This topic contains 17 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  WCM 2 years, 1 month ago.

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  • #33195
     Goodsteel 
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    I’m taking this purely from Hollywood, so take it with a grain of salt, but my curiosity is aroused.
    Recently, my wife and I were enjoying an old episode of the black and white Robin Hood show, staring Richard Greene. In this particular episode there was a scene where Fryer Tuck (Alexander Gauge) had a brace of pheasant or similar poultry (I forget the exact species) and he remarks how perfect they will taste after hanging for three days, but then expresses remorse as the third day is Friday and he will not be able to indulge in them.
    I know it’s Hollywood, and there was little care given at that time to accurately represent anything, but it’s one of those details that sticks in my mind and won’t let go. Have you ever heard of this, or know what process was being referred to/taken out of context etc etc etc? I know hanging beef and deer makes for some tender eating, but I would have thought it dangerous to apply this philosophy to poultry of any kind.
    Any insight?

  • #33205
     bjornb 
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    Back in Norway my dad would remove the ducks’ innards, then let them hang by their necks in the garage for 3 days. He would never let us eat birds that hadn’t had the hanging treatment. Now remember our duck season would run during cold season, so temps in his garage would be in the 30s. This form of tenderizing certainly made for some excellent eating.

  • #33206
     Rattlesnake Charlie 
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    Info from a reliable source, Hank Shaw, Hunter, Angler, Gardner, Cook.

    http://honest-food.net/?s=hanginer+birds

  • #33208
     bjornb 
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    Great article Charlie. Looks like my old man just didn’t go far enough……

  • #33209
     Waksupi 
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    I have seen an account somewhere from an old English game keeper, saying he hung pheasant until they dropped from the head. I’d pass on that.

  • #33210
     Reg 
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    I don’t know about all that. Have found out through the years that the bigger boys would lie to you just to see what you would do.

    Pheasants do tend to be a bit tough I think just because of the way they live, age may have something to do with the degree of toughness no doubt but I think they come out of the shell case hardened.

    We get a few every year. Just skin and quarter them then boil for a bit before cooking them any way you want, they are good.
    Letting them hang for a few days with innards in or out ?? Don’t think I would be any more interested in doing that than I would be about putting the munch on a deer I would find laying dead in the woods.

    Guess I am just too fussy.

  • #33211
     Rattlesnake Charlie 
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    I think it is like hanging beef or hogs, an accepted practice. First thing to do after killing is to gut and then cool as fast as possible. Hank Shaw details the appropriate temperatures. I’m going to try it with one I have in the freezer before cooking it.

  • #33218
     kens 
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    Some meats are better when aged, why not pheasant or poultry?
    Ham, is a aged pork
    Corned beef, is a aged beef.
    I did a corned venison, it was good
    What is the aged duck in Chinese, Peking Duck??
    There is dried fish, in asia. smoked fish too (I can attest to goodness of smoked fish)
    I suspect the only thing the pheasant needs is a good recipe for aging.

  • #33219
     Goodsteel 
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    Seems like I heard something like that long ago myself…..

  • #33221
     Sgt. Mike 
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    actually hanging game (fowl) for three days was an English custom, there was a bit more done to it than just hanging the bird beak down.

  • #33223
     Harter 
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    My Dad’s Dad did a stint on a cruise ship to Fiji ,circa 1928-30 , the cook swore by hanging geese 3 days on the after deck even on the equator for the captains table , so take this with a grain of salt they may well have been pickled .

  • #33229
     Bodean98 
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    I remember reading a recipe for pheasant under glass many years ago. The thing that sticks in my head was the birds preparation. It was beheaded, then hung with a tie around it’s neck until the skin turned blue!! No mention of eviscerating and it specifically called for not letting it bleed out. I make a common claim that I’ll eat anything that doesn’t eat me first. But there may be a few exceptions!:eek:

  • #33233
     Rattlesnake Charlie 
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    Has anyone here actually hung their birds to age?
    I’ll report on how my adventure turns out.

  • #33242
     Scharfschuetze 
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    I’ve often let the birds age, but never as long as the author of the article. To be honest though I’m fine with butchering them after they hang for a day. I prefer the amenability of mild pheasant flesh to seasoning with various herbs and spices.

    Just had Mango Chutney pheasant last night with fresh mangoes alongside sweet potatoes and corn. I have the most fun experimenting with different ways to prepare the birds and with my good Brittany bird dog, we manage quite a few every year. I often steam the flesh or in the case of the bird last night, an egg and flour basting to the breasts and then lightly fried in olive oil.

    I might add that during various tours in Asia and the Philippines, I’ve often seen waterfowl hanging outside. Over there, they usually hang ’em de-feathered. Probably due to the heat.

  • #33249
     Rattlesnake Charlie 
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    Sounds mighty tasty.
    I only got one this year while scouting for deer.

  • #33279
     popper 
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    FIL did it, had a Lab that got in trouble taking pheasant off other’s porches, so pretty common in German neighborhood.

  • #33280
     Scharfschuetze 
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    popper;n13943 wrote: FIL did it, had a Lab that got in trouble taking pheasant off other’s porches, so pretty common in German neighborhood.

    Now that’s a smart Lab, although apparently not quite cleaver enough to get away with it! 🙂

  • #33289
     WCM 
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    My grandfather use to hang up the crows he shot, but for a different reason.
    He said it made an example out of them and kept the others from stealing pecans.

    He also said public hangings of people would help prevent crime.

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