This topic contains 12 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Sgt. Mike 2 years, 7 months ago.

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  • #34550
     Sgt. Mike 
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    Well really 22LR cases for 22 jackets.
    How many use the:
    a. Lee pot method
    b. propane burner
    c. or ???

    Tim was nice enough to shoot me a D.R. Corbin jacket maker die set.
    I used the propane torch method to learn the die at first. The annealing went good, although I actually got a about 5 way to hot out of 100 or so.
    I quenched in water (1 teaspoon of vinegar), and dawn dishwashing.
    I need to add the SS pins method as well, to polish the jacket staining.
    I’m considering the next batch for the Lee pot method to get a production level going and speed up the process.

    Just looking for a consensus or input of economical ideas that might speed up the annealing.

  • #34554
     skeettx 
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    Oven self cleaning mode, cases on cookie sheet, and then take out and quench in cold water
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-cleaning_oven

    Mike

  • #34556
     Sgt. Mike 
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    Three hours at 500-900 degrees should do it. Or at least one would think.
    Thank you Mike.
    Last time I tried my oven on the self cleaning mode it did not seem to work. Or maybe it was 1 percent smarter than me LOL.
    That being said seems I read or heard that time with a higher temp would anneal the cases.

  • #34563
     skeettx 
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    Yes 900 degrees has done it for me
    approximately 500 degrees Celsius or 900 degrees Fahrenheit

    Remember the quench

  • #34567
     Screwbolts 
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    skeettx,

    First, I have never annealed 22lr cases, but I have annealed the necks of thousands of center fire from 22 Hornet to 50 BMGs. Why the water Quench when annealing the 22lr cases? Is there a known advantage to quenching them, all of my CF cases just air cool after annealing.

    Ken

  • #34569
     popper 
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    750F for a short period of time works. Metallurgy speaking, quenching can cause micro stress cracks (thermal shock). The pot method, IIRC is placing in a pipe with TP and drop into pot for a while. I use the torch method on necks and GC, seems to work. With GC in a pan, torch till they just flash ‘silver’ them move the heat to others. They don’t get the oxide on them. IMO the 22lr would respond the same way. Get them too hot and you get the oxide. Wonder if a slight bit of solder paste flux will prevent the oxidation?

  • #34574
     Goodsteel 
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    skeettx;n15611 wrote: Yes 900 degrees has done it for me
    approximately 500 degrees Celsius or 900 degrees Fahrenheit

    Remember the quench

    This seems to be the best that has been mentioned. Although I have no idea why the quench? I believe brass doesn’t care one way or tother.

  • #34575
     Screwbolts 
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    when annealing copper gas checks I use a Black pipe nipple with caps on both ends. I also put a strip of paper in with the checks and that chars using up all the O2 in the pipe keeping the checks from oxidizing.

    I will quite often just set the pipe in the hot cools in the wood boiler for a couple hours and the remove letting it cool before opening and emptying.

    Ken

  • #34577
     skeettx 
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    http://reloadingcreations.com/?page_id=153

    http://www.corbins.com/kit-224.htm
    (Prepare the jacket Anneal the jacket by heating it with a hand torch or running it through a self clean cycle in an electric oven.)

    Why quench?
    That is what Dave Corbin told me to do while we chatted on the phone in 1973 🙂

    Above says “This isn’t necessary to assist in the annealing process; it simply makes the brass able to be handled quicker.”

    The annealing takes place AFTER the case is drawn

    Mike

  • #34582
     Sgt. Mike 
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    Yes Mike
    I quenched right after the propane torch method. Like you mentioned it allows you to handle the cases to jackets quicker.
    And does not really assist the annealing itself. The vinegar, water, dawn detergent does help with scale a lot, cleans them a little bit, and acts as etching agent (the vinegar).

    Another thing that I have heard but have not observed is it is better to de-rim prior to annealing or one could punch through.
    I annealed prior to deriming and after did not observe this. I did note that it was easier to derim by annealing prior.
    The oven method sounds better for mass prepping, the propane is a bit slow.
    Right now I’m annealing twice, once before drawing and then again after drawing, this keeps the jackets from work hardening.
    This might be overkill but I think that it will assist once I wind up with core seating and point up dies right now I’m just making jackets.

  • #34586
     Screwbolts 
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    skeettx, Thank you for the explanation ” Above says “This isn’t necessary to assist in the annealing process; it simply makes the brass able to be handled quicker.”

    Yes, I understand that you can handle them quicker to wait for them to dry out. 🙂 Possibly, if you are going to wet pin tumble them then being wet is not an issue.

    Ken

  • #34625
     bullet maker 
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    I used to put the drawn jackets in a mesh basket and put them in my turkey fryer. I just got a heat treat oven. Another learning experiance. I anneal after drawing. To many punch thrus.

  • #34704
     Sgt. Mike 
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    have not had any punch through on the ones that I annealed prior to drawing, but have since stopped (the quantity that I tried was small sample). As the information that I read plus what others here have stated, made sense that it could / would happen.

    Thanks for the input Pete.

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