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    • #27221
      JRR
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      Just came back from the salvage yard with 5, 4lb. bars of 40/60 solder. The ingots read American Smelting and Refining Co., solder. On the backside is stamped 40 – 60. I’m assuming it is 40% tin and 60% lead.

      How should I incorporate this into a bullet casting allow like #2. I’m thinking of blending with high antimony lead from Roto Metals.

      Any suggestions are appreciated.

      I paid $1 per pound

      Thanks,
      Jeff

    • #27222
      JRR
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      I have at present, approx. 100 lbs of pure, 75 lbs of clean coww and a small amout of lino and #2. The Roto Metals high antimony allow is horridly expensive.
      Thanks,
      Jeff

    • #27223
      chutesnreloads
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      Sounds like you got a bargain.Use one of the alloy calculators to find a formula you like.Depending on your use you can probably save some your tin and antimony by casting softer than #2.

    • #27227
      Goodsteel
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      You’re playing for high stakes when you have alloy that is that rich.
      First thing you should do is smelt all the solder together into one large pot, flux the living jeepers out of it, and pour it into new ingots. This way everything is uniformed, and if you send a sample off to be analyzed, you can be sure it’s indicative of the whole batch.
      Next, send a sample off to be tested. You want to know, that you know, that you know, that you KNOW what’s in this stuff, because if you mix up a bunch of ingots that are supposed to be Lyman #2, and you wind up with something totally different, it may be a very expensive thing to fix.

      OK, so you got the sample. The next thing is to use an alloy calculator to decide by weight exactly how much of your known alloys to mix together to make the alloy you want.

      I highly suggest you make sure to use an accurate scale when doing this. It’s slow, but I use a 10lb scale for weighing food. what you do is turn it on, and place a steel dish on top of the scale. Tare the scale with the dish, then remove it. Say you need 5.2lb of your superhard. You put an ingot on the scale and set the dish on TOP of it. Scale says your ingot weighs 4.95lb.
      OK, hold off on the hacksaw my friend!
      You have a steel dish on top of your scale and you know what weight you are after. Simply hold another ingot with a pair of pliers, and fire up your propane torch. Melt the corner off the ingot so that it drips in that dish. Keep dripping till you hit the exact weight you are after.

      Once you have ever so carefully weighed and prepped your metals for mixing, and double checked your weights and figures, melt them together and flux the jeepers out of them. Do so at a high temperature in adequate ventilation.

      If you follow these simple steps, you will be sure of what you have, and more importantly, you’ll be able to make it again in the future.

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