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    • #26103
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      A lifer friend that talks too much about work, politics and life frustrations called late yesterday and asked if it wanted the shoot his new Henry 45 Colts. “Well yeah” !!

      So we get to the gravel pit and he gets it out .
      Nice lines
      Deep sharp checkering on the wrist and fore end.
      Matt bluing and satin finish wood of unremarkable grain.
      22″ heavy bbll (as Colts bbl go)
      Short ramp with a brass bead classic V with a centered white diamond below (easy to get on target)
      Sling studs for QD swivels
      No half cock, I found that odd but whatever.

      Man talk about slick ! The lever runs like greased glass with zero bumps . No cam over lock bump , hardly a ripple when the magazine feed is tripped .
      The trigger is short and crisp ,while not light neither is it heavy,I’d guess 4 – 4.5 lbs about the same as my field shot guns. The full recoil pad seemed a bit overkill for a pistol cal lever gun but again I don’t have to sleep with her so whatever.

      Did I mention slick ,smooth action ?

      The 1st 10 Bishop manufacturing Division of Federal Ammunition 250 gr RNFP in Starline brass were fired by the proud owner off hand and at 50 yd landed low right and about 8 1/2 x 11 . The 2nd
      10 were better but at 50 yd the generous brass bead covered 3 1/2 in of the 4″ aim point . These landed in about 8×8 . I find the Rosschester 92′ lever loop more comfortable but that may be personal preference the fluid action makes the squared lever less noticed.

      By the end of the 1st 50 factory ammo and 1 step of elevation and the old hood leaning rest groups were closer 4×4 and only an inch off POA .

      He tells me that $935 got him out the door and just another 110 for 2 boxes of the Bishop/FC and a box of 200 gr CBC ………..
      At least I have a supply of good brass once fired .

      If it were finished more shiny and less matt an if it is built on the parts as the 41 and 44 mag and capable of the Ruger start loads I’d say it’s worth the other $400 over what I paid for the 92′. Assuming that the 92′ is a genuine $500 value rifle at 800 the this parkerized Henry would be a good buy .

    • #26121
      Anonymous
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      Friend of mine just got a Henery in 357 Mag. Shot a box of ammo through it and was very happy with the gun. While he was cleaning the Henry he noticed that there was mark that ran the full length of the bore,not real deep, but you could feel it with a plastic pick. Calls Henry to return the gun, the fellow on the phone tells him that they have seen this before and they will replace the barrel for him. My friend only lives 20 miles from the factory so he wanted to just drive to the factory to return it. Can’t happen, the gun has to be shipped UPS on his dime, not a big issue. The turn around was fast, only about 1-1/2 weeks. My buddy is happy and heads out to his back yard range. The gun is shooting 12 inches to the right at 50 yards. He takes a better look and discovers that the new barrel is bent. Now my buddy is fairly unhappy so he finds the email address for the president of Henry Arms and sends him a message explaining what has happened. He has also returned the rifle to the shop where he purchased the rifle. The shop owner says that he will personally take the rifle back to Henry and get a new rifle for him.

      The president of Henry did personally answer my buddies email and promised that they would make the rifle right, and for his trouble they sent him a hat and a Henry rifle case. It took less than one week for the rifle to be rebarreled and test fired. Then one of the girls from the office personally delivered the rifle back to the dealer that my friend had purchased it from. Now my buddy is back to being in love with his new rifle.

      I guess that the moral of this story is that bad things can go wrong with any company, but the good ones step up and correct the error in a hurry.

      Looks to me like Henry is a pretty good company!

    • #26127
      Remmie
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      I have a Henry in.44 mag and I absolutely love it. Super smooth action and shoots better than I am capable of. Just got one in.22 and the action is so slick you can actually feel the difference when the magazine has run dry. Getting quarter sized groups at 50 yds so it is now my new squirrel gun. I am only getting 2-2.5 inch groups with the 44, But that may just be me flinching.

    • #26130
      Kevin S
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      I have looked at them in the past. But I just can’t justify there price.

    • #26136
      Goodsteel
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      All things considered, Henry isn’t blowing my skirt up with their barrel quality. WrightArms has a 357 he’s been trying to get to shoot less than 6″ at 100 yards. Found barrel constrictions under each dovetail in the barrel and a few that he could not explain. He’s lapped the barrel some, but I get the impression he’s still not too thrilled with the accuracy.
      You’d sure think that for the price, they would take better care to get the #1 thing done correctly (it’s called a RIFLE for a reason), but I hear many stories that say otherwise, or very happy people who only shoot 5 shot groups at 50 yards.
      Different strokes for different folks.
      If hitting clay pigeons at 50 yards is the accuracy standard, I wonder why the money would not be spent on a brace of Ruger Blackhawks that will each beat that figure soundly. Matter of fact, there are quite a few hombres out there shooting 6″ groups at 100 yards using various single action revolvers. In my opinion, any rifle worth it’s salt should be able to beat that.

