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    • #29908
      Goodsteel
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      I once ate an Armadillo.

      It was late at night and I heard a rustling in the bushes at deer camp sounded big enough to be a bear. I got the light and found it was a big ol possum on the half shell. I popped it with the 22 magnum, skinned it out (or shelled it as the case may be) and put the meat on ice over night.
      The next morning after hunting, I fried him up in the skillet using baked bean juice as a gravy. I didn’t know what to expect, but I actually enjoyed it quite a bit. It tasted like pork and was quite delicious.

      Have you ever taken a bite of something a little off the beaten path? What’s your story?

    • #29918
      WCM
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      My son likes Armadillo. He told me he was camping out one night and killed an Armadillo .Threw it in the camp fire and when the shell popped open he tired eating some of the meat and liked it.
      I think there was alcohol involved in the process.

      He fried some up in a skillet one night and tried his best to get me to try it.
      I declined the offer.

      I have had alligator meat that was good.
      like chicken nuggets.

      My favorite wild game meat is squirrel.
      I par boil them or put them in a slow cooker overnight.
      They can be tough if you don’t cook them slow.

    • #29920
      Goodsteel
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      I purely love the flavor of fried squirrel, but the toughness almost negates the flavor.

    • #29926
      timspawn
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      Gator is pretty common around here, as a matter of fact I was at Publix (super market) yesterday and saw gator in the frozen seafood section. It was actually wild caught and not farm raised. I have cleaned and eaten stingray. Small ones about the size of a salad bowl, cut off the wings and skin them like a catfish. Cut them in strips and fry like chicken fingers.

    • #29927
      Goodsteel
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      timspawn;n9509 wrote: Gator is pretty common around here, as a matter of fact I was at Publix (super market) yesterday and saw gator in the frozen seafood section. It was actually wild caught and not farm raised. I have cleaned and eaten stingray. Small ones about the size of a salad bowl, cut off the wings and skin them like a catfish. Cut them in strips and fry like chicken fingers.

      Yeah? How is it on s scale of 1-10?

      Seafood is something I only really get when I travel. It’s a bit pricy and hard to get here in the Arkansas backwoods.

      When Im out of state, I usually take the opportunity to destroy oysters by the dozens and man oh man dungenous crab and tuna!
      yep, I eat it up. Try to get in 5 years worth when I get the chance. LOL!

    • #29933
      farmerjim
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      Nutria is excellent, but be sure to remove all the scent glands. It tastes just like chicken.

    • #29934
      timspawn
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      They are both good depending on the prep and size of the critter. Gator can be tough but small ones or tenderized pieces are excellent. Stingrays pee through their skin so it must be removed, not that you’d eat it anyway because of how tough it is. The old saying is that if your scallops or perfectly round, you are eating stingray.

    • #29935
      Goodsteel
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      farmerjim;n9516 wrote: Nutria is excellent, but be sure to remove all the scent glands. It tastes just like chicken.

      I suppose it’s irrational, but I’d have to be REALLY hungry to eat something that looks like a giant rat. I’ve never had possum or coon either (same reason).
      I’ll keep it in mind though and try to work myself up to it. Those suckers are so pervasive, it’s interesting to note them as a viable food source!

    • #29936
      Reg
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      Carp, fillet and pressure can. Better than that store bought tuna.

    • #29938
      Harter
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      I’d rather not divulge the lean times chow call but I’ve eaten a lot of jack rabbits and Tule roots . . Bad times but it filled the bellies .

      More recently about as far off the path as I’ve strayed lately is radiator killed dove and quail .

    • #29941
      Doc Highwall
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      Harter;n9521 wrote: I’d rather not divulge the lean times chow call but I’ve eaten a lot of jack rabbits and Tule roots . . Bad times but it filled the bellies .

      More recently about as far off the path as I’ve strayed lately is radiator killed dove and quail .

      So you are saying it was………..”fresh off the grill”

    • #29942
      Harter
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      Occasionally. No sense wasting those yummy little buzz balls .

