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    • #28654
      Reg
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      Just wondering how the gardens were doing across the country. Late but doing good out on the great golden high plains.
      3 different kinds of potatoes, pole lima beans, 65 tomato plants, 74 different peppers of about 7 or 8 different varieties from boring mild to WOW hot, the Snow Peas seem to be running their course due to heat but will plant again this fall. Deliberately planted the corn late so we will have time to can it this fall.
      Lots of onions of many kinds and the garlic looks great. Noticed bird seed is getting higher and higher so we planted a long row of sunflowers, hope to get at least a 50 gallon plastic barrel of seed. Our winters are sometimes really rough so we always try to put out a little for the feathered friends that don’t migrate.
      Parsnips and carrots are well up and looking good. Parsnip seed doesn’t seem to keep it’s viability so for the past few years we have always kept a few plants in the back of one of the raised beds and let them go to seed in the second year, have had good seed ever since.
      The last couple of years we have noticed that the seed packs only seem to get higher and higher in price and contain fewer seeds all the time so we have been going more to the heirloom varieties and saving seeds. More work to do but seems to be working out very well.

      How are you guys doing ???

    • #28659
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      I have three zucchini plants and two cucumber plants that are doing pretty good. I should eat the first zucchini this weekend. I’ve tried watermelon, cantelope, tomato, and jalapeno peppers here too. But, it is just too high and the season too short even being in New Mexico. Altitude is 7400 ft. The tomatoes tried last year, but the deer liked the foliage too much.

    • #28660
      chutesnreloads
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      No garden this year but noticed a couple weeks back the pumpkin we threw out last fall has sprouted and is blooming………also planted peach seed and pecans….more to atract wildlife than for us….we’ll see if anything comes of it

    • #28667
      Wright Arms
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      I don’t have much. Just 8 tomato plants and my girls’ flowers. Tomatos are looking real good right now and setting lots of fruit, but later in the season, things always seem to go south in one way or another. I’d like to do more, but I’m just too busy to keep up with it. I can’t stand to not grow some tomatos every year, though.

    • #28679
      Goodsteel
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      I have no garden, but if I ever do, I’ve got an impressive collection of 22″-26″ tomato stakes. LOL!

    • #28683
      Harter
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      No garden here …well an extensive rock garden . .
      Ms works in the local hospital kitchen however and we stack the over runs ,day Olds and sometimes “2nd” pretty deep.
      Couple of weeks ago she she got 3+ bushel of corn in husk for $15. Deals like that it’s not worth even breaking ground here.

    • #28686
      Reg
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      Three bushels of corn is a good deal anywhere. If you can get food like that in canable quantities there would be no need for a garden for sure.
      Another good thing to can up is the humble potato. Canned they are already cooked which reduces the cooking time.. Open a jar, slice and fry up for breakfast or dinner or just open the jar, nuke well an serve with butter and sat and pepper. You can also open, drain , slice and use in many casseroles or scalloped.
      Also while hunting, I like to can pheasants and cotton tail rabbits but best to check your game laws first. Even canned , on the shelf and several years old, they still count against your possession limit.

      o

      Any tough meat, even case hardened pheasant will be so tender it will fall off the bones once canned.
      And fish, take that trash fish the carp. Cut a few fillets from a couple of good sized carp and can
      up. You just might not go back to canned tuna or salmon.

    • #28687
      Harter
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      Edible parts count as possession here except the by tag only species. 2 swans a yr seems like a waste of time . On the other hand I doubt with less than one warden per Maryland sized county they would check the pantry
      Some yr ago I had 4 licenses in the house ,we had a steady diet of wild meats with next to no store bought well into May and only “suffered” with store cow til Labor day weekend. Just me an Ms now ,and her work schedule makes it tough to get out and fill the larder.

      All that red meat probably isn’t good for.me anyway.

    • #28688
      Reg
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      My understanding is that wild meat won’t hurt you a bit. Other than shell fish ( crawdads ???? ) no cholesterol.
      I try to do a lot of fishing but watch when I do. If there is lots of rainfall, then they keep the gates open at the dam . I think this allows runoff of farm chemicals to get mixed and washed through. If they close the gates and especially when the water level drops, I don’t fish as I am sure those chemicals are building up.

    • #28707
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      Hasn’t yet .

    • #28752
      Reg
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      Speaking of crawdads, perhaps some of you boys in the south can help me. Wanting to catch a good mess of crawdads and have a couple of locations where they might be found in abundance but want to learn a good way to catch them in bulk.
      Following Duck Dynasty I have seen where Phil has gone out with what looks like a cone shaped affair made from what looks like 1/2″ hardware cloth and knocks them dead.
      Just how is that trap constructed ? How big, what exact shape and what is a good bait? Any other info ???

      Yours for better eating, I remain

    • #28764
      Goodsteel
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      Yeah Reg, you just make a trap that has an easy way to get in, but a very narrow way to escape. Basically, you fold your wire mesh in to create a reverse cone in the trap. Kind of like cutting the top off a 2 liter pop jug and stapling it back on upside down (which has been used as an effective crawdad trap).
      For bait, just use whatever you’ve got. Fish heads is best, as that’s just the sort of thing they eat. Best thing is to just go fishing with worms right in the area you plan to lay your traps. Catch those brim and just chop them up and throw the pieces in the trap and sink it. Keep going till you run out of traps.
      Then, just run your traps every day, and check em out. Keep fishing and baiting. If you don’t have a lot of brim in that area or fish you can catch easily, just use chicken liver, or buy a bag of dirt cheap leg quarters and dice them up into zip lock bags. When you go to run your traps, grab a bag from the fridge and throw it in the boat.
      Pretty easy really. The hard part is finding a good spot that’s got crawdads by the gajillions.
      Good luck!

