This topic contains 8 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  kens 2 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #46716
     kens 
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    I used to be pretty good at deer hunting from a climbing tree stand. I also took a few deer sitting on the ground. Now I don’t climb like I used to. I had a near accident one time and I slowed down the climber. Last year I tried to climb and just put the rig back in the truck. phooey on that.

    So now I use ladder stands, set it up ahead of time and let it be.

    Now I’m looking more into ground blinds. I got the camo burlap (it’s smelly), and camo fabric with the leafy cut-outs. I been running a cord around 3 or 4 trees clustered together, and sort of hang out laundry with the camo fabric. I got 2 deer like this so far. I want to step up my game.

    How have you guys ‘brush in’ or ‘better conceal’ your ground blinds?  The fabric just hanging out like laundry is better than nothing, but it still a squarish block in the woods. How you guys finish it out?

    I have looked at the pop-up blinds that are like a tent, I dont see much difference, it is still ‘squarish’ looking.

  • #46718
     GhostHawk 
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    My best ground blinds were me dressed in camo (bow season) a 5 gallon bucket, and a cornfield.

     

    Back right into the edge. Leave just enough room so you can move your arm slow without scraping a cornstalk.

     

    I had a doe walk right up too me one day because she could not figure out what I was. I mean less than 5 feet. I could have tapped her on the nose with my bow.

     

    Myself I always much prefered the leafy cutout to the dyed burlap. Lighter, less smell, easy enough to use.

     

    I had a chunk long enough to cover my canoe, 5 feet wide way back when.

    Set decoys out, pull the canoe into  the cattails, lay camo on top, break a few cattails off and scatter on top to break up the outline. We slaughtered ducks and geese.

     

    In my experience, a ground blind would be fine if you had one spot you wanted to hunt often. Set it up well in advance, leave it there. Let them get used to it.

     

    Otherwise, go simple. The hard part with a bucket and a cornfield is learning to not move.

     

  • #46720
     kens 
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    ” Otherwise, go simple. The hard part with a bucket and a cornfield is learning to not move.”

    True, the hardest part of deer hunting is sitting still, even in a tree stand.  My problem is that I am figiddity, be it twiddling my thumbs, or folding my arms, or looking around too fast. I learned to better this by reading a small book, read one page, and scan the area, read another page and scan again. Smart phones are good too, turn off all the sounds, and play a game.

    I use the bucket method, put all my camo leafy cutout stuff in the bucket, walk that into the woods, and sit on the bucket. I carry a little kids leaf rake, bowie knife, ammo, thermacell, flashlight, et al., in the bucket. I often setup and look back to see how it blends in, I tried the camo leafy cutout, netting, burlap, it all still looks boxy, I mean looks like it was ‘put there’. We don’t have corn fields down here, no cash crops around me, just plain woods. Probably more Palmetto bushes and pine trees than anything. I am looking for better ideas to set up my ground blind, to make it look like ‘it belongs there’ instead of looking like it ‘was put there’

  • #46726
     Goodsteel 
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    I don’t worry about holding still in the woods. That’s a drag, and it just doesn’t work. in fact, I’m convinced it has the opposite effect. If you are relaxed and comfortable, then you can stay in the woods longer which greatly improves your chances.

    I dress comfortably, and bring the things that make me comfortable, and I make myself comfortable in the woods. When the deer show up, I still move and reposition myself for a shot etc etc, but I usually see the deer before they see me, and I only move when the deer’s eye goes behind a tree. This keeps me comfortable, and keeps the deer comfortable. Once I see my shot, I take it and all is well.

    Now for a ground blind, I’d bring the most comfortable chair you can possibly pack into the woods, and I would invest in this cool little pop up blind that I use occasionaly. It has about six telescoping rods with the blind material already attached and is about the size and weight of a compact umbrella. This material is light and has leaf-like perforations all over it. You just pull the rods out one by one and stab them in the ground witch creates a nice 6′ semi circle around you. If you need the full 360 degrees, use two of them. The height of the blind is adjustable depending simply on how far you extend the telescoping rods.

    A little foresight into an overhead umbrella is worth the effort. This keeps off rain, and keeps sticks from pelting you from above, keeps the sun off you, and just contributes greatly to your overall comfort which directly equates to your endurance. I usually back up to a good tree and screw a tree stand umbrella into it.

    My MO in the woods is to secure a barrier around my perimeter, secure a covering over my head, stay comfortable, move as much as possible without any deer present, control the bugs, and stay dry. As long as these things are taken care of, I can stay in the woods longer which means I will be more successful either in a tree or on the ground.

