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    • #29794
      Goodsteel
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      This rifle is for JRR. He contacted quite some time ago and described his desire for a superbly accurate target rifle in 6.5X55 Swed.
      The specs:
      Action: Turkish 98.
      Barrel: Krieger Bull
      Caliber: 6.5X55
      Wieght: 17lb
      Length: 48″
      Stock: Boyds laminate
      Trigger: Jard
      Scope: SWFA

      JRR told me he wanted it reblued, and built for precision.

      At first I was tentatively skeptical having had some experience with various Turkish Mausers, but once I got my hands on the one he chose to invest a build in, I was quite impressed. It was tighter and more concentrically fabricated than most Remington 700s that have come through the shop. It hardly needed blueprinting at all!
      I called him back then and told him this was a very exceptional action and should produce a rifle of superb accuracy if the barrel plays nice.

      Well, as I built this rifle I knew the potential that I could eke out of it if I played my cards right, so I gave extra attention to detail through the whole build process. I spent 7 hours alone, just polishing the action by hand and resculpting the trigger guard before bluing it.
      The rail was attached and bedded to the action with great attention given to keeping it parallel to the center line of the barrel
      The trigger was hung with extreme care to get it exactly right.
      The barrel channel was inlet with perfect clearance.
      The bedding was executed with great care to fill every void and get complete purchase of every bit of the bottom metal and the receiver.
      The large barrel made the rifle imbalanced, so lead weights were cast and carefully installed in the butt of the stock to plant the toe and give the rifle a good rudder to steer with.
      An enormous amount of work and fussing went into this.
      Before I show the final result, allow me to show some pictures of the build as it progressed.

    • #29795
      Goodsteel
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      So lets see what all this work and effort and months of fussing gets us!
      Observe:

      Your’s truly
      Tim Malcolm

    • #29796
      Anonymous
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      Nice Work Impressive 🙂

    • #29797
      bjornb
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      As the owner of multiple MBT rifles, I can only say “lucky dude”, you’re getting a rifle you’ll be taking to the range more than any other. I’m currently in “MBT withdrawal” during Tim’s move; a Rem 700 in .222 Remington is up next when the shop gets back up and running.
      Outstanding rifle Tim!

    • #29800
      timspawn
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      I own one of Tim’s custom rifles and he is working on two other rifles for me right now. His attention to detail is amazing.

    • #29803
      DeadWoodDan
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      I kind of feel like the guy who missed the ship…..hope to join the “club” some day. Nice work Tim!

    • #29804
      Larry Gibson
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      • Gold

      Excellent work, awesome rifle, one complaint……..what the hell is the load Tim!

      Larry Gibson

    • #29805
      Goodsteel
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      59.5 grains of IMR Pixie Dust with a 33 grain bullet.

      Har! (a little amusement for Sarge’s benefit).

      The load was 36.5gr of IMR 4895 (trickled with the Chargemaster) over a 140 grain bullet supplied by JRR.
      Primer was CCI 200. Brass was Lapua, FL sized, and primed.
      The bullets were seated to Hornady AOL gauge measurement with a Forester BR seating die.
      I loaded 15 shots as per my usual test procedure.

      To prep the new barrel for this exercise, I patched it thoroughly with about 60 patches alternating between Ed’s red and two dry patches (not a single bullet had gone down the barrel at this point).
      One single shot was fired and the cleaning process was repeated.
      Three shots were fired to zero the scope.
      The remaining 12 are in the group you see up yonder.

      The two that are out of the group were random. If not for those two fliers, the group would be .473 for 10 shots, but I always count my fliers.

    • #29806
      bjornb
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      I wish for “fliers” like those every time I go to the range!!

    • #29808
      JRR
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      Just got home, let the dog out then turned on the computer. I’m a VERY HAPPY CAMPER! This is my first venture into the world of long distance shooting. Every other center fire arm I own is fired using cast. .223, 8mm Mauser, 9mm, 38/357, 40S&W, 45ACP and 45 Colt. 200 yards has been my limit with the 223 and 8mm.

      This is very exciting. Seeing the transformation of this 1941 Ankara Mauser, bought at Big 5 for $79.00 in 2001 is amazing. If this is the kind of group with an arbitrary load I can only imagine what this rifle will do with carefully worked up precision hand loading.

      Thanks Tim for your talent.

      Jeff

    • #29809
      Menner
      Participant
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      Well Done, Beautiful Rifle
      Tony

    • #29811
      WCM
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      • Overall: 398

      Excellent work.
      I want a rifle with a Krieger barrel for long range shooting.
      Probably a .260 Rem

      I like the 6.5 X 47 Lapua , but the brass is a unique item and very expensive.

    • #29812
      goody
      Participant
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      • Posts: 18
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      Very nice indeed. I can appreciate the new expensive actions for what they are but seeing an old ww2 army gun get turned around with love and care is the best in my book!!

    • #29815
      Larry Gibson
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      • Gold

      Yeah, those “flyers” really screwed the pooch on that rifle. Better luck next time…….:rolleyes:

      Larry Gibson

    • #29817
      Goodsteel
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      One can only hope………

    • #29830
      Sgt. Mike
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      Durn it thought I taught you better Tim Fliers …… MY LORD …. LMAO… use the fly swatter next time.

      Ok now for serious
      Tim, JRR excellent Project looks outstanding, the 6.5×55 is a good choice.
      As Bjorn said JRR is a “lucky dude” to get this one done.