    • #26138
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      I saw 3 things with the cases that would lead to better groups immediately. It was fired with just 1 brand and load ,so there is a high probably of there being a better factory load to be had.

      I don’t think it is possible to get a perfect specimen every time ………over 20% anymore , in a production anything. The Rosschester I bought 3 seasons ago needed some polishing in the action and in all honesty it should be rebarrled it has a dip under the front sight tha is readily visable and the chamber is huge and sloppy. . But as a “master reloader”, more accurately a maker do of custom chambes (polite for for poor QC spread across 146 yr of care ranging from impeccable to what was done may or may not have been done .)) I make it work . I think in the case of of the pistol cartridge companion rifles that we have today most shooters are happy with 3-4″ rifles because most of them don’t shoot any better than that. The shooters I mean. . From the Rosschester 92′ I need 4″ at 50 yd it gives me that with a broad range of practice loads and 4″ at 100 from field shooting sets. . It is better with the fire formed cases only necked and the Henry would also benefit from that. .
      My buddy moved the group 2″ left by not doing his hasty wrap ditching the sling all together might close th groups even more .

      Did I mention that I got 50 1x Starline brass and for going out to shoot a brand new once mopped out of the box rifle and that the shot placement and consistency was improving as he/we learned it’s quirks?

    • #26143
      Goodsteel
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      I think in the case of of the pistol cartridge companion rifles that we have today most shooters are happy with 3-4″ rifles because most of them don’t shoot any better than that.

      No offence to you personally, but I’ve heard this statement made before and it drives me nuts.
      Please allow me a small rant:

      We are talking about Americans here right? I think it’s much more likely they use that statement to apologize for the incompetence of the manufacturer…….and the manufacturers are just fine with that.

      Seems the last 30 years has been a contest between American gun manufacturers to see who can sink lowest in accuracy, and they get away with it by using the power of suggestion to make gun owners lower their standards.
      First they convince people that 100 yards is actually long range. Then they confused them about what MOA actually means. Then they convinced them that 3 shots can actually be used to demonstrate the accuracy of a rifle. Then they got them to shoot their guns at 25-50 yards. If you do all of this, then you can afford to buy 10 rifles rather than the one that our grandfathers were happy with, and convince yourself that you don’t deserve anything better because you’ll never shoot like your grandfather did.

      Things are changing though.
      Savage is a case in point. They are making superbly accurate rifles that even our grandfathers would enjoy shooting, and they are shaming the rest of the manufacturers into following suit, because it is painfully obvious to them that the average American deer hunter can shoot just as well as his grandfather, and he’s willing to pay for it, and he really doesn’t give a rip what the rifle looks like or what caliber it comes in as long as it will give him reliable accuracy.
      Ruger has slowed down the hammer forge that they once used to crank out shoddy barrels like toilet paper, and is now producing rifles that raise a few eyebrows. If you’re brave and honest enough to shoot 10 shot groups at 100 yards, you’re going to see 1.5″ groups out of your new Ruger GSR. You’re going to see true sub MOA out of your Savage bolt gun.

      This is happening because American shooters are waking up and deciding enough is enough. When we hold ourselves to a standard of precision and let our wallet do the talking, the manufacturers will start improving their ethics as well.

      I’m afraid that lever guns are going to be the last to get on the band wagon though, because they are not expected to shoot well, and those who own them might have just shot a tight group with the Savage 12, but as soon as the lever gun is in their hand, on cue, they immediately forget how to shoot when the rifle demonstrates shotgun patterns.

      Too many people have forgotten the accuracy that was possible with these guns back in the turn of the last century.
      I have personally seen old Marlin 336s and Winchesters that would shoot tighter than many modern bolt action rifles. Of course the guys shooting them suddenly remembered how to shoot when they started stacking their shots at 100 yards.

      It’s time to wise up and get a grip on reality fellers. There’s no excuse, absolutely none, for a rifle that cost over $800 that won’t shoot better than a handgun in the same caliber of half the cost, and if you need three shot groups and a 25-50 yard target to feel good about it, there is something seriously wrong. If you can’t shoot any better than that after putting 100 rounds down range, I have to ask: why not?

      Not that I’m talking about bolt gun, tack driving accuracy here. All I’m saying is that if you have an opening in the brush at 80 yards that is about 3″ in diameter, and the buck of a lifetime standing 15 yards beyond that, anybody who has spent time to work up handloads should be able to thread the needle and get the job done with an $800 rifle.

