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    • #33871
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      In the attached photo the two gents appear to be wearing gunbelts of canvas. I’ve seen these for rifle cartridges, but these appear to be also for their revolver holsters. Anyone seen anything like this? It would preclude the leather corroding the brass cases.

    • #33873
      Phineas Bluster
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      It is difficult to tell, but it appears that these may be Mills cartridge belts.

      Mills Cartridge Belts – http://www.regtqm.com/Mills-Cartridge-Belt-p/wes-004.htm

      Indian Wars Accouterments – http://www.ushist.com/indian-wars_accouterments_us_iw.shtml#item3

      PB

    • #33875
      Sgt. Mike
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      Phineas I suspect you are spot on when I looked at the photo it highly resembles the Mills.

    • #33877
      Scharfschuetze
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      I would agree. The buckles look pretty military and the canvas cartridge belt was popular among troopers on the Frontier.

      You can get a replica belt here:

      http://www.regtqm.com/Mills-Cartridge-Belt-p/wes-004.htm

    • #33882
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      Yes, I believe these belts look like what has been presented in posts #2 – 4. I wonder how the gent on the left got his revolver holster to fit on it. Either I cannot see another belt or maybe he had a holster custom made to fit over the canvas belt set up for .45-70. I suppose it could hold .45 Colt ammo too.

    • #33885
      Scharfschuetze
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      A side note to this is that the inventor of the US Army woven belts was Anson Mills. At the Battle of the Rosebud during the 1876 Indian Campaign, he was a lieutenant serving under General Crook. At the time, cavalry troopers made their own canvas belts, often called “prairie belts,” or bought them from the post sutler. Mills, improved on the design and I believe received a patent for his weaving process. He retired a general from the US Army.

      His woven belt and weaving process went on to influence military web gear for over a century in many armies.

    • #33887
      Screwbolts
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      The ” Mills” belt, The late Frank Marshal often wrote in his articles about shooting sessions starting with a full Mills belt of loaded cartridges.

      Ken

    • #33889
      Larry Gibson
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      The gent on the left in the photo has a “Mexican Loop” style holster. This style has a large back folding down with one or two loops slit in it for the holster nose to stick through. Appears the gent has a two loop design that has a slot big enough for the Mills to slip through…..most do. You can see mine in this photo. It is the holster to the right on the gun belt. Plenty of room for it to fit over the Mills belt.

      The cavalry also issued a small loop belt that attached to the bottom of the Mills which held twelve 45 cal cartridges for the issue handgun, either Colt SAA or Schofield.

      Larry Gibson

    • #33893
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      Thanks Larry. That does appear to be the case.

      BTW, nice wild west outfit you have there.

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