This topic contains 6 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Goodsteel 3 years, 5 months ago.

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  • #27947
     Anonymous
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    How do I Glass bed a 22 rf ? Should i even try ?
    I have just purchases a copy of a Mauser KKW bolt action rifle a Norinco JW-25A — I have not even shot it yet
    It has two receiver screws and if i only tighten the back one (in the center of the action) barrel does not touch the front of the stock –if I tighten the front one it touches wood on one side of the stock and I was wondering what is the best way of glass bedding it
    if I do it would it be ok to Glass bed the first inch of the barrel in front of action (not a lot of support under action —-> mag fed)
    Thanks

  • #27973
     Goodsteel 
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    If you’re asking what’s the best way to glass bed it, that’s easy: Send it to me and it will be done perfectly.
    However, since that’s expensive and I’m about as fast as mud rolling uphill in January, I suggest you buy Devcon 10-110 and mix it by weight with your reloading scale.

    Buy these things:
    Brownells Acrarelease.
    Devcon 10-110 bedding compound.
    Small tub of plumbers putty.
    Roll of paper towels.
    Shop apron.
    big box of Q-tips.
    WD-40.
    Scotch brand electricians tape.

    Disassemble the rifle till all you have is a barrel and an action. Observe your action carefully and identify any places that would cause the bedding to form a mechanical lock on the receiver.
    Dam those places up with plumbers putty and use a new X-acto knife to skive it down pretty.
    Take a couple turns of tape around the barrel so it centers itself in the barrel channel.
    Do a dry build and make sure you can put things together perfectly.
    Spray the action with Acrarelease and take a couple extra passes over the sides of the action and barrel. Spray the hell out of the action screws and trigger guard.
    Mix your bedding mud and paste it all over your action where it will touch the stock.
    Paste it into your rifle stock as well.
    Once you’re sure you have everything prepped perfectly, set the action into the stock and press downward. If you did it right, the mud will squish out everywhere. go to wiping and swiping with q-tips, and paper towels. Use WD-40 to wipe off the residue from the stock by spraying it on the q-tips and towels.
    Put the screws through the stock, but do not tighten them at all. .
    Take a few turns around the stock and action with the tape both front and rear.
    Set it aside and let it set up till the next day.

    Crack the rifle out of the stock by cutting the tape, then using a large rubber hammer to smack the bottom of the barrel. Be careful here. You’re looking to run a jiggle through it only. You’re not looking to bend or harm your barrel in any way.
    Use a screw driver to loosen the screws, then whack the screw driver to crack the action loose over those screws, then remove them.
    Keep working it carefully till you extract the rifle from the bedding.
    Clean up the edges of your bedding with a file, then make it look professional by running over the border with a Sharpy marker.
    Should look great!

  • #27976
     Anonymous
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    I would love to be able to send you One or several of my rifles or even one of the Ideas I have in my head –xcb Rifle
    the lowest cost used Husky is the cost of a new low level Savage
    But i am in Canada and with customs its not gona happen

    Thanks for the advice / tips

  • #28000
     Goodsteel 
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    Yeah, that’s why I gave you detailed instructions. Bedding is a thinking man’s game. I just did a Ruger 77/357 yesterday and I miscalculated how much pressure the bedding would produce in a certain area. The bedding pushed my putty plug into a hole and made a mechanical lock. Took a bit of coaxing to get it out, and it tore a chunk out of the inside of the stock. No problem, I just put fresh bedding in that specific area, but since I already had 90% engagement with the receiver to the bedding that was in place, I screwed the action in tight the second time. Turned out great.
    Point is, I just can’t over think the process on a new gun design I’ve never bedded before, and I do this stuff all the time.
    Check out http://www.erniethegunsmith.com/
    to get a detailed tutorial on what bedding is and what it means to your rifle. He explains how to do it correctly, and why it is done that way.

  • #28072
     Fishman 
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    Great stuff Goodsteel. Thanks.

  • #28172
     ken campbell iowa 
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    ……..and in case you are wondering if it is worth it to bed a simple 22 squirrel rifle ::: very much so !…..even a simple pillar/bedding job can make a light truck gun into a 100 yard rabbit popper … after you bed it spring for a box of match ammo and i bet you will be impressed with the results .

    bull krieger barrels are nice but sometimes you can get lucky with a hiawatha pencil barrel … a lot of the fun is to see how those can shoot … with a good bedding job and good ammo .

    ken.

  • #28179
     Goodsteel 
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    A good bedding job and good ammo is necessary to see how any barrel will shoot. Even a Krieger.
    There’s no secrets here. It’s a lead hose. Adjust the nozzle to get a smaller stream………

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