  • #46727
     kens 
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    My blind set up as of now, is kinda like your little pop up.

    I got the leafy material 54″ x 12′. I sew in a hem along the long side, and pulled a paracord thru it. I find 3 or 4 trees clustered together, and wrap this thing around. Yes, indeed only shoulder the gun when the deer gets behind something.

    True; comfort = endurance. But after about 3 0r 4 hours I’m ready for the porcelain throne, or lunch, or both. But I believe sitting still is very important. Perhaps deer are color blind, but they can certainly sense ‘movement’.

    Check out this video, it sort of demonstrates what I mean by movement.

    especially look at time stamps;

    1:08   1:36   2:16   3:27   4:52   5:59

    Notice how the guy was nearly invisible prior to the time stamp, then , aww crap !!! that’s so obvious !!!!

  • #46731
     Harter 
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    Here in the west ……
    I hunted big water ducks and geese . Tumble weeds were the answer , sometimes called Russian thisle . It was perfect on the rocky beaches even if you had to move the partially buried resident . Just stack a few up in a 1/2-3/4 moon or out on points a 400° snail .

    That approach of course is useless of course in a woods environment without such things . Bale blinds don’t work without bales in the field .

    If it is your hunting grounds , ie long term lease or owned property , I’d make a chicken wire blind or series of blinds and plant vines of some sort . Grapes , berries etc . Wrap the inside with an appropriate pattern in the spring or summer show up for the harvest and in a couple years you won’t need the wrap and you will have wild whatever more or less that is just part of the scenery .

    A guillie suit is probably as good as it gets on public land where you CAN’T adjust the growth to fit your needs . However that doesn’t keep one from adjusting under and over growth before the seasons ……. Taking the chance that there are 7 other people wanting to hunt your stand .

    Waterfowl hunters are often very creative in making up blinds with 360° vision . Layout blinds and sled blinds are typically light and easy to move . Covers come in everything from mossy oak and hard woods to snow break up and assorted grass and stubble . Most are roomy and low profile with back rests and and or 3/4 chase lounge seating . Haul it in wheelbarrow like or drag the sled move a few branches , vines or bushes and your on the hunt .

    Not having tried the above in the woods I could be 180% wrong but if it fools snows and all the other late season table birds it can’t be all wrong .

  • #46733
     kens 
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    I’m in south georgia. I hunt the military reservation. Sometimes I cannot get into the specific area that I prefer, so, I have to scout 2 or 3 areas, in order to likely to get 1. I got 2 ladder stands, and 2 ground blinds right now, waiting for the weather to cool a bit before I get heat stroke messing around with it all.

    I like your idea of planting vines around, maybe wild grapes. I been thinking of attempting to use wild tall grasses, tied together like a large broom, and stand them up.

    the wildlife dept. on post does a good job of planting deer food plots, but that also brings in hunting pressure, so I hunt away from the food plots, but maybe 1/4 or 1/2 mile near them. I been hunting mostly the same area for 15 years, it only open on weekends, and many other hunters think there is no deer in there, so it gets a bit lighter hunt pressure. Often I got 3,000 acres to myself. (except for that 1 food plot). There is deer in there, sometimes they are behind me, sometimes far away, sometimes I spook them, but they do exist. one time I got 3 in one sitting. and yet other hunters say there is no deer in there, they dont even try it. you just got to go in there and find them. the total of the reservation is something like 350,000 acres, and 260,000 available to hunt. Everybody wants to go to the west side, (40mile drive)  and yes, the soil is better, more food plots, more hardwoods, more of everything including hunting pressure.  I hunt 2 miles from the house, in the unwanted area, less pressure, and I’m in my stand 45minutes before you can drive to the other side.

  • #46736
     Rattlesnake Charlie 
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    I have one that looks like big round feed bale. Roomy, blocks the wind, even most of the rain. I don’t add anything else to conceal it. Just get it out there so they can get used to it.

    My other blind is a large wooden crate sitting on a trailer. Just some brown paint. No camo. Again, just get out early so they get used to it.

    Like Goodsteel said, you want to be comfortable so you spend as much time in the field as you can. I have a deluxe folding lawn chair in them along with a small propane heater. I prestock with snacks, paper towels, plastic bags, and water (which sometimes freezes). I try to get in the blind before it gets light, and settle down for a little relaxation with a cup of hot coffee. In the course of a long day I will get in a few naps too.

  • #46738
     kens 
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    So, the consensus is to get it out early, instead of better concealment?

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