    • #29947
      JPHolla
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      Groundhog tastes like rabbit. Asian carp taste better than any other fish that live here. Funny you should mention armadillos…due to Al Gore’s global warming, they have been moving here over the past few years. This summer, I have seen two on the road near where I live. I’ve been hoping to find one alive to kill to eat.

    • #29950
      Harter
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      Just as a foot note and I don’t know that it is prevalent, but armadillos can carry and transmit to people leprosy and TB . So if it is missing parts you didn’t shoot off don’t mess with it walk away if it has a cough.

    • #29955
      Sgt. Mike
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      don’t like groundhogs, then again last I ate might not have been prepped good too.
      rabbit on the other hand yeah.

      But hard times yeah not much gets culled from the table, .
      rats, grubs, snakes, worms yeah but like I said bad hard times warrant some crafty cooking skills to make tasty.

    • #29966
      Butch Wax
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      I wouldn’t eat a ‘diller for nuthin’. I’ve been blastin’ those invading SOB’s for 60 years. Hate ’em with a passion! Here in Texas they’re not welcome ever since they crossed the Rio Grand back in the 20’s on their way north.

      Now I have eaten boiled pup when on the reservation in S. Dakota at my great aunt’s. Dog was thought a real treat with traditional Lakota. My old aunt wanted to give me a real traditional meal before I went off to war (Vietnam). It wasn’t half bad really, but I felt real bad for the little puppy she did in.

    • #29972
      oldblinddog
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      Try this book. In it you will find my grandmother’s recipe for fried squirrel. https://www.amazon.com/Squirrel-Dog-Basics-Hunting-Squirrels/dp/0967170001

    • #29973
      oldblinddog
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      I have had a raccoon or two. 1. After you kill it, leave it in the woods. 2. If you forget to leave it in the woods, when you skin it out, remove all musk glands. These can number in the dozens so hack away and make sure you get all of them.

    • #29974
      oldblinddog
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    • #29975
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      Back about 1980, I wound up with one mamma coon and about 5 of her offspring. I butchered them and put them into a BBQ marinade. Invited everyone in the Jedediah Smith Muzzleloading Club the next day. That night, I stood out in a snowstorm in my snowmobile suit grilling racoon. About 20 people showed up. Mostly the older ones, and some parents of my age group. They had eaten racoon during the depression and dirt storm days. There were no leftovers.

    • #29977
      lar45
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      Beaver is where it’s at!!
      No seriously the critters that build dams. Gut, dress and clean like any other critter. Cut it up like a chicken and fry it like a pork chop. I dip the cut up pieces in egg and milk wash, then into crushed up Club Crackers. Next it goes into an Electric fry pan with oil in it. Season with Lawry’s Season Salt. Fry until it’s golden brown with the lid on, then flip and repeat.
      Oh my goodness is it good stuff. It’s very rich, but tender and flavorful. I had heard of the old trappers eating the tail. I skinned and cooked it the same, but it was mostly a big lump of fat. So I don’t recommend the tail.

      I’ve tried Porkupine but it really wasn’t very good. I made jerky out of one and it turned out to be edible. Skinning it was interesting…
      Rock Chuck was kind of tough and greasy, but it filled bellies when I ended up on a camping trip with a bunch of idiots that didn’t pack any food.

    • #29980
      Goodsteel
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      Glenn, beaver is duly noted!
      I never would have guessed, but that’s not the sort of critter I would shy away from either.
      Next time I see one of them I’ll let you know the skillet is heating up.

    • #29985
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      I’ve cooked up several dozen beaver in my days after getting out of the navy and going to college on the GI Bill. The yearlings are OK to roast with vegetables. The older ones, they went into the grinder to become chili. The sinew between muscle groups will bring a grinder to a halt. You need to back it out and remove that indestructible stuff. Every January our ML club had a chili night and we watched movies instead of freezing at the range. I seldom had any chili to take home.

