• This topic has 5 replies, 1 voice, and was last updated 4 years ago by Phil.
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    • #31189
      mountain4don
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      I have a Browning 1885 in 45-70 that I bought 25 years ago or so. I also bought RCBS 300 and 500 grain gas checked molds to try in it. With the shallow rifling in this gun, I have had much better luck shooting jacketed bullets in it. So, I am looking for suggestions for making these cast bullets shoot more accurately, as in loads and powders and primers for them. I have used the 500 grain bullet for deer hunting but had really bad luck with it. I shot one deer in a group of 4 that was standing slightly to one side, but two of the other deer fell over also. And my wife was out to a meeting that night and couldn’t drive the tractor down with a trailer to help me pick them all up.

    • #31192
      WCM
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      What is your bore diameter and what size cast bullets are you using?
      I have found with shallow riflings like in my Ruger #1 .405 win ,I need to size two thousands over bore dia.

      You may have to order a custom mold to get a bullet large enough.

      I have had good luck using the RCBS 405 GC bullet in various .45/70 ,but I am usually sizing .458 or .459

    • #31195
      Harter
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      Sounds like the penetration is working…. 🙂

      GS has a long history of trial and error with several of your rifle .
      at this point I’m not much help but more following for informational purposes.

      I know you need a bullet .002 over groove diameter , the Lee 457-340 doesn’t carry enough lube to get past 20″ or so and in this particular cartridge the idiom of soft an slow or hard and fast , alloy to powder relationship, is very true . A wad card may or may not help .
      ​​​

    • #31196
      Goodsteel
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      mountain4don;n11220 wrote: I have a Browning 1885 in 45-70 that I bought 25 years ago or so. I also bought RCBS 300 and 500 grain gas checked molds to try in it. With the shallow rifling in this gun, I have had much better luck shooting jacketed bullets in it. So, I am looking for suggestions for making these cast bullets shoot more accurately, as in loads and powders and primers for them. I have used the 500 grain bullet for deer hunting but had really bad luck with it. I shot one deer in a group of 4 that was standing slightly to one side, but two of the other deer fell over also. And my wife was out to a meeting that night and couldn’t drive the tractor down with a trailer to help me pick them all up.

      What is the accuracy you are experiencing right now?
      What alloy? What lube?
      What process did you use to come to your results?

      You say the rifling is shallow? What’s your bore and groove diameter’s in thousandths of an inch?

      Harter;n11226 wrote: Sounds like the penetration is working…. 🙂

      Lee 457-340 doesn’t carry enough lube to get past 20″ or so
      ​​​

      I disagree. Use modern lubes by White Label, and it’s fine. The bullet design is lacking though.

    • #31209
      Harter
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      Old skool mechanic ya know . If it ain’t leaking it won’t run 🙂
      ​​​​​​

    • #31626
      Phil
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      I have a Browning BPCR in 45-70. The RCBS mounds gave me small bullets. I needed .460″. A custom mold (AM461425B) worked out with Tom at Accurate Molds gave me a nice bullet with good accuracy using 29 grains of H4198.

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