      How about pop cans? Doesn’t seem like too big of a stretch to expect to knock them over 8 out of 10 at 100 yards does it? Especially when you’re shooting next to a guy with an old semi auto 22LR doing exactly that?
      I used to have a good time shooting gum balls off a tree at 100 yards with my trusty Winchester 290, but I can’t shoot most modern lever guns any better than you guys do, and I didn’t suddenly develop a case of sometimers. The rifle barrels are simply not good qaulity enough to do it. Period. The rifle as a whole is usually made to great quality standards, but the barrel itself is made wrong.
      I’m currently trying to get my Browning 1886 45-70 to shoot a decent group. The darn rifle is superb, but the barrel looked like 20 miles of bad country road, and it shot like garbage. I’m jumping through flaming hoops of fire to try to save this garbage barrel because it has “1-3000” engraved in front of the rear sight, but the question that continually pops into my mind is “why in teh world did the factory think it was cool to put a piece of garbage like this on a rifle they planned on selling for over 3K?
      Same reason Henry does: because people will buy it, and rather than throw a flag, they will suck it up and decide they never really knew how to shoot in the first place.
      That’s tragic IMHO.

      Now, the answer is to send the rifles back when they shoot like garbage (if they are still being produced that is), and respectfully demand the manufacturer make it right. If enough people do this, things will change eventually.

    • #26165
      Remmie
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      I just re-read my post and it kind of left the impression I was shooting the .44 at 50yds. I am getting 2-2.5 inch groups at 100 yds. I should have been more clear. Also I am shooting 240gr. Lee TL sized at .430. Barrel slugs .429. COWW+2% SN. 13.6 grs of HS-6. I ain’t complaining about the accuracy, it is more accurate than I am. Of course I could just be one of the lucky ones that got a couple of good ones. Now if I can just get my 1950 Winny 94 shooting cast that well I will be happy. ( for a while, until I find another quest. Ain’t it fun)

    • #26167
      Wright Arms
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      As Goodsteel stated above, I have a Henry Golden Boy in .357. From day 1, it would shoot almost anything into 2″ or less at 50 yds, but shooting at 100 was like the difference between going to the moon and going to Mars. I tried countless load and bullet combinations. Every time something looked like it showed promise, the next group would blow out to 8″ or more. Non-linear dispersion and consistently inconsistent.

      Again, as Goodsteel already mentioned, I slugged the bore, removing the rod and marking the barrel every time I found a constriction. I found a total of 5. When I stood back and looked at the barrel and my marks, the reasons became largely apparent. One under the front sight dovetail, one over the front mag tube ring dovetail, one over the relief cut for the fore end screw, one under the rear sight dovetail, and one out in the middle of nowhere for no readily apparent reason.

      Now, I DID NOT contact Henry. I looked at the evidence, considered what they would likely do, and decided that their likely solution would not be acceptable to me. Would they have corrected the problem? All I can say for certain is I did not give them the chance.

      So, I lapped the barrel. It will one-hole at 50 yds and hold an honest 4″ 10 shot group at 100 now. Still not stellar, but WAY better than where it was. I may lap it again in the future, but I have another pet project I’m working on at this time, so the Henry is good enough for now.

      I did all my accuracy evaluations off a fixed, solid shooting bench from bags with a 3x9x40 scope on the rifle. I would submit to those reading this that the conditions the OP mentioned are not what I would consider adequate for evaluating a rifle’s accuracy. Just a good time foolin’ around with a new rifle, sounds to me like.

      This is not meant as a bad review of Henry. It is merely MY experience with one particular rifle. I am very happy with the fit, finish and materials used to build this rifle, but extremely disappointed with the on-range results. Would I buy another? Man, . . . . . I’d have to think long and hard about it.

    • #26172
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      Yes Wright that is the point after I have a load that works in a rifle that works I shoot field positions because it is more important to me to be on the freezer meat maker than all in the same hole although the later makes the 1st easier .
      We were in fact just out shooting the new toy and my friend getting to know it.

      I never approach a rifle with the idea that it is a 1 hole wonder ,I assume it will shoot 3″ at 100 with about anything and trow 2-3 in 20 . Until I start working a load ,which won’t happen for the Henry, I don’t even try to shoot 100 with a pistol Cartridge rifle 75 is a far more practical range . I actually posted this in several forums just because there has been a buzz about the 41 Mag limited run .

      On another point of interest as we ran through the 1st 50 factory rounds the rifle seemed to settle down and close the consistency.

      If I were to pick out the poor points ,the front bead is huge ,the parkerizing finish is ugly ,I don’t like the shiny white bolt in the matt black action the shiny rear sight is tacky ,the rich checkering is wasted on flat metal and wood. And he paid too much for the rifle . I could probably chop it apart nit picking ,but this is a field working gun 1st and a pleasure shooter 2nd ,it won’t be a competitive gun so the need list is shorter than the want/expectation list. Sure it’d be sweet to have a 1 hole wonder out of the box but he didn’t buy a McMillan Ziese MBT 40X ,he bought a Lin production steel Henry lever-action-rifle fun gun.

