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    • #32516
      Anonymous
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      I loaded up some light loads for .303 Brit. using Bullseye and they really shot dirty… After 10 rounds without incident. #11 bullet suck in barrel. Drove bullet out with aluminum rod. Case looked real dirty. Ran bore brush down barrel a couple of times. Shot again, bullet stuck in barrel. Rammed it out and fired again. Another stuck bullet. Didn’t know Bullseye was this dirty, see photo below. shot 10 rounds as noted above, last 3 rounds stuck in barrel. Photo of the last 2 rounds.

      Load data:
      Bullet.. 123 gr .311 plated (Berry’s plated 7.62×39)
      Powder.. 3.2 gr Bullseye
      Filler.. Dacron tuft, small, just enough to hold powder against primer.
      Primer.. CCI #200 large rifle

    • #32518
      Mike F H
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      That mess is melted Dacron,stop using it and use more bullseye powder,one or two grains for a start,personally I would tumble lube the projectiles in Lee Liquid Alox also.Lee Enfields have a generous neck diameter and light loads often fail to seal on firing,possibly annealing the case necks would help.A larger diameter bullet would also be beneficial.

    • #32519
      Scharfschuetze
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      Mike is right. Up your load. There is no need for Dacron with Bullseye.

      I normally use Bullseye for my cast bullet squib loads and Unique for light jacketed bullet loads. No scientific reason, just seems right to me.

    • #32520
      Anonymous
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      Mike F H;n12955 wrote: That mess is melted Dacron, stop using it

      Ok, no more Dacron.

      use more bullseye powder,one or two grains for a start

      Use more? One or two grains to start? I’m using 3.2 gr now… Not sure what you mean?

      Lee Enfields have a generous neck diameter and light loads often fail to seal on firing

      Here’s a little more info on what I did.
      I loaded 10 rounds went out back and shot all 10 with out any problem. Went back in the shop and loaded 10 more and that’s when the problem started. The carbon from the Dacron must have cooled while I was loading thus making the bullets stick.

      I think cleaning the gunk out of the barrel, loading with no Dacron and maybe upping the load slightly will improve things.

    • #32521
      JPHolla
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      Bullseye is a little dirty. I keep meaning to try Red Dot; it’s supposed to be cleaner. I kinda feel it is a little “peaky” for jacketed bullets, but those plated ones are not nearly as hard and are probably a good match. I never use fillers with flake powders. They typically burn consistently because they are easy to ignite. If a load doesn’t burn consistently (with flake powders, anyway) I feel the load is not appropriate. I feel inconsistency with fast-burning powders is courting danger.

    • #32524
      Anonymous
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      JPHolla;n12959 wrote: Bullseye is a little dirty…

      Yes, and the carbonized Dacron sure didn’t help… Won’t make that mistake again.

      I kinda feel it is a little “peaky” for jacketed bullets, but those plated ones are not nearly as hard and are probably a good match.

      I was thinking the same thing about the plated bullets. They’re rated at 1900 fps max. That’s why I wanted to try them… That and I bought 1k last year and haven’t had a chance to try them in anything.

      I must say the first 10 rounds shot pretty consistently from what I could see and feel. After a couple rounds I took the ear muffs off. The rest sounded just quieter than a .22 rifle but louder than an air rifle.

    • #32525
      Mike F H
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      tbx-4;n12958 wrote:

      Ok, no more Dacron.

      Use more? One or two grains to start? I’m using 3.2 gr now… Not sure what you mean?
      I meant one or two grains more than your 3.2 grain load.

      Here’s a little more info on what I did.
      I loaded 10 rounds went out back and shot all 10 with out any problem. Went back in the shop and loaded 10 more and that’s when the problem started. The carbon from the Dacron must have cooled while I was loading thus making the bullets stick.

      I think cleaning the gunk out of the barrel, loading with no Dacron and maybe upping the load slightly will improve things.

      I meant one or two more grains more than the 3.2 grain load you were using.

    • #32528
      GhostHawk
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      First, I prefer Red Dot.

      Second, your load is too low. Up your load a bit. If you stick even one you are too low. If you stick one at 2 grains increase by a third and try again.

      Third, fast powders do not need fillers. Some ignite better than others though. Which may be part of why I prefer Red Dot.

      My best load, across at least 4 calibers is 4.6 grains of Red Dot. I use it in .223 rem, 7.62×39, .300BO, .357 mag. In all it is quiet, accurate to 100 yards, my .357 will stack bullets if you can do your job.

      I also use it in my .444 marlin with 13 grains behind a 310 gr gas checked cast boolit.
      And in my Mosin at 10 grains under a 185 gr gas checked .314 boolit.

