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    • #22668
      Goodsteel
      Keymaster
      • Gold
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      Back in the spring, a friend approached me about restoring his Dan Wesson 357 Magnum which through no fault of his own, had become horribly damaged by rust. I accepted the challenge, but my friend also insisted that I post this restoration on the forum with whatever I am able to accomplish, and he also insisted on my posting “before” pictures, which I agreed to do.

      So without further ado, here is the pictures of what I was presented with some months ago:

      As you can see, the damage is extensive, and the rust had set in deep.
      I began this project by soaking the pistol in Kroil, and I kept it freshened over the months that it waited its turn for my attention. This allowed me to easily crack all the screws and the sideplate loose when the time came to carefully disassemble it.
      Once disassembly was complete, I began as I normally do, with stones and files, gently working the offending areas down to a common plane, and doing my best not to wipe out lettering and features, keeping the sharp things sharp, and the smooth things smooth. I try very hard to strike a compromise in all that I do when refinishing a firearm. My point of view is “I’m not supposed to be here, and what I am doing should be done with as much apology and respect as possible for the original maker of this gun.” After all: damage to a firearm is an injury. A smith who damages it further in an attempt to correct the damage that was already done, is just an insult.

      Once all the filing and stoning is complete, I work through progressively finer grits of abrasive paper with custom backers to bring the finish back up to par and to erase all evidence of my work. The final touch is applied with a buff using jewelers rough with extreme trepidation and care. Buffing is an extremely aggressive process, but I perform it with as much care and skill as I can muster. I never work tired, and I never allow myself to go too far, especially around the lettering.

      Once the buffing is taken care of, the parts are carefully cleaned and then dipped in a boiling bath of soapy water followed by a rinse in clean boiling water, followed by the bath in the hot tank, which I take great care to properly manage the temperature and saturation of.

      The results, I dare say, speak for themselves:

      And finally………………………(and the reason I reposted this thread)
      Here’s one final shot of the pistol back in the case with the rest of it’s barrels!

      I just love an adventure with a happy ending.

    • #22682
      timspawn
      Participant
      • Silver
      • ★★
      • Posts: 29
      • Comments: 137
      • Overall: 166

      Amazing work as usual Tim.

    • #22800
      Ole Jack
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 0
      • Comments: 3
      • Overall: 3

      Wow, I thought for sure that ole hoss was down for the count. You really brought it back to life. Great job!
      Ole Jack

    • #22822
      Anonymous
      Inactive
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 0
      • Comments: 15
      • Overall: 15

      I have always wanted a Dan Wesson. Used to fondle them when Fleet Farm in Plymouth Wisconsin carried them back when they were a brand new idea. The one you brought back to life looks as good as any of them that I remember in the showcase, nice work!!

    • #22880
      longshot1154
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 0
      • Comments: 1
      • Overall: 1

      Very nice work I’ve been wanting a Dan Wesson for many years and finally heard of a friend getting rid of one. Traded a SW MP 45 for it and I know I got the better part of the trade. You do very nice work.

    • #22915
      Anonymous
      Inactive
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 0
      • Comments: 11
      • Overall: 11

      Great work!! Great pistol. It deserves no less.

    • #22926
      Wheel Gun
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 2
      • Comments: 43
      • Overall: 45

      What a Professional job. You are a true craftsman! Of course I’m especially partial for those beautiful wheel guns.
      WG

    • #22995
      Doc44
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 1
      • Comments: 36
      • Overall: 37

      I am the owner of this now wonderfully restored firearm. I was very nearly physically ill when I had first recovered it from an individual I had lent it to during her bad divorce. I packed it away, not being able to even look at it. After seeing some of Goodsteels fine work I asked for his help. The result is far better than I could have even dreamed. My heartfelt thanks for this restoration. He currently has a blued Python that wont be such a chore if he can only find a replacement hammer.

    • #23014
      Goodsteel
      Keymaster
      • Gold
      • ★★★
      • Posts: 208
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      • Overall: 2660

      Doc44;n910 wrote: He currently has a blued Python that wont be such a chore if he can only find a replacement hammer.

      Yeah, about that. I think I’m going to have to pull a rabbit out of the hat on that one. I have a plan though.

    • #23246
      Menner
      Participant
      • Silver
      • ★★
      • Posts: 4
      • Comments: 120
      • Overall: 124

      Well done Tim. When a Man cares about his work in comes through in the final result. again Well Done
      Tony

    • #23280
      Harter
      Participant
      • Gold
      • ★★★
      • Posts: 76
      • Comments: 807
      • Overall: 883

      Another amazing restorection. You leave me in awe every time.

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