    • #26220
      Wright Arms
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      Ok, I’ll bite. You say ‘I don’t even approach 100 with a pistol cartridge rifle 75 is a far more practical range.’ Would you care to expound upon that? I’m interested in what you have to say. I’ve heard many theories upon this subject. I’ve heard claims I can not hope to reproduce regarding rimmed pistol cartridges in handguns. And I wonder why similar results are so elusive in rifles. At least in MY experience.

    • #26226
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      Part of this is a mind set and ,I hate the phrase, “hunting ethics “. I’ve thought on this a bit bit before responding because I’m a hopeless nuts and bolts wrench bender kind of guy. .
      1st back ground 40 of my all but 50 yr I’ve lived in a big game 1 by tag lottery draw statewhere the 300# hoof weight does and 400# bucks were distracted or suicidal if a shot was made under 150 yd by Joe average. Lately I’ve refined th [see skills to allow me to get a sneak on and close that to making shots under 80 a regular possibility. . I have also had sever occasions that have forced me to rethink my potential as a big game hunter.

      I have shot both a 45 Colts and 357 carbines to 325 yd for fun on steel . An 8″ stop sing is …….well 1 in 10 or 12 makes me all giggly. That particular 357 gained 40 fps over th 6″ Security 6 with 5″ 50 yd field positions loads it generally held 3″ at 100 . Since the 45 Colts guns won’t share brass they are fed separate loads and again with field positions groups hover around 5 and ” at 50 and 100.
      Trouble is while it’s fun to reach out for steel and paper it’s not terribly useful when my field experience has been pass shooting boars stretched out like a greyhound on the home stretch at 17 yd and another at 47 yd browsing.
      BC figures into my self imposed limits also.in the Nevada regulations you are required to have 1000 ftlb @100 yd. For rifles . What is interesting about this is (break out your load books ) a 223 loaded to maximums with a 55 gr BTSP will make the cut with about 10# to spare ,but a ported guide gun at 18″ will let you down with Remington deference loads of 350 gr HP as it will be right at the cusp possibly coming in up to 10# short. Now I’m not going to hunt elk with a 223 just because it’s legal and given the opportunity with a 45-70 I wouldn’t pass even in a ported guide gun knowing that a deference 350 HP isn’t on the menu. The hog load for the Colts carbine is probably completely suitable for 100 yd whitetails as long as the bullet beats the bark and it is put where it needs to be . I’m just a nuts and bolts meat hunter .

      There is another way time look at the “cowboy carbine /rifle” and that is as a sled long range rifle even if a 454 Casuall is at best a half load Win mag and 1/3 of the 460 Barret while the 357 makes a similar comparison to the 358 Win and 350 mag. They have those rainbow trajectories as well

      When it comes down to the end it’s really what you’re comfortable with and what you know the load,bullet and shooter is good for. I know I’m good for 75 yd on a 250 pig so that’s the line of nominal maximum range.

    • #26234
      Wright Arms
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      Sounds quite reasonable to me. The biggest reason I bought this rifle was just to shoot .38 Specials from it at 30 – 50 yds. And it is LOADS of fun to do that. But, I thought I might want to shoot out to 100 yds with it occasionally with .357 Magnum loads, and once I started down that road, things changed fast. I don’t regret the effort at all, as it shoots much better now than it ever has. Just wish the barrel had been right to start with.
      Anyway, hope things work out well with your rifle.

    • #26344
      dverna
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      I just cannot bring myself to accept a lever action CF rifle that has a magazine that loads like a .22.

    • #26349
      VANN
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      I feel the same, the idea just seems cheap. However the latest Henry rifle reproduction is right on the money so I guess it’s not all bad.

    • #26374
      W.R.Buchanan
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      these barrel constrictions are a result of roll marking and cutting dovetails in the barrels after the barrel has been rifled. I really don’t see for the life of me why they don’t reverse the order of operations and Roll Mark after the barrel is bored and then rifle after.

      If they are using Cut, Broached or Button Rifling techniques they would easily iron out any intrusions into the bore from these external operations, and eliminate these problems for good.

      Randy.

    • #26423
      dverna
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      Randy, that is how an engineer thinks. I bet the bean counters have a good reason to do it bass akwards

    • #26428
      Wright Arms
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      W.R.Buchanan;n4935 wrote: these barrel constrictions are a result of roll marking and cutting dovetails in the barrels after the barrel has been rifled. I really don’t see for the life of me why they don’t reverse the order of operations and Roll Mark after the barrel is bored and then rifle after.

      If they are using Cut, Broached or Button Rifling techniques they would easily iron out any intrusions into the bore from these external operations, and eliminate these problems for good.

      Randy.

      I’m not sure if it’s the cutting of the dovetail or the fitting of the sight/ring, but yeah. It would seem a simple enough thing to fix. I wish ‘they’ would.

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