    • #29836
      JRR
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      I am a lucky dude. Can’t wait to welcome her back to Santa Rosa.
      Jeff

    • #29864
      Bodean98
      Participant
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      Well done Goodsteel!
      The accuracy is most impressive. What caught my eye, though, was the finish you put on the Turk receiver and bottom metal! I have worked on enough old Mausers ( I am just a hobbyist) to know the hours of hand polishing required to make them presentable enough to take out in public :eek:. Making one shoot to that level of accuracy can be a challenge unto itself.
      JRR is indeed one blessed individual!

      BTW– really enjoyed the pics!

    • #29872
      Goodsteel
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      It’s taken quite a few builds to condense my system down to those operations that really make a difference (precision in the wrong place is nothin but a placebo). I suppose I learned the most about this with the original XCB rifles. Those rifles were each required to demonstrate 1/2MOA before leaving the shop. Took months of noodling before I figured out what each one needed with bedding and barrel support, lapping etc etc etc. the good news is there was a Remington, a Savage, three different Mausers, and a Winchester I built that was not an XCB, but did demonstrate that level of accuracy. Between all those, I pretty much figured out what each needs to make it play.

      The big deal with building a precision Mauser is bedding the magazine box. It’s a solid milled piece of metal, and has so much purchase on the reciever, it simply must be treated as PART of the reciever, and a very flimsy part at that. Total bedding is required to make the rifle work like this.
      Also, JRR didn’t deviate from my recommendations one iota. He provided the right parts to make an accurate rifle, not the least of which is a Krieger barrel which is all I recommend.
      Many people go looking online and find a blog or something that claims to be the authority on what barrels the top shooters are using etc etc etc and they get an idea in their mind about who’s barrel is best. Yeah the rifles shoot well when I’m done with them, but only Krieger gives me this level of precision with almost borring regularity. You can work the loads into a one hole group with any of them but Krieger pretty much performs like this every time, and many of my clients can attest to that.
      If you want your rifle to shoot like gangbusters, the only opinion you should listen to is that of the smith building your rifle (whoever that is).

    • #29877
      JRR
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      The difference between average and excellent was approx. $100 on barrels (a no brainer), Tim’s advice. On scope base and rings, I wanted the best. Badger does not make a base for the 98 mauser. I checked and researched the web and decided on Ken Farrell due to precision design and Tim’s advice to go steel on steel (steel is real). Rings are the same, a set, machined at the same time from the same piece of metal. Scope choice was difficult. I wanted excellence, but did not have the bucks for it. Went with the gamble and bought the SWFA 20 power fixed. It looks like I lucked out. On triggers, I diverted from the norm (Timney) and chose Jard (14oz.) I’ve used the Timney on other rifles and wanted to try something else just for kicks. This is a 1941 made action (old) and I wanted to get a new firing pin and spring. I went for the gusto and chose the Tubbs lightweight pin and spring for quicker lock time. On stocks, I went for cheap but good. A Boyds laminate was chosen due to the economics/function ratio.

      Thank you Tim for putting up with my monthly/weekly/daily check in calls and texts. I hope that I was not too big a pita. Jeff

    • #29881
      Goodsteel
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      JRR;n9438 wrote:
      Thank you Tim for putting up with my monthly/weekly/daily check in calls and texts. I hope that I was not too big a pita. Jeff

      Jeff, that is how I build! I would say your rifle was about as average a metric of what it’s like to have a rifle built here as any. I’m often late, but I hardly ever miss, and the end product is usually an enjoyable rifle that you can’t get just anywhere.
      On the contrary, thank YOU for having the patience to let me study this build and bring it about in a thoughtful way, and for providing me superb parts and never once tying my hands from making it all it could be, or rushing me to finish it sooner than it should have been. We can haggle till the cows come home about cosmetics, but this rifle has it where it counts and I’m almost sinfully proud of it.
      It’s like a child about to head off for collage.

    • #29888
      bjornb
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      Good to hear that others have bought the SWFA scope and lucked out. I’ve got a new one that also looks like the real deal.

    • #29890
      Goodsteel
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      The SWFA is on my top ten list for a reason.

    • #30133
      Anonymous
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      ;)I don’t know………………………..from the pics it looks like somebody flunked handwashing 101, tsk, tsk, tsk. Pretty good looking shooter though.

    • #30136
      Goodsteel
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      claude;n9792 wrote: ;)I don’t know………………………..from the pics it looks like somebody flunked handwashing 101, tsk, tsk, tsk. Pretty good looking shooter though.

      Dirty, cracked hands make beautiful rifles my friend.
      Funny, at the old sight folks made fun of my hands being too clean.
      Can’t win for losin.
      LOL!

    • #30184
      ZmanWakeForest
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      Absolutely gorgeous piece! Well done!

    • #31500
      Chris C
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      I’ve got a beautiful old “Swede” that I’m mighty proud of. It was pieced together by my cousin, who is a gunsmith………….. all the serial numbers don’t match, but it was my first rifle and I love it. Nicest thing about it is when it was returned to the armory for refurbishing before retirement, it received an brand new barrel which is immaculate. Not even going to ask, but I know sending it to Tim would cost more than I could ever afford. Tim does beautiful work and I could be so lucky as to have a rifle built or rebuilt by him. For now, I’ll just slobber over pics of his work. Envy is a terrible thing! :p

    • #31621
      dragon813gt
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      Quite impressive. The balance pictures are what always impress me. I have a Rem 700 in 30/06 that in pretty rough shape. Well not really but it would make a good starting point for a custom build 😀

    • #31880
      kens
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      Hi,
      May I ask please.
      I notice you have a Jard trigger there. What is the pros & cons of a old school double set trigger ?
      There are triggers from Timney, Jewel, Bold, Jard; how do they stack up against double set??

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