    • #28788
      Reg
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      Thank you.
      I think I know the perfect place to give this a try, a back bay off the main channel out at the lake. Drove by it on the 3ed and it looks like it is full of water.
      BUT. Have to get caught up on hilling potatoes , fixing fence, finishing the west corrals, mowing weeding in the garden– etc, etc, etc.
      I love summer but it sure dosn’t allow much time to do what I really want to do. Have a bunch of rifle projects, a whole list of things I want to try out on the range.
      Fishing and taking the 4 wheeler up into the hills.
      I think I need 2 of me.

    • #28799
      farmerjim
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      4 acres of vegetables for sale. Tomatoes, peppers.sweet corn,eggplant, potatoes, watermelon, winter squash, summer squash, cucumbers, sweet onions, Beside selling at farmers Markets I feed hungry deer and coons. The corn fed coons are helping feed some of the local needy and the deer will help me fill my freezer this fall.

    • #28802
      Reg
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      farmerjim;n8017 wrote: 4 acres of vegetables for sale. Tomatoes, peppers.sweet corn,eggplant, potatoes, watermelon, winter squash, summer squash, cucumbers, sweet onions, Beside selling at farmers Markets I feed hungry deer and coons. The corn fed coons are helping feed some of the local needy and the deer will help me fill my freezer this fall.

      Now THATS a garden !!!!

    • #29613
      Reg
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      How is your garden progressing ?

      Sunflowers are doing exceptionally well, already canning beets, green beans snow peas, some corn. Lots of all kinds of squash, okra and egg plant. Chard and radishes, turnips and snow peas are ready for a replant.
      Using a new system of watering the potatoes. Sweet potatoes out here take a lot of water to make. Cousin came up with the idea of using sections of old walking sprinkler tubes and makes the job simple and easy.
      Also peaches are about ready to pick, already picked the plums and looks like there will be a few Sand Hill Plums.
      Rabbits running everywhere and Ol Hank is staying skinny just chasing them. Not sure if he would know what to do if he ever caught one.

    • #29614
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      So far, 77 zucchini (the largest two being 9 lbs each), 29 cucumber, and 4 gophers. There are more of all in the garden now. Not bad for 4 zucchini plants and 2 cucumber plants. And a short growing season.

    • #29627
      Reg
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      Charlie.
      I see you let your zeeks get big. The wife and it seems about everyone else don’t want them that way, they like them less than 9 or 10 inches long.
      Myself, I let them get as big as reasonably possible then core them and run through a food processor for shredding. Even leave the hides on.
      Let them sit in a large colander for a bit, they will drain some liquid, then put in a large stainless steel pot and mix in an appropriate amount of eggs,
      Reach in the pot and grab a good hand full of the mixture, form into a ball just a bit smaller than a hard ball and place on a cookie sheet covered with wax paper, and sprinkle on a small amount of bread crumbs and place in the freezer to freeze solid. Later, remove from the cookie sheets and place in 2 gallon zip lock bags.
      I do not have diabetes and do not want it but do have to control and worry about blood sugar. Two of these fried in olive oil light brown served with sugarless pancake syrup from Wally World is a great breakfast and will keep me in the 95 to 100 range with no problems. Sometimes will have a bit of deer meat or a egg with them.
      Seems like everyone was turning up their noses at my weird breakfast but had a couple of the kids home a few weeks ago and fixed up a whole plate of them. They were gone before even I could sit down. I think I made some converts.

    • #29628
      Reg
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      Also, not sure exactly where you are at but yes, we too are enjoying a very short growing season. North and west of us in the Snowey Range they have had snow as low as 8500 feet, some light snow on Loveland Pass and at the tunnel. They were calling for possible freeze warnings in Carbon and Albany counties across the line in Wyoming. We were down to 43 the other night but warming up again for a bit.
      Ya— Gore must be right. It’s global warming !!!

    • #29631
      Rattlesnake Charlie
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      I’m in Los Alamos, NM. 7400 ft and about 75 miles south of the border with Colorado. Lows are now in the low 50’s with highs lucky to reach 70. It could frost any time now.

      I peeled and cored the big ones. Shredded I use for pancakes too. I often eat them with just some salt and hot sauce. Sometimes with syrup. Diced I fry them like potatoes. I toss them into roasts and stews too. Finely chopped in the food processor they become zucchini bread. Big hit at work.

    • #29634
      Waksupi
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      Mine hasn’t done worth a darn this year. I need to test the soil, I think it’s gone acid, and needs a bit of lime added. I have zucchini plants, that have only produced one each. Unheard of, but maybe I should sell the seeds to people who get overwhelmed.

    • #29635
      Reg
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      Rattlesnake Charlie;n9101 wrote: I’m in Los Alamos, NM. 7400 ft and about 75 miles south of the border with Colorado. Lows are now in the low 50’s with highs lucky to reach 70. It could frost any time now.

      I peeled and cored the big ones. Shredded I use for pancakes too. I often eat them with just some salt and hot sauce. Sometimes with syrup. Diced I fry them like potatoes. I toss them into roasts and stews too. Finely chopped in the food processor they become zucchini bread. Big hit at work.

      We are only 3450 so no doubt you will get zapped before we do but for what ever reason it is not uncommon for us to get a freeze even before Denver. Seems like what ever weather is going on up in Montana and especially Wyoming, we get.

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