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    • #26503
      Dick
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      My brother and I are about to have a couple hundred acres logged…well, as soon as it dries up some. We went through and marked all the black walnut trees that we want taken down. Ok, I marked the walnuts, lol.

      What cuts should I look at for stocks, grips, furniture, etc? The majority of these trees are over 70 years old and my notes say there will be over 40 of them cut down. I’ve talked to a mill and they can do what needs to be done, but I’m just not sure what cuts to get to get the most bang for the buck. Any suggestions?

    • #26512
      Goodsteel
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      You need to get a quick education on how to season wood. Talk to people that have done it successfully and do it right. It will totally pay you back in the long run.
      Don’t worry with the crotch wood, or those nasty burled up stumps. Just send those twisty pieces over to me for disposal. They may not ever make it into the fireplace, but they’ll do a dandy job of warming my heart. LOL!

    • #26513
      Dick
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      I’ve been researching it and have been talking with the mill. Looks like my biggest issue is going to be storage. My brother is an avid wood worker and wants to make his own furniture as a retirement gig. I just want some to try my hand at stock and grip making. Take a trip down to Georgia and see what we got coming down, lol. Old oaks, maples, bunch of old pine, etc.

    • #26514
      Screwbolts
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      Tim, I don’t know if I have ever read truer, or more heart felt words than you wrote above. That is good advice, it brought a huge smile to my face.

      I like the way you Think!

      Ken

    • #26516
      Harter
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      I’ve been thinking along similar lines . I have a huge building into which a rather large amount of edge spaced stacked 4x8x 48 could be stacked in a 21% annual average atmosphere placed in April it would be nearly natural dry through by October and certainly so by the next May.

      Man I’m going to miss cut split wood ready for the fire in 8 weeks …..

    • #26517
      Dick
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      lol. I miss never having to oil metal parts to prevent rust.

      I’m thinking a large chicken coop with big fans should be adequate…I hope. Air flow and protection from the elements.

    • #26518
      Reg
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      I use the mow in our old barn for storing wood. When cutting I try to save as much of the crotch wood and stump wood as possible and lately even the plain wood running through the trunk and bigger limbs.
      Once upon a time we could buy a nice piece of plain trunk wood, cured, for about 5.00, no more, it all is gold it seems !!!

    • #26533
      Chris C
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      I’m a custom furniture maker. ( http://www.chrischristenberry.com ) So I’ve done a fair amount of cutting, stacking, sticking and drying in my day. Wood has to be dried flat, spaced apart by “stickers” (usually 1″ thick square sticks) to allow air to move freely between the boards. Once you get your stack built, put really heavy weights on top of the stack. (I used unopened bags of Sacrete.) You don’t want that wood to move or warp in any direction. The only good wood is air dried wood……….not just my opinion, but most woodworkers. The only problem is it takes a year per inch of thickness………….or more. The most beautiful burled walnut I ever worked with had been cut and stickered and stacked in a barn for 80 years!!!!! I treated that wood like gold and used it until I got down to the point of using it as stringing for inlays. You can’t push wood to dry………..just let it do it’s thing. The only “high-tech” trick allowed is keeping fans pointed at the stack to keep the air moving. If you stack outdoors, make sure you have it covered well to protect it from rain, sun and weather. Indoors, of course, that’s not a problem. The longer you wait the greater the reward. I’ve got a brass frame for an old 3 Screw Blackhawk I’d sure like to find some good wood for, but it’s hard to find really fancy wood. If you are lucky enough to get hold of some crotch wood or burls, hoard it like crazy.

      Edit: One thing I should add is be sure to coat the end of each end of each board with beeswax, latex paint or any other liquid moisture barrier. That cuts down on the splitting.

    • #26856
      Paul G
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      Chris, I checked out your gallery, you got skills.

    • #26865
      seaboltm
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      skills indeed . . . . When I built my house I did not want to use the relatively thin oak planks commonly available for stair steps. So, I bought a huge oak tree and had it cut into planks at a lumber mill. As Chris C described, I then stacked it and let it dry for two years. The planks were cut about 2 inches thick. I bought a large planer and went to work on the dried lumber. The results were amazing and I had 1.5 inch thick stair steps. I wish I could take pictures, but I sold that house about 8 years ago.

    • #26869
      Str8shot426
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      Ends of the boards need to be sealed for proper drying. The boards will crack if they dry too fast. It’s not firewood, needs to dry through the faces not the ends.

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