Viewing 5 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #29239
      Anonymous
      Inactive
      • Bronze
      • Posts: 13
      • Comments: 73
      • Overall: 86

      Bedding Question
      So I picked up a new to me HVA Rifle (Husqvarna 98 action made in 1964-5) its a box mag, long action in 308 with a 1/12 twist –wood stock
      Stock was refinished and lots of varnish(bumps ripples) left in the barrel channel so Barrel was not free floated and made inconsistant contact

      Well after some work it is free floated (still needs a final sand) 2 pcs of paper and it drags in one spot when held in the horozantal position with pressure on bottom end of stock
      (like it was on bags) 2 pc of paper cause it might settle a bit later and it is a wood stock

      Do I bed it or should i shoot it and leave it as is — I have not yet fired this rifle

      to remove action from stock I have to almost pry it and when it goes back in I have to squeze it with hand pressure till it is close enough to get the action screws in and the action screw will pull it the last 1/8-1/16 or so.

      When sanding I stayed away from action recoil lug area and if i do bed it will have to remove material from lug area (heel area pops loose easy)
      Not sure if it the bottom or the sides or the recoil lug that are tight

      What do I do if i bed it i might never get it out of stock again

      Thanks
      Wayne

    • #29244
      Waksupi
      Participant
      • Silver
      • ★★
      • Posts: 6
      • Comments: 106
      • Overall: 112

      Until you fire it, it is impossible to answer this question. For now, treat it like a sore pecker.

    • #29245
      Goodsteel
      Keymaster
      • Gold
      • ★★★
      • Posts: 208
      • Comments: 2452
      • Overall: 2660

      I would bed it personally, but understand that a Mauser has so much contact with the bottom metal, you must completely bed the box also.

      The tools you need for this job ar as follows and should not be substituted:

      Devcon 10-110 compound. (cheapest place to get it: Amazon)
      Brownells Acrarelease (yes it’s expensive. You can only get it from brownells. and you better not deviate from it when bedding a Mauser).
      Guide bolts (these are just threaded 1/4″ rods that you screw into the action to keep things lined up while the bedding cures)
      Roll of paper towels
      WD-40 spray can (get the big one, you’ll need it)
      New box of Qtips with plastic handles. (you need something you can press hard with.)
      New roll of Scotch brand electricians tape (that’s Scotch. Trust me.)
      Plumbers putty (I use that from Ace hardware)
      A good scale that goes to 2 lb.
      A dozen plastic cups with smooth bottoms that you can scrape out easily and mix epoxy in.
      5/16 pine dowel rod. (cut this into 8″ lengths and slim the ends down to look like a pop-cycle stick.

      So once you have these things listed above, you are ready to bed a rifle.

      1. Relieve all the wood inside the stock so that the rifle can fall in and fall out. Totally loose assembly. Hog out extra material around the recoil lug area, and undercut the three tang areas for the action and bottom metal. (Leave enough support so that the action is still held in it’s respective level though.)

      2. Dry build. Make sure things go right together easily and effortlessly. Simply put the bottom metal in the stock, then vice the stock on the bench. Your action needs to have the guide screws in place. Feed them through the bottom metal. till the action sits nicely in the stock. If the holes in the bottom metal are tight, then monkey with things till you can slide the action straight down into the stock with ease.

      3. Did you dry build? You didn’t skip step two did you? You know you screwed this job up already if you didn’t take care of step 2!!!!

      4. Take everything apart and use the plumbers putty to fill any place that could make a mechanical lock. The hole that hangs the trigger, the sear slot, or any deep rust pits. Pay the most attention to the bottom metal. Putty the area in front of the front bushing like your life depends on it. This is such a big square feature that the bedding compound often pushes it out of the way and locks it anyway. Be prepared, this is a problem area. Get the slot inside the box where your floorplate clips in. If you have a hinged floor plate, remove it, and focus on puttying the hinge slot and cross pin hole. Catch the trigger slot as well. If you have a rifle that was drilled with a Hatcher hole on the left or right side of the front ring, catch that also.

      5. Put one of your cups on the scale and tare it. This is no time to be stingy with your bedding compound. Once you break the seal it’s toast in 4 months anyway, so don’t hold back. Use the heavy part first and put plenty in the cup for the job at hand. Once you think you have enough, look at the scale reading. Punch the weight into the calculator and divide by 9. This tells you how much of the white paste to add for the perfect mix. Tare the scale and add the white second part to the cup till you have exactly one 9th the weight of the first part. Take the cup off the scale and stir it up with your dowel. Do not hold back, stir that cup thoroughly.

      6. Spray your action and guide bolts with Acrarelease and set it aside. Do the same to the bottom metal, but lay down an extra thick coat on the sides of the box.

      7. Paste your bedding compound on the side walls inside the stock, as well as the tang areas, and vice it upside down. Don’t hold back here. You need a lot of it.
      Do the same to your bottom metal (that is, paste the compound on thick on every surface you intend to have bedded) and push it into the stock till it seats in it’s home position. This will make the compound squish out everywhere which is what you want.

