Viewing 7 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #24696
      Newt
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 3
      • Comments: 40
      • Overall: 43

      I am now in the process of doing the bedding job on my gun. Got the action stripped and the barrel channel cleaned from the high points/pressure areas.

      So now I am wondering how much of the action to bed. I see two different ways of people doing it. One is to bed the front lug area and the rear tang area only. The other is to also bed in the middle. I personally do not see a reason to bed the middle on my gun as the only part of the receiver that would be touching is about 1/8 inch strip down each side. I set the barrel in and looked underneath through the mag well and also saw that if I was not careful I would cause issues with the trigger group openings.

      Is there a reason to bed the entire length instead of those two main areas of contact? There does not seem to be much talk about it one way or the other on the internet.

    • #24699
      Goodsteel
      Keymaster
      • Gold
      • ★★★
      • Posts: 208
      • Comments: 2452
      • Overall: 2660

      Everybody has their on way of doing this, but personally, I bed the whole thing. Those thin rails don’t lend much stiffness to the action and they need all the help they can get. Installing a good Badger rail with #8 screws does a lot to stiffen up the 700 action as well, but honestly, bedding the whole thing is cheap insurance.

    • #24702
      rhbrink
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 1
      • Comments: 22
      • Overall: 23

      Years ago I was taught to bed the front ring plus two inches of the barrel pretty much the chamber area and the rear of the action making sure that sure that the bedding does not come up behind the little flat spot of the rear of the action. Actually this small area can be trimmed out later. Of course this is after the barrel is free floated. If done carefully I install pillars at the same time but for the first time it might be easier to bed pillars first? This has always worked very well for me but it is very important to get the action setting in the stock stress free which takes more work and care than most people realize which Goodsteel is referring to about the action rails being very easy to stress.

      RB

    • #24763
      lead-1
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 8
      • Comments: 82
      • Overall: 90

      Tim or whoever, can a stock for a short action 700 in say 308 caliber, varmint contour be put on a same configuration rifle of say 22-250 and be a reasonably well fit?

    • #24773
      Goodsteel
      Keymaster
      • Gold
      • ★★★
      • Posts: 208
      • Comments: 2452
      • Overall: 2660

      Depends. If it’s not been bedded for the other rifle I would say yes. If it has been bedded, then the difference in lug and barrel profiles is going to bite you.
      If it doesn’t fit, then you’ll have to mill out the old bedding compound/inlet the stock for the new barreled action and re-bed things perfectly.
      No two actions are alike, and the closest you’ll ever get to a “universal stock” is either an aluminum V-bedding block (which is still improved upon by traditional bedding) or the stock is like classic Remington: universally sloppy.

    • #24796
      lead-1
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 8
      • Comments: 82
      • Overall: 90

      Ok thanks, I was tempted to buy a stock that was bedded for a rifle that was sold and then the guy decided to sell the stock. We both had 700 short action rifles, probably glad I didn’t buy it.

    • #25744
      Newt
      Participant
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 3
      • Comments: 40
      • Overall: 43

      Well I got the M700 pillard and put to bed! Yes, “pillard” is what I call a “newtism”. Anyways, it took a while to do it all because halfway through I got caught in the middle of a hog butchering session. I’ll take pictures once I get the barrel channel finished, but it turned out OK. Not perfect in looks, but for sure perfect in function. Actually, the only main ugliness was where I must have wiped off some release agent from the tang and some of the epoxy stuck. Yes, that was a bad feeling when at first the gun would not come out of the stock.

      I shot it afterwards and the groups were not good at all with previous loads. I then tried to put a pad under the barrel where the stock was originally pressing against it, near the for end. When I did that, the groups really opened up and went way far away from POA. Realizing that the barrel floating job was not adequate, I opened up the barrel channel even more, around a .025″ clearance. Now I can shoot a good sub-moa group with jacketed bullets. However, with my original cast load its not as good. So I will have to work up a load once again. I hope I can find an acceptable load like I did before.

      Its kind of depressing in a way to have been shooting pretty decent and then change it all up, but I believe its worth it because now I can eliminate the action and screw torque from my testings. Before just a little change and my POI would change and groups would open up. I have no doubt I’ll be able to get a good cast load, just a matter of time. Until then, its nice to know that my jacketed loads will hit where I am aiming each time I pull the gun out.

      I took the “bubba” route with the pillar/bed job. Used 1/2″ steel lamp rod and JB weld epoxy, using Johnsons paste wax for release agent and foam/plumbers putty for the action/stock holes. Putting the trigger group back in was a bit tedious not ever having done something like that before also. I would recommend lots of pictures and careful consideration of how you take it out to anyone who has never done it before. I now understand there is a right and wrong way of doing it……

      I feel it was worth the time and effort and learned a lot from it. Out of pocket expense was $15 too. The barrel being thin, and the stock being thin, still allow the two to touch somewhat if you give it a good smack, but I do not see any way around that and it does not seem to effect the shots now that I opened it up. I suppose I could cut a channel and epoxy a steel rod in the stock.

    • #27282
      Goodsteel
      Keymaster
      • Gold
      • ★★★
      • Posts: 208
      • Comments: 2452
      • Overall: 2660

      Newt;n4167 wrote: The barrel being thin, and the stock being thin, still allow the two to touch somewhat if you give it a good smack, but I do not see any way around that and it does not seem to effect the shots now that I opened it up. I suppose I could cut a channel and epoxy a steel rod in the stock.

      Or you could put a real stock on it. Just sayin. Boyd’s will sell you a nice laminated wood stock for 1 1/2 bills that will make good use of your bedding compound, and maintain a level of stiffness, deliver good groups, and look decent.

Viewing 7 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

© 2017 Goodsteel Forum. Designed by Covalent Designs, LLC.