• This topic has 4 replies, 1 voice, and was last updated 4 years ago by JRR.
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    • #31480
      JRR
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      I recently bought this mold and cast my first 150 bullets with the deep hollow cavity. Ladle poured. I only messed up 12. I was very happy since this was my first time with hollow point pins.

      With a blend of 66% coww and 33% #2 the weight dropped was ~146.5gr.

      I did a bell curve weight lay out and the predominant or center was 146.5gr.

      The spread with 90% was 2 grains. 146-147.

      Is this spread OK with this type of mold design?

      With a RCBS 180gr. steel, 2 cavity non HP, I can get a somewhat tighter spread.

      I find it interesting that this very light 40 cal. is the same weight as the heaviest 9mm.

      Jeff

    • #31506
      Sgt. Mike
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      1.3% deviation is acceptable for most usage, little bit more practice and I’m sure you will get that down to 1 grain.

      But having said that, the pin that creates the hollow point is challenging on my NOE 45 with the RG2/4 set-up, a 2 grain deviation is great for that pistol bullet. The problem is the pin does shift a bit within the mold so yes I do think overall what you are getting is quite good

    • #31530
      Goodsteel
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      I agree with Sarge. God bless NOE, and I wouldn’t say anything against them, but I can’t get consistent bell curves with the HP molds to save my life. No matter how careful I am to jiggle the blocks shut consistently, those HP pins have a mind of their own.
      For the purpose you would probably use this bullet for, I doubt it makes a nickels worth of difference. If you’re trying to shoot them into a cloverleafing cluster at 100 yards, then try slipping a punch through the cavity and seating the HP pins before you shut the sprue plate and put a nick on one cavity so you can plot a bell curve for each cavity.
      But if you’re planning on shooting this in a pistol at close range, let the rough edge drag man!!! There just ain’t enough juice in that lemon to be worth the squeeze!

    • #31581
      dragon813gt
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      What ranges do you plan on shooting them at? I ask because they are pistol bullets so the ranges are usually a lot less than w/ a rifle. I know we all want the most accurate rounds as possible. But we also have to work w/in the limitations of the guns they’re being shot from. I weigh pistol bullets for voids and that’s it.

      Add me to the list that can’t cast a consistent weight w/ NOE’s RG style molds. His non RG molds cast the same weights w/ boring accuracy. I only own two RG molds because of this. And both of them are set up to produce a non hollow point bullet. I’ve had good luck casting consistent weights w/ Mihec’s molds. They cast the same weights w/ boring accuracy as well. But I have the plug pins installed in all of them that have them. I guess you can say I grew out of the hollow point fad pretty quickly.

    • #31587
      JRR
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      Thanks guys for the feedback. These are simply pistol bullets for 25 yards and under. I wanted a lightweight 40 bullet and at the time this was the only NOE available. I have 5 other NOE molds that are all very good. I think I’ll put the flat point plugs in and make some hollow points for the novelty.

      I would not have bothered with the bell curve layout, but my curiosity got the best of me. My first delve into hollow points.
      Jeff

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