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    • #32550
      lar45
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      A friends son came over with some empty 9mm brass and a bucket of wheel weights. I”m using Doc44’s Lee 120gn TC mold and have a bunch of bullets cast..
      What is a good powder that will burn clean with the 120 Lee?
      Thanks

    • #32553
      Anonymous
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      Most folks around here use Bullseye. I have used it but I have found ETR7 or Vectan AS burn cleaner and perform about the same as
      Bullseye.

    • #32556
      GhostHawk
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      I guess my name should be “RedDotFan” as it is mostly what I use. I have tried titewad in .45acp with good results. But for my use 3 to 4.5 grains of Red Dot works fine in 9mm.

    • #32560
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      What GhostHawk said. That’s my favorite load with that very bullet.

    • #32564
      sundog
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      I like Red Dot. A lot. It does not meter well in small quantities. Any suggestions?

    • #32565
      uber7mm
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      The quickest fix would be to make yourself a scoop from a spent case.

      If money is no object, then I’d go with the Redding Powder Measure and the #3BR micrometer:

      http://www.midwayusa.com/product/610710/redding-match-grade-3br-powder-measure-with-handgun-metering-chamber

      http://www.midwayusa.com/product/767610/redding-match-grade-3br-powder-measure-handgun-metering-chamber

    • #32566
      kens
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      I have made many powder scoops from spent cases and a piece of coat hanger wire soldered around the rim for a handle.
      you can get quite accurate after you throw a few charges on the scale and get a rythem going.
      Then again, you can get the set of dippers from Lee, that work good too.

    • #32578
      GhostHawk
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      I have an older RCBS powder measure set at 4.6 grains, it does not change often.

      If I need to do something else I make a dipper, test it, refine it with case chamfer tool, or discs of paper/foam glued in place.
      Once it is throwing exactly what I want it gets a handle and a label. Which powder, how many grains, and in some cases for which caliber.

      I use a lot of .38 special and .357 mag brass, some .223, I think I have one from a 7.62×39. You mess around till you find something that works.

      I bought the little harbor freight metal cutoff saw for trimming .223 into .300bo brass. That works so sweet for adjusting dippers. Take off an eight of an inch, chamfer and test.

    • #32585
      uncle jimbo
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      retread;n12991 wrote: Most folks around here use Bullseye. I have used it but I have found ETR7 or Vectan AS burn cleaner and perform about the same as
      Bullseye.

      I too would recommend ETR7. It is one of the cleanest burning powers I have found and easy to work with.

    • #32587
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      sundog;n13004 wrote: I like Red Dot. A lot. It does not meter well in small quantities. Any suggestions?

      When using my Lyman or RCBS powder measures I find that after I reach the end of the stroke (either fill or drop into the drum) I back of slightly and once again “tap” the end of the stroke. The Lyman has a “powder knocker” that may be used to “settle” the amount measured. With the Dillon I am careful to maintain consistency with my operation, and with “problem powders” I have taken to “tap” the powder measure at both ends of the stroke with my hand. Consistency is the key here. If I get hung up on some station I dump that powder drop and move on re-doing that case later. Every move of the handle results in vibration that affects the loading of the powder charge cylinder. Red Dot can be a challenge especially when loading very small charges such as 1.6 gr in my .380 practice rounds. WW231 meters better, but Red Dot has always been available when other powders were not.

    • #32588
      popper
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      WST works for me.

    • #32592
      Phil
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      I like Blue Dot for my cast 9mm pistol food.

    • #32600
      Sgt. Mike
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      lar45;n12988 wrote: A friends son came over with some empty 9mm brass and a bucket of wheel weights. I”m using Doc44’s Lee 120gn TC mold and have a bunch of bullets cast..
      What is a good powder that will burn clean with the 120 Lee?
      Thanks

      Glen, American Select will burn clean in the 9mm, I have not tried it with cast. But I don’t suspect it would act much different than jacketed.

      CaliberBulletCaseMinimum OAL
      (inches)
      Bbl LengthPrimerPowderCharge Weight
      (grains)
      Velocity
      (fps)
      Notes
      9mm Luger115 gr Speer GDHPSpeer1.1254CCI 500American Select5.41,102
      9mm Luger124 gr Speer GDHPSpeer1.124CCI 500American Select51,053
      9mm LugerSpeer 115 gr CPRNFederal1.1354CCI 500American Select51,128

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