suppose it could be worse like be rough and fail big time. 🙂

    Ya’ll shoot straight. Be safe and have fun!

  • #29366
     Butch Wax 
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    Well I’ve suspended the coating thing. Was getting far too many failures to fully coat. Bore leading. Paint chipping off. In short, it’s gone down hill. Suppose I’m just too old fashioned to make this stuff function 100%. I’ve returned to conventional lube and can only say it’s a proven system that I understand. The polymer coated system just ain’t my cup of tea.:)

  • #29367
     popper 
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    irst coating MUST be vey thin. You must do the wipeand smash test on each coat. Even then I sometimes get sizing removing the coating.

  • #29377
     farmerjim 
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    What popper said. The number one mistake is too thick of a first coat. I am also using the original swamp green. 3 ML to 150 9mm 125 gr bullets. You have to look hard to see it before baking..
    If the first coat is too thick it will not stick properly. If the first coat is bad nothing sticks. Also coating will be rough if you tumble them till the coating dries. Pour them on the screen while they are still wet. Don’t give up, It works once you get it all down correct. If you do any of the steps wrong it fails. It works great for me.

  • #29379
     Butch Wax 
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    Well guys, a further issue is I live in Texas. Right now 99 is the daily high. Add in the heat index and you got 105. I have to bake outside. And its not worth the trouble and brutal heat.
    Using my old Lyman 450 puts sized and lubed bullets on the bench in air conditioned comfort, and any time of the day or night, rain or shine.

    Nope, it was interesting and I did manage to make a few that performed well, but not always. Gentlemen, I appreciate the thoughts and kind words of encouragement, but I suppose I truly am old school. I do well with beeswax and Vaseline or store bought NRA 50/50. I’ll just leave it at that. 🙂

  • #29380
     Goodsteel 
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    Polymer coating (however you do it) is just another arrow in the quiver. good to know how to do it, and once you’re set up, you’re set up. I pretty much shoot bullets lubed with good ol fashioned grease or 45-45-10 tumble lube myself depending on the application, but powdercoat works too. Kind of a pain to get it set up and stuff like Butchwax says, but I’ll not condemn it. The worst I can say about it is that it’s the perfect answer to a question that was never asked. If people really want to shoot bullets without worrying about leading or accuracy issues, the cost of getting set up for casting, PCing, lubing, sizing, etc etc etc buys a WHOLE lot of copper jacket bullets. Probably more than a normal person will shoot in 2 years.
    I figure a bottle of 45-45-10 and a few ingots is the best way to roll from a cost savings standpoint?

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