    • #32383
      LenH
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      Glenn beat me to it, but my uncle had a friend that was a trapper and he fixed stuff just to get a reaction out of his citified nephews.
      I think he was a bit disappointed when we chowed down that baked critter. It was quite tasty.

    • #32384
      kens
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      My favorite cut of deer is becoming the neck. I cut the meat between each vertebrae as to have bone in steaks, crock pot till it falls off the bone, salt & pepper it.
      I try to pick it off the bone to make chili but it seldom gets as far as chili before it is all gone.

      I eat Bonita too. Many fishermen snub bonita but I find it as good as any other tuna provided:
      you only use the clear meat high on the back, and cook it that same day as the catch.
      It also makes a fine Hawaiian Poke’

    • #32388
      jwt
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      I’ve had all of the usual stuff – Deer (Whitetail and Mule), Elk, Moose, Bison. I have also had the pleasure of several African antelope at a great restaurant in Shreveport Louisiana call the Noble Savage. Blackened gator is good as are crawfish and crab. Squirrel is excellent when prepared Maltese rabbit style (sort of a cacciatore). Rabbit is good. Ostrich and Emu are excellent. I once had barbecued rattlesnake when I was a boy scout.

      Last night I made Ostrich steaks with baked potatoes and brussel sprouts for the family. Awesome.

    • #32390
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      God has provided us with a varied menu from which to harvest. We are lucky. I am grateful.

    • #32395
      kens
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      Anybody had eel adobo?

    • #32397
      Menner
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      Can’t believe nobody has said anything about Snapping Turtle My Great Grand mother and Grand Mother would make a Turtle pot pie that we would fight over. Mom would have none of it and it just died off My wife will eat Deer, Quail, Ducks, Snow goose but she will have nothing to do with Snapping Turtle LOL.
      Squid (calamari) sure but just can not bring myself to eat one of those Slimy Bastards (eel that is) we use them to catch Rock Fish around here, Then we eat the fish
      Tony

    • #32402
      Waksupi
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      Between wild game feeds, and being a poor trapper years ago, I’ve ate darn near everything, including skunk.

    • #32407
      JPHolla
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      Softshell turtle is good, too. And much easier to dress.

      I could add gar is delicious. As is all of the asian carp.

    • #32409
      kens
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      I mean salt water eel, not the slimy fresh water things.
      Moray eel (the ones that bite you) are boney but good.

    • #32410
      Menner
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      I would try that
      Tony

    • #32412
      GhostHawk
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      Menner we must be brothers (from different mothers) It seems to me we think a lot a like.

      I will never forget the eduation I got cleaning my first big snapping turtle. Nor will I forget the wonderful soup mom made with it. Clear, delecate flavor, yummy.

      I have eaten some off the wall stuff. But one of my best was 3 woodcock. Was living in Warroad Mn at the time, we were 45 miles south of there, Go look on the map, there is NOTHING there for a 100 miles in 3 directions. Muskeg swamp, poplar tree’s and mosquitos. 3 guys in a ranger pickup drinking beer and shooting .22lr. A recipe for disaster in and of itself.

      The truck got stuck. Truck owner said he had an uncle that would help, 18 miles away, he started walking. The mosquito’s were terribad. The third guy he holed up in the truck and sparyed so much repellant that you could not see out the windows, much less breath that murk. So I filled an empty beer bottle with melted ice water from the cooler, grabbed my ruger 10/22 and went looking for a good camp.

      As the sun went down I was able to shoot and find 3 woodcock as they came in to look for worms, drink, etc. I had a nice little fire with a smudge keeping the mosquito’s at bay.
      And I proceeded to spit roast those woodcock. No salt, no spices, nothing but hunger and dark and burning will to survive.

      They showed up at 10 am the next morning, pulled the truck out. Me I was fat and sassy in my little camp. The kid in the truck they had to take to the hospital.

      Not good to breath that much of that repellent.

      I gave the truck owner credit, he walked hard and kept his bearings.

    • #32415
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      Good story! And, you gave credit where deserved. Thanks you. Make sure your grandchildren hear this adventure.