      At 4.6 grains per load a pound of Red Dot which can be found at very reasonable prices will give you 1500 rounds per pound. Now that is as thrifty as anyone could ask for.
      Personally I like Ballistic products, my last 8lb jug of Red Dot cost me 22$ at my door including shipping and hazmat fee’s.

      That comes out to 1.5 cents worth of powder per load.

    • #32532
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      I use Red Dot for my light loads. It does burn cleaner. The Lyman Cast Bullet Manual shows data for almost all cartridges. It only gets “peaky” when near top end loads. An additional benefit is that it is fluffier for the same charge weight resulting in taking up more case volume.

    • #32533
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      Ed Harris’ The Load uses Red Dot. I’ve used 10 gr in .303 Brit under Lee’s 185 RN GC.

      http://www.hensleygibbs.com/edharris/articles/The%20Load.htm

    • #32536
      Reg
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      Yup, no Dacron and use Red dot or up the charge. You need to get a quicker and better seal of that neck to prevent the flow back of the gas along side the neck. You might get an accuracy increase as a bonus. Also you might consider Unique or Herco. Either ( along with Red Dot ) will give a reduced load that will give good performance.

      Playing with the accuracy factor, some powders are “position sensitive ” in the respect accuracy can vary according to where it is lying in the case. If where it is lying, either front or rear, you can get unequal ignition and the pressure curve will vary and so will the accuracy. When using such powders, I tip the barrel up each time to set the powder in the rear of the case right in front of the powder. In some cases, this really makes a noticeable difference. Another time by using the reduced load but switching to Magnum primers really brought in the accuracy.
      Many ways to skin a cat.

    • #32541
      seaboltm
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      I have used light charges of BE in 38 special. Had squib that lodged the bullet in the barrel. Hot gasses actually burned the brass, in some spots burning holes all the way through the brass. Looks like you have some of that effect too, especially the picture on the right.

    • #32543
      Larry Gibson
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      Yes, up the load of Bullseye. I use 3.2 gr of Bullseye in cast lightly lubricated 85 – 100 gr bullets. It is an excellent load for that range of cast bullets. With the hard plated 123 gr bullets I’d work to 8.5 gr.

      No Dacron or other filler is need as mentioned with Bullseye powder.

      I’ve shot a lot of Red Dot powder in such loads and have not found it any “cleaner” or to give any better accuracy, especially at the low end “cat’s sneeze” load level. That’s just my experience having shot thousands of such loads in just about every 30 and 31 caliber cartridges up through 30-06 capacity. However, anyone want to give me an 8 lb jug to test please don’t hesitate…….:rolleyes:

      Also I prefer to use well fire formed cases that are just NS’d for such loads. If you can I also prefer dedicated cases with the flash holes drilled out with a 31 – 28 drill. That alleviates case headspace setback with rimless cases and allows the primer flash to get into the case faster and more completely giving better ignition and less position sensitivity.

      Larry Gibson

    • #32544
      Anonymous
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      Larry Gibson;n12981 wrote: With the hard plated 123 gr bullets I’d work to 8.5 gr…

      Also I prefer to use well fire formed cases that are just NS’d for such loads. If you can I also prefer dedicated cases with the flash holes drilled out with a 31 – 28 drill. That alleviates case headspace setback with rimless cases and allows the primer flash to get into the case faster and more completely giving better ignition and less position sensitivity.

      Larry Gibson

      Thanks Larry. I was working from some of your old posts on Cast Boolits. I just wasn’t sure where to start.

      These cases were fire formed. I’ll set some aside just for the light loads. I have a good supply of .303 brass. I’ll need a way to mark them to keep them from being mixed up to standard load brass.

    • #32546
      Anonymous
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      seaboltm;n12979 wrote: Had squib that lodged the bullet in the barrel. Hot gasses actually burned the brass, in some spots burning holes all the way through the brass. Looks like you have some of that effect too, especially the picture on the right.

      Yes, you caught that. Good eye. I kind of figured the hot gasses eroded the brass.

    • #32554
      Bullseye67
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      Good morning, I was “gifted” 2, 3 pound containers of WW 540. Same as HS6. I have been using it for a lot of my cast loads. I found that there was a sweet spot at 8-8.5 grains and a cast 170ish grain boolit in 30-06. I just loaded some to try in 303 I will shoot some more in the spring. My fall work up shows really good accuracy, no leading and a clean case. I was just neck sizing and reusing the same 20 cases. The Buchanan press Randy makes works really well on the range. I have used small charges of bullseye in 30-30, but no filler and it was clean but I was using a sized.32 wadcutters at 25 yards and I seemed to get tumbling so I switched to a hornady 100 grain SJ Lead and it was better but I gave up and just “paid the ransom” for 22 LR.
      Have a Happy and healthy 2017!!!

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