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    • #24189
      Kevin S
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      When you are neck sizing your brass. Do you want the inside dia. of the case to be a measureable .002″ under the bullet dia. you are using. Or do you size so that the stud in the Lyman M die is .002 under bullet size? Which in the last case (no pun intended) will give you a dia. less than the .002 under bullet dia.
      Sorry if this is a stupid question. But I am a novist to loading for accuracy. Rather than for blasting ammo.

    • #24193
      Harter
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      The ideal is .002 under your desired bullet diameter.

    • #24198
      Newt
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      I’ve been working with neck tension a bit in my .223. I found that it likes more than less. By that I mean, I size my cases and use a M type expander that measures .222″. I also have an expander that measures .224″, but the groups were noticeably different with that tension. My bullets are sized a bit over .225″(probably .2255″).

      So I would not be set on a particular size, but try different sizes and see how it effects things.

    • #24199
      Goodsteel
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      Each case has it’s own preferences depending on thickness and hardness. Typically, I use a mandrel that is the same size as the bullet for stiff necks, and -.001 or .002 for thin annealed necks.
      I don’t really care for the Lyman M die, as I think NOE is making a far superior solution.

    • #24208
      IllinoisCoyoteHunter
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      Yep, there is really no right or wrong way to do it. The one thing you need to watch for is bullet set back during chambering. Most issues with bullet setback occur in auto loaders. Some benchrest shooters will size their brass so that a bullet can be seated with finger pressure alone. It is all what shoots best for you, safely.

      Kevin, there is no such thing as a stupid question. I still consider myself a noob even though I started reloading 8 years ago. This is a great question that others will greatly benefit from the answers already given and the answers to come.

    • #24349
      Newt
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      Those NOE expanders are what I am using for my .223 They are very nice and I’ll be picking up more for my other calibers. I’ve always just used the lee universal and only flared.

    • #24385
      Goodsteel
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      There’s not right or wrong way to dig a ditch either………till you use a Kobota backhoe.
      LOL!

      Honestly, I totally agree. Great post!

    • #24850
      Doc Highwall
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      Once you get your bullet size down that the gun prefers and the powder charge, consistent neck tension will be what you will be chasing. With each firing and re-sizing of the case the neck tension will change.

      Remember in talking accuracy and precision there are three variables that form a triangle, first you need a good shooter, second you need a good gun, and third you need good ammo. If any one of these three thing are not up to snuff, the whole thing fails.

      Obviously a full blown match rifle should do better than a average factory rifle,never mind a worn out rifle.

      Check out a posting I made in equipment about annealing and consistency, this is how I am going to control neck tension.

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