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    • #33872
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      While processing a pile of 5.56/.223 brass I found quite a few that someone’s gun chewed up. It left a big uptick of brass on the case head. All were Aguila cases, so I assume it was the same gun. What might have caused this?

    • #33876
      Sgt. Mike
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      early extraction will bend rims. Although some AR’s have a rough extractor.
      Usually though is related to early extraction be that because of gas port size, weight of buffer, worn buffer spring, or type of powder used in the load.

    • #33881
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      The brass does not show any sign of the rim being bent due t a violet/early extraction. It is just the “lump” on the surface of the head.

    • #33884
      Anonymous
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      How many Cases are like that? 30 plus
      If not too many I would toss or
      at least keep to one batch (for when you are most likley to not be able to find them after you shoot them
      Could also be high pressure (ejector pin hole flow)

    • #33894
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      They are in the scrap bucket.
      I too wonder if they were not very high pressure as the brass around the primer pocket looks more like it had flown out rather than a crimp.

    • #33902
      Goodsteel
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      This is a sign of over-pressure loads. The mark you see is the brass flowing into the ejector hole. My money is on the Ruger Mini-14 as the culprit firearm. The rim damage wouldn’t be as broad with an AR-15. Regardless, I’d say deep six that stuff and don’t look back.

    • #33903
      Larry Gibson
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      Looks like over pressure to me too…….I’d toss the cases.

      May or may not be over pressure for the firearm, could just be over pressure for the cases.

    • #33904
      Goodsteel
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      Larry Gibson;n14746 wrote: Looks like over pressure to me too…….I’d toss the cases.

      May or may not be over pressure for the firearm, could just be over pressure for the cases.

      Aguila? My money’s on manufacture defect……..

    • #33910
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      If it were a manufacturing defect, the “lump” would be in the same place on each case. They are not. I think it was the load/gun. Just happened that they were all the same brass manufacturer. Makes me think it was all the same shooter.

    • #33911
      Goodsteel
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      I meant pertaining to the amount of propellant used in loads…….
      What you see there is a classic sign of over pressure loads. I assume they are factory loads, because most reloaders would pick up their brass by instinct.

    • #33915
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      I understand now what you meant Tim. Thanks for the clarification. What we have pretty much concluded is that these casings were from the same gun and were way high in pressure.

      Could this be due to them being loaded to 5.56 specs and fired in a .223 spec chamber?

      Has anyone ever fired any Aguila ammo in .223/5.56?

      Aguila’s website does list two distinct rounds:
      .223 REM 55 gr FMJ at 3,215 fps
      5.56 X 45 62 gr FMJBT at 3,150 fps

    • #33919
      Goodsteel
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      I doubt it, but I wouldn’t discount it as being a possible contributing factor. If people were half as aware of the danger of double charging their handloads as they are that one time in history 5.56 caused a little more boom in a 223 than the owner was comfortable with, we’d be a lot better off.
      That whole scare was pertaining to one style of military ball ammo that is no longer used.
      Same situation: Rounds are loaded a little hot in the first place, then used in a 12 twist Savage 340 with a short throat, and voila. Perfect storm.
      These days, most all 223 rifles are throated and twisted for the heavier/longer bullets (not that twist was a contributing factor, only a coincidence to the short throated barrels) and it’s no longer an issue IMHO. Back in the 60s, that was a different story.

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