    • #32416
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      Good story! And, you gave credit where deserved. Thanks you. Make sure your grandchildren hear this adventure.

    • #32421
      kens
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      I worked 3 years in the Philippines back in the day. Some of the things I saw cooked was unreal. Some I tried, and a few I had to leave alone.

    • #32422
      Menner
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      GhostHawk
      I can remember going out in the boat setting hooks as a young lad then going back and pulling lines man were those turtles pissed.
      Boat was an old plywood flat bottom my Dad and Uncle built, had a box in the center to put the turtles in my job was to open and close the lid when Dad pulled them out of the water. I remember Dad pulling one up that would not fit in the box one of the first times I had heard him cuss, something like ” What the Hell are we gonna do with This SOB”
      If I remember He kept the line tight while I rowed/Paddled us back to the truck. ( I got laughing just typing that and remembering ) we would take them home and get the hooks out Dad and my uncle had made a dehooker out of some steel tubing split down its length (to lay the line in) with a ” V ” notch cut opposite the split on one end to get a hold of the hook. then they would take most of them to sell and keep a few to eat ( you could not sell them with a hook in it )
      Before I got old enough that I could catch them on my own they change the laws so that you could no longer use hooks you had to use traps that was the end of that, Dad and my Uncles lost interest and just quit fishing for them in numbers for sale they would just catch a few for the table after that.
      Have not had a Snapping Turtle in Years might, have to remedy that in the spring. Have to get Dad to show me how to clean one again just like when I was a kid LOL
      Might make both of us happy LOL
      Tony

      P.S. only have ever ate one Woodcock we were quail hunting when one flushed from under me thought it was a Quail and shot it. I remember that I ate it just could not tell you much more than that, I was maybe 12 Dad had to tell me what it was they are not plentiful around here at all

    • #32433
      GhostHawk
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      Menner I live on the Red River of the North which runs between Minnesota and North Dakota. The valley the river runs in is 150 to 200 feet of loon shit clay. Where the river keeps it wet if you try to step in it you may go to your ankle, or to your hip. No way of knowing. So I had taken an old busted paint roller, added handle, straightened it, and turned it into a gaff of sorts for a fish landing aid. So you did not have to get so close to the edge.

      We never set out to catch that turtle, rather the turtle was eating our bait.

      Normal process was to find a good place on the bank in the shade, start a small smudge fire to discourage the mosquito’s.
      Now my fishing partner he was old school, he had these big rods, big red open faced reels probably bought back in the 50’s for fishing Musky.

      Well he went to throw his line out, baited hook caught a shrub leaf, rod jerked out of his hands, leaf ripped off and the whole works dropped into the river with some blue language.

      Well I am as close to the edge as I feel like I can get when I see this huge old snapper eating on 2 goldyes and a sucker we had on the stringer as bait. Well I eased down a little closer slipped my gaff under him and when he stuck his head out for another bit lifted the hook up and snagged him by the left rear leg.

      I yelled, my partner came over, Mr turtle is in 4 wheel drive trying to get away, I have a death grip on the gaff, and my thin rubber mud boots are slipping in the mud. When up comes one end of the lost rod and reel.

      Rod was saved, eventually I was able to gain higher and dryer ground, and the turtle came ashore.

      He stopped, sized up the situation and decided his best plan to get loose was to get aholt of one of my toes.

      We danced, and danced. Eventually my partner yelled something to the effect of ” You going to keep dancing with that turtle or fish?”

      I remembered I had a ruger 10/22 in the truck behind the seat. Yeah, thats the ticket and I flipped him over and off we went.

      Standing on the shell, put 3 in the head when it finally poked out. I won’t say it killed him. It slowed him down a bunch.

    • #32436
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      Another great story that is well written. Thanks for it. It had me laughing. I too have danced with snappers.

    • #32442
      Menner
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      GhostHawk I was laughing out loud wifey looking at me
      Great stories. We are truly the product of our experiences.
      Tony

    • #32476
      Goodsteel
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      Wow what a story!!!!

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