      8. Spray paper towels with WD-40 and clean up all the squish out, but do not let your towels compromise the clean wood on the action side. Don’t worry about what squiched out inside the action area. Just get your holes clear, and get everything off the outside of the stock and inside the mag box.

      9. Flip the stock over and repeat this process with the action, and here’s where your dry build comes in. There’s bedding everywhere and you need to be able to find the holes for the guide pins and feed them in by feel.

      10. Once you have the action pushed into the stock, use more paper towels and Q-tips to wipe up all excess squeeze out. This usually takes half a roll of towels and 1/4 of a box of Q-tips. Don’t hold back. Wipe, scrub, and wipe some more.

      11. Once you have everything wiped up and clean, take your electricians tape and run about 10-20 turns around the receiver and the bottom metal, right over the guide pins. In fact, when I wrap the stock I take one turn to the front then one to the rear of the guide pin. I usually put blocks over the rear tang of the receiver, and the front tang of the bottom metal to make sure I get a good press that is unhindered by the stock wood.
      This will cause additional squeeze out of the bedding compound. If its excessive, that just means that you never got it fully seated in the first place. No biggy unless it gets under the tape tuns. If that happens, you’ll be refinishing the stock. If you don’t care to refinish, cut the tape, wipe up again, then retape the stock.
      Ideally, you want a little squeeze out so that it makes just a small bead to pooch out around the perimeter. Once the bedding sets, it shrinks slightly, so if you wiped too much out of the seams, you’ll have shoddy looking edges that you can’t clean up flush with the stock wood.

      One area of caution: no matter if you have a clean seam or not, do not spare the ejection port area from wiping every last bit of bedding you can. This area has caused me more grief than any other when the bedding makes a mechanical lock on the window and when the action is removed, it tears chunks out of the wood surrounding that window. Ye be warned.

      Once the bedding is completely set (give it 4 hours at least this time of year. Overnight is better) Use pliers to twist the guide pins to crack them loose, but do not remove them. With a rubber mallet, strike the bottom of the barrel such that it transfers a jiggle up through the action (this takes a little finesse) Then take a sledge and tap the front guide pin, Then the rear. (notice I said “Tap”? That means a light tap. If you think it’s a good idea to go wailing on your 1/4″ pins with a 2lb sledge, I don’t know what to say for you. It’s just like doing a pound cast in a barrel. You’re using light blows from a heavy hammer to transfer energy deep into the work piece. Try to do it right please.). Repeat these steps striking the barrel, then the front pin, then the rear pin till you work the action out of the stock. Go slow and pay attention.
      Once it’s apparent that the action is free of the stock and the pins are the only thing holding it, unscrew them and pull them from the bottom of the stock, then wiggle the action the rest of the way out of the stock.
      Whew! There’s the top part. Now for the bottom metal:

      Use a 5/16 aluminum dowel in the impression made be the thread boss on the bottom metal right in the middle of the recoil lug impression. Strike this with the sledge while the stock is held in the vice. Then use it to strike the blade at the rear of the magazine box that is sticking up inside the stock.
      Back and forth, one then the other till you work that bottom metal out.

      Once you have the bottom metal out, and there are no chunks of wood pulled out that need to be superglued back in place, all that’s left is to file off all the excess bedding inside the stock so your trigger controls work unhindered and the parts can be put together and taken apart easily.

      In my opinion, this is where a bedding job really shines and shows the professionalism of the smith that did it. If all the edges look rough, and it’s obvious the guy just ripped it out with a dremel tool, it’s a crap chute. On the other hand, if care was taken to make all the edges look clean and finished well, it looks awesome. I actually use acrylic paint with a fine artists brush to blacken the edges of the bedding so it looks clean and tight, but you do whatever you feel is right.

    • #29285
      Waksupi
      Participant
      • Silver
      • ★★
      • Posts: 6
      • Comments: 106
      • Overall: 112

      I go about bedding a bit differently. I always use the T bolts from Brownells. I make sure the action and barrel are sitting correctly in the stock, when the bolts are tightened. If things are not fit correctly, you will torque and twist the action, and throwing away some accuracy.
      Once everything is sitting properly in the stock, I mark the stock in line with the T bolts, and count how many rotations it takes to bottom out the metal. I mark it on the stock, so I don’t forget.
      I then apply the bedding compound, and put the bolts back in, going to the same amount of turns, and indexing back to my witness marks.
      Get a jug of white vinegar and a roll of paper towels, it will make your clean up LOTS easier.

      Another tip for Acragel. If it gets old and crystallizes on you, put it in the micro wave for a few seconds. Back to the creamy consistency.

    • #29309
      Goodsteel
      Keymaster
      • Gold
      • ★★★
      • Posts: 208
      • Comments: 2452
      • Overall: 2660

      Different strokes Waksupi. You’ve probably bedded more rifles than I’ve ever had through my shop.

    • #29320
      Waksupi
      Participant
      • Silver
      • ★★
      • Posts: 6
      • Comments: 106
      • Overall: 112

      Just another arrow in the quiver.

Viewing 5 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

© 2017 Goodsteel Forum. Designed by Covalent Designs, LLC.