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    • #22465
      DeadWoodDan
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      I purchased some material from Roto Metals and would like take some measurements. Have been doing the normal searches and youtube watches, but would like some more advice before proceeding. I am a little hesitant as those rifles I would like to do are bolt actions and I am concerned with how to get the alloy into the chamber successfully and not getting it into places that it shouldn’t be. Any help will be appreciated.
      thanks
      Kevin

    • #22476
      Goodsteel
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      1. Take the barreled action out of the stock, and clean the chamber and barrel carefully. Carburetor cleaner and a few clean patches will make short work of this.
      2. Make a dummy round, insert it in the chamber, and close the bolt.
      3. Push a cleaning rod with a tight fitting jag down the barrel till you feel it touch the tip of the bullet, and pull it back 1/4″-3/8″.
      4. Remove the bolt from the rifle along with the dummy round and set them aside.
      5. Upend the barreled action so that the muzzle is pointed down and vice it in that position (be careful not to bump your cleaning rod.
      6. Put on your gloves, and heat your chamber casting alloy in a good casting ladle with a spout on it (I use a RCBS casting ladle) and pause to play the flame over the chamber area of the rifle occasionally till the alloy is melted, and your rifle is hot to the touch. Obviously, don’t linger too much on the rifle. True, you would have to heat it to well over 800 degrees in order to damage the heat treatment of it, but there’s no sense getting even close, because it will mess up your chamber casting.
      7. Once the alloy is molten, and the rifle is hot, stick the spout of the ladle in the ejection port, and slowly pour in the alloy. You’re looking to fill the chamber and leave a little button just on top of the rear end of the barrel. Try to be controlled and deft in your actions here. You need a keen eye and a steady hand.
      8. Once the pour is complete, quickly and safely set the ladle in a predetermined spot so that it doesn’t spill the rest of your alloy (a catfood can or a tunafish can work great for this.) and then grab the barrel below the vice (where it is not hot), remove it from the vice, then lower it to the floor and gently bump the handle of your cleaning rod. You will see the chamber cast slid up into the action.
      9. Press/tap downward till the chamber cast is in the middle of the action. Be very careful at this point. The alloy is being held only by the cloth patch.
      10. Tip the action to the side as you cup your gloved hand over the ejection port. If you do it right, the fresh chamber cast will fall right into your hand, and you can set it gently on a soft cloth to finish cooling.

      That’s pretty much it.

    • #22479
      Sgt. Mike
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      Kevin,
      when using cerrosafe a ladle (the type for casting is perfect) can be heated with a propane touch.
      A patch (such as a cleaning patch should be placed ahead of the throat pour the heated cerrosafe count to about count to about 10 then tap out with a cleaning rod.
      Don’t wait too long LOL ask Goodsteel how I know…….

      durn it how does he type so much faster than I

    • #22480
      Goodsteel
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      It’s all in the wrist Sarge. LOL!

    • #22484
      Sgt. Mike
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      Kinda like casting????????

    • #22492
      DeadWoodDan
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      Thanks guys! hope to give this some practice soon

    • #22725
      Alphawolf45
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      I wish I had thought of that yesterday..I took the .32-20 barrel off an unfinished Win. 1873 project and installed it on my Winchester model 65..Had to lathe about .090 off the chamber end ,so ‘course now I got to ream it deeper..The question came up whether the chamber reamer that I originally cut the chamber with had cut a proper leade..I had made that chambering reamer a decade ago at a time when I didn’t compete , wasn’t highly concerned about accuracy….Had I made a chamber casting I’d have learned if my home made chamber reamer was good enough to use again .Instead I ordered a rental reamer @ $71.00 for 3 days…..That is money I’d rather spent on something else.

    • #24023
      DeadWoodDan
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      Finally got back to this project! Two successful casts completed. Did my .40S&W XDM just to make sure I had the process down, finished that and did the Mauser 98 chambered in 30-06. So now that I have the cast what can it tell me? More importantly How can I use this information to make a better round, perfect fit? Previously slugged this rifle and the cast still gives me that data. Guess I’m wanting to know what should I be looking for or measuring.

    • #24038
      Goodsteel
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      Look at your throat entrance. Look at how broad and long it is. That information can help you choose the correct diameter for the bullet you will use. Post the particulars here and I’ll help guide you to a good projectile for your situation.

    • #24079
      DeadWoodDan
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      Ok, Tim and others hoping my attachment comes through clear. It appears as if the rifling starts right away?

    • #24082
      Goodsteel
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      Good casting. I see a clearly defined throat there. Classic 30-06. The bullets you should look at are the Lyman 311466 and the 30XCB mold (there’s one for sale right now in the General Store).

      You see where the neck ends and the barrel begins? You want to take a very careful measurement right on that little smooth cylinder portion where it steps down from the neck. That is defined as your “throat entrance diameter”. That will tell you how big of a bullet you can get in there. Judging by the looks of it, I expect you will measure between .309 and .313.

      If this is the case, size your bullets to .310 lube with 2500+ and let the good times roll.

    • #24087
      DeadWoodDan
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      Thanks Tim. I thought the results looked good also, rifling goes right into the throat and didn’t think it showed much wear. I am assuming you are referring to the “lead” as the throat entrance diameter? I am getting .311″ measuring right above the neck, and that is the groove dimension also, about 0.3105-0.311″ Do they make a different micrometer or device for measuring the lead?

    • #24090
      Goodsteel
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      DeadWoodDan;n2216 wrote: Thanks Tim. I thought the results looked good also, rifling goes right into the throat and didn’t think it showed much wear. I am assuming you are referring to the “lead” as the throat entrance diameter? I am getting .311″ measuring right above the neck, and that is the groove dimension also, about 0.3105-0.311″ Do they make a different micrometer or device for measuring the lead?

      No, you have to do it carefully with a micrometer.
      I stand by my recommendations: 311466 or the 30XCB, size to .310.

      If you’ve never used the Hornady OAL gauge, I highly recommend. Most times, cast bullets will shoot best of you load to the exact OAL that you measure with the Hornady tool.

    • #24091
      DeadWoodDan
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      forgot to mention, I have the 30XCB and pretty much all other popular .30cal molds and then some. Don’t have the 311446, but seem to remember that you guys are finding the lover’n designs are getting better accuracy? I saw a new post by Larry and haven’t had time to catch up on the HV stuff, but going to this week.

    • #24092
      Goodsteel
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      Yes, the 311466 is really hard to beat. I believe I have shot more of that bullet design than all the others put together over the years. It’s just a great bullet.
      That said, I am of the opinion that the 30XCB is a slightly superior design across the board, so since you have it, I wouldn’t hesitate to use it. Try to find an accurate load in the 1700-2000FPS range. I think you’ll like it!

    • #24407
      dragon813gt
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      You guys make it sound really easy to do. I attempted it once on an Arisaka 99. Worked great until I over filled the chamber and it ran all over the place. What a pain to clean up as it got into areas of the rifle it shouldn’t have. Thankfully the only purpose of the cast was to determine if had been set back to chamber 300 Savage. It was my grandfather’s rifle and no one knew for sure. Determined it was indeed a